0
   

Are my sentences correct?

 
 
Jura
 
Reply Sun 13 Aug, 2017 05:36 am
Hi friends!

Does the following sentences sound natural to you? Can you see any mistakes? Thank you in advance for your help Wink

There's a student in a class called Jack. Nobody likes him but his classmate, Michael. Somebody has stolen the class teacher's wallet and the rest of the class knows who did that. Despite the fact, they backed the true cultprit up and tried to put the blame on Jack.

(Jack's mother to the headmaster) ->
Michael was the only one sticking up for Jack before all the class saying it wasn't him who stole the class teacher's wallet. I don't believe he did that.
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Question • Score: 0 • Views: 686 • Replies: 18
No top replies

 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sun 13 Aug, 2017 06:15 am
@Jura,
First things first: Do the following sentences sound natural to you? Sentences is a plural noun, and therefore takes a plural form of the verb.

As you ask whether the sentences sound natural, I will render them into the commonly used forms (of American English).

There's a student in the class (or "our class") called Jack. Nobody likes him but his classmate Micheal. Somebody had* stolen the teacher's (you don't need to repeat "the class" because that will be understood) wallet, and the rest of the class know ("class," although singular, represents several individuals, and is understood to be a plural noun) who did it. Despite the fact, they backed up the true culprit, and blamed Jack.

(*I wrote "had stolen" because this passage describes something which happened in the past--the unjust accusation of Jack, Michael's defense of him and the mother's comment to the Principal (Headmaster). Therefore, the theft is from the past, but an earlier past, an anterior past. "Had stolen" is the anterior past form of the verb, indicating that the theft took place before the the accusation and the defense of Jack.)

Michael was the only one sticking up for Jack before the class, (all the class sounds awkward, and is understood in context without specifying all of the class) saying it wasn't him who had stolen the teacher's wallet. I don't believe he did it.

In British usage, one would say the Headmaster. In American usage, one would say the Principal. Any other differences between American and British usage will doubtlessly be pointed out by a British member here, if any show up.

There's a student in our class called Jack. Nobody likes him but his classmate Micheal. Somebody had stolen the teacher's wallet, and the rest of the class know who did it. Despite the fact, they backed up the true culprit, and blamed Jack.

Micheal was the only one sticking up for Jack before the class, saying it wasn't him who had stolen the teacher's wallet. I don't believe he did it.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Sun 13 Aug, 2017 06:56 am
@Setanta,
Terms like headmaster and headmistress have fallen out of favour, headteacher tends to be used now. It makes life easier if all you know about the head is their surname and initials.

Over here principals are in charge of colleges.
0 Replies
 
dalehileman
 
  -1  
Reply Sun 13 Aug, 2017 09:40 pm
@Jura,
Quote:
There's a student in a class called Jack.
This could momentarily confuse 'cuz it seems to say the class itself is named 'Jack', where it was taught how to raise heavy objects

In one of the classes there's a student called Jack, despised by all the rest of his classmates except Michael

Somebody had stolen the teacher's wallet, while the rest of the class is sure Michael did it. Nevertheless they backed up the true culprit but for some reason tried to put the blame on Jack

Remarkably enough, since Michael was the only one sticking up for Jack, continuing to defend him, I don't believe he was guilty either
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Mon 14 Aug, 2017 12:57 am
@Jura,
Ignore Dale, he's in the early stages of Alzheimer's and doesn't really know what he's talking about.
dalehileman
 
  -1  
Reply Mon 14 Aug, 2017 11:06 am
@izzythepush,
Quote:
Ignore Dale
Most folk do anyway

Quote:
early stages of Alzheimer's
Actually pretty late, Iz, don't 'mem' what I did five minutes ago

doesn't really know what he's talking aboutTo some extent, Push, I'm sure you're right. But if I can clarify my remarks in any to improve your grasp, please respond
izzythepush
 
  2  
Reply Mon 14 Aug, 2017 01:19 pm
@dalehileman,
I'm not being nasty. You're an unreliable source, and people, especially people learning English, need to know that.
dalehileman
 
  -1  
Reply Mon 14 Aug, 2017 01:36 pm
@izzythepush,
Quote:
You're an unreliable source
Okay Iz, I'm sure you're right, but if you could give me a 'zampl,' a link of some sort, or even fwd a sentence or two, I'd be most happy to clarify
Jura
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 Aug, 2017 03:12 pm
@Setanta,
Perfect! You're great, Setanta Wink
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 Aug, 2017 05:25 pm
I hope that helped. I'd be glad if it did.
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Aug, 2017 01:08 am
@dalehileman,
You admit your sentences may need clarifying, that in itself should tell you to keep off the language threads.

Why not join the debate on confederate statues?
dalehileman
 
  0  
Reply Tue 22 Aug, 2017 04:39 am
@izzythepush,
Quote:
keep off the language threads
Alas yew Iz, I've entertained that very observation. But it's a compulsion. Out of a couple hundred such attempt, I actually was awarded one 'best'

Quote:
Why not join the debate on confederate statues?
Bores me to death, but thanks Iz anyhow
dalehileman
 
  0  
Reply Tue 22 Aug, 2017 10:41 am
@izzythepush,
Quote:
sentences may need clarifying
So Iz where and in what way
Links welcome
Glennn
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Aug, 2017 10:56 am
@dalehileman,
Dale, I will test you. Do you see anything wrong with the following sentence?

You admit your sentences may need clarifying, that in itself should tell you to keep off the language threads.

Do you think a semicolon instead of a comma?
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Aug, 2017 01:07 pm
@dalehileman,
dalehileman wrote:

Quote:
You're an unreliable source
fwd a sentence or two, I'd be most happy to clarify
dalehileman
 
  0  
Reply Tue 22 Aug, 2017 01:16 pm
@izzythepush,
Iz at 86 w/Alzie's, I'm somewhat confused by that last'n'. I had offered to clarify any specific sentence or even para with which to you or other had proved unsatisfying, if you'd send a link. I'm not sure, but I think that means searching for a typical example of my incompetent fumbling,, highlighting it, copying, then placing in a new posting as a response, indicating below it, eg, what was found to be inadequate
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Aug, 2017 01:19 pm
@dalehileman,
I know your situation which is why I think you should lay off the language threads.

I will repeat the offer I made about giving a considered response to all your posts if you lay off the language threads, although not until I get back from Copenhagen.
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Aug, 2017 01:30 pm
@izzythepush,
Quote:
until I get back from Copenhagen.
Heck Izzy have a good time
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Aug, 2017 02:41 pm
@dalehileman,
Pretty good so far.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

Word Choice - Question by LBrinkmann
Word Choice - Question by LBrinkmann
Word Choice - Question by LBrinkmann
Word Choice - Question by LBrinkmann
Word Choice - Question by LBrinkmann
Word Choice - Question by LBrinkmann
Word Choice - Question by LBrinkmann
Word Choice - Question by LBrinkmann
Word Choice - Question by LBrinkmann
Word Choice - Question by LBrinkmann
Word Choice - Question by LBrinkmann
 
  1. Forums
  2. » Are my sentences correct?
Copyright © 2022 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 05/25/2022 at 11:25:20