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Is it normal to still be dependent on your parents after you graduate from college?

 
 
Reply Sat 18 Jun, 2016 04:07 pm
Or is it unusual?
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Type: Question • Score: 3 • Views: 1,289 • Replies: 14
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dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Sat 18 Jun, 2016 04:22 pm
@prpinrni,
Prp, it's getting to be a pretty common practice
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Leadfoot
 
  1  
Reply Sat 18 Jun, 2016 04:26 pm
Especially for Italian literature majors.
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cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Sat 18 Jun, 2016 08:28 pm
@prpinrni,
What I have observed personally is that a college degree doesn't necessarily provide the graduate with a livable income. Our son graduated summa cum laude, and also earned a graduate degree. He works part time for the University of Texas in Austin, but we help him financially.
I have always told my children to go into a career field they will enjoy. Since our son enjoys his work, I'm happy for him. Also, helping him financially is not a burden for us.
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Leadfoot
 
  1  
Reply Sun 19 Jun, 2016 09:02 am
Yep, the myth of - 'You are always going to be better off financially if you get a college degree' is starting to develop some deep cracks.
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MegaMoh
 
  1  
Reply Wed 29 Jun, 2016 01:13 am
@prpinrni,
after it immediately yes but after like 5 or 6 years I think not sir but like 2 or 3 years ok
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mark noble
 
  1  
Reply Wed 29 Jun, 2016 12:34 pm
@prpinrni,
One man's 'Normal' is another man's abnormal'.
You choose.
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Wed 29 Jun, 2016 02:41 pm
@mark noble,
I guess I was lucky. When I graduated in 1963 with an Accounting degree, I had four job offers. I took the offer from Florsheim Shoe Company. After working as a Field Auditor in the seven western states for 3.5 years, I was promoted to Audit Manager. We moved to Naperville, a suburb of Chicago, and built a beautiful brick and cedar home. Worked in management for the rest of my working career. I believe luck and timing has much to do with having a successful career.
mark noble
 
  0  
Reply Wed 29 Jun, 2016 03:18 pm
@cicerone imposter,
And your life-story is relevant to me, Why?
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Wed 29 Jun, 2016 03:35 pm
@mark noble,
Put me in IGNORE. It's not about you!
mark noble
 
  1  
Reply Wed 29 Jun, 2016 03:40 pm
@cicerone imposter,
Never suggested it was - It's, clearly, about you...you....you.
Just stop telling me, please.
I don't give a dead pig about you, or your life story.
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Wed 29 Jun, 2016 05:02 pm
@mark noble,
mark, just because ci happened to click "reply" and not "reply all" does not mean he was directing his post to you to the exclusion of everyone else.

I found his post interesting.
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georgeob1
 
  1  
Reply Wed 29 Jun, 2016 06:06 pm
"Normal" changes over time. A century ago many young people skipped high school and started work in their teens, becoming independent of their parents soon after that. A century earlier they were working on the farm or in facories earlier than that. Childhood and dependency have been extending steadily over time. The milennial generation appears to have made a specialty out of it.

Another possibly related factor is that, as the number and variety of college programs and degrees have multiplied and the fraction of youth attending college has grown, the relative economic value of college has decreased. There are lots of jobs out there for graduates in engineering, geology chemistry and mathematics, but few in proportion to the number of graduates for those who study psychology, sociology or journalism, or any of the plethora of soft, pseudo- sciences that academic institutions have so assiduously deployed.
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Wed 29 Jun, 2016 06:35 pm
@georgeob1,
Within a year of my birth, my families normal changed a bit.

Before that time we had 3 generations in one house.

My grandmother, My aunt and uncle and their son, and my father and mother and their 3 (before me) kids.

It was a big place. On the first floor a third of it was a big kitchen and really big table, a third was an office and workspace, and a third was a diner. The upper floor had private suites. One was a sitting room and bedroom for my grandmother, 2 adjoining bedrooms for my aunt/uncle and their son, and 3 adjoining bedrooms for my mom and dad 2 brothers and sisters. There were 2 bathrooms, one at either end of the central hallway. It was on our businesses property. When I came along my father built another smaller house on the same property, and we moved probably 50 yards away.

Eventually that big house got torn down, and it was replaced with a building with the store and offices on the first floor, and 2 separate aparments, a one bedroom and a 2 bedroom, for grandma and aunt uncle and son.

There was another house on the property that had been divided into 3 separate units, like townhouses. When one of my brothers married he moved into the biggest unit with his wife. There was also a little bungalow plomped in the middle of it all, and my cousin lived there for a while.

So, my normal until I left home at 19 was being able to see everyone's home just by looking out the window.

Prior to all that, when my mother and father first married, they lived with his mother and father for a few months, while he built a house on a double vacant lot he bought with their wedding money as a down payment. They moved in, and after work and weekends he built another house, he sold the one they lived in and moved in the new one. With the money he bought another lot, build, move repeat until be had done that with I think 4 houses on that street.

That was back in the day when peope did that really stupid thing of giving the bride and groom money as a wedding gift, so they could get a house. Boy was that dumb, huh?
georgeob1
 
  1  
Reply Wed 29 Jun, 2016 06:48 pm
@chai2,
No argument there. Another observable phenomenon in contemporary life is that extended family cohesion is often far less than in previous generations. Families that remain reasonably intact for (say) three generations such as yours, whether in one house or several even in different cities or states are becoming increasingly rare. The elderly (there are more of them because birth rates are down and longevity is increasing) are more often left to fend for themselves or rely on public facilities, while, at the same time young people remain dependent longer.
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