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Does "a peanut for a brain" mean "a brain that is as small as a peanut"?

 
 
Reply Thu 3 Dec, 2015 12:41 am
1)Does "a peanut for a brain" mean "a brain that is as small as a peanut"?
2) Does "it pleased God by the foolishness of preaching to save them that believe" mean "to save those who believe God will delight God (the method to save is preaching; such preaching, so foolish in God's eye, nonetheless will please God)"?


Context:

I have read various debates over whether or not Albert Einstein was a Christian. The answer clearly is a big NO! Anyone who calls Jesus Christ a "myth" has a peanut for a brain. No wonder God said in 1st Corinthians 1:21, "For after that in the wisdom of God the world by wisdom knew not God, it pleased God by the foolishness of preaching to save them that believe." It is secular wisdom that blinds him from God's Truth.

Colossians 2:8 reads, "Beware lest any man spoil you through philosophy and vain deceit, after the tradition of men, after the rudiments of the world, and not after Christ." Man's greatest wisdom is utter foolishness to to God. Now there's nothing foolish about preaching the Gospel, but it always appears foolish to the lost Christ-rejecting world. Unto us which believe, Jesus is Precious (1st Peter 2:7). To the born again believer, Jesus is Almighty God (John 1:1-3,14; 10:33; Revelation 1:8). To the unsaved, Jesus is just a myth or a great historical figure.

More:
http://jesus-is-savior.com/Wolves/einstein.htm
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Type: Question • Score: 2 • Views: 488 • Replies: 10
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layman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 3 Dec, 2015 04:53 am
@oristarA,
1. Sho nuff

2. The sentence is:

Quote:
For after that in the wisdom of God the world by wisdom knew not God, it pleased God by the foolishness of preaching to save them that believe."


This is confusing, and there's not much context, but I take it to mean that those who didn't know god well *thought* they were pleasing him by preaching to save them that believe. The suggestion appears to be that if you believe, then you ARE saved--you don't need to *be* saved (by preaching or anything else).

It appears to me that the author is trying to make a point, and, in the attempt to do so, he has quoted a passage that is not particularly apt. His basic point seems to be that because Einstein was a scientist, who tried to understand "worldly" things, he thought Christ was just a myth. The second passage quoted seems more to the point.
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Thu 3 Dec, 2015 05:15 am
@layman,
layman wrote:

1. Sho nuff

2. The sentence is:

Quote:
For after that in the wisdom of God the world by wisdom knew not God, it pleased God by the foolishness of preaching to save them that believe."


This is confusing, and there's not much context, but I take it to mean that those who didn't know god well *thought* they were pleasing him by preaching to save them that believe. The suggestion appears to be that if you believe, then you ARE saved--you don't need to *be* saved (by preaching or anything else).

It appears to me that the author is trying to make a point, and, in the attempt to do so, he has quoted a passage that is not particularly apt. His basic point seems to be that because Einstein was a scientist, who tried to understand "worldly" things, he thought Christ was just a myth. The second passage quoted seems more to the point.


Thank you Lay.
In that context, "the foolishness" - whose foolishness?
layman
 
  0  
Reply Thu 3 Dec, 2015 05:53 am
@oristarA,
Quote:
In that context, "the foolishness" - whose foolishness?


The foolishness of those who "think" they know the wisdom of God but who really only know the "wisdom" of the world. In this case, the ones doing the "preaching."

The whole phrasing is antiquated, and not readily understandable by modern standards.
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Thu 3 Dec, 2015 05:56 am
@layman,
layman wrote:

Quote:
In that context, "the foolishness" - whose foolishness?


The foolishness of those who "think" they know the wisdom of God but who really only know the "wisdom" of the world.


But they are preaching God. Why did the author want to ridicule his own kind?
layman
 
  0  
Reply Thu 3 Dec, 2015 06:00 am
@oristarA,
Quote:
But they are preaching God. Why did the author want to ridicule his own kind?


Not sure what you're asking here. The first passage is trying to say 2 things. One of those things is that the wisdom of god is not the same as the wisdom of the world.

As for why it's "foolish," (which is the second thing) see my first post. That's what I take it to be saying.

In the sentence "it" refers to "the wisdom of the world," read literally. Of course, read literally, it couldn't be "preaching." Abstract concepts don't "preach," people do.
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Thu 3 Dec, 2015 06:07 am
@layman,
layman wrote:

Quote:
But they are preaching God. Why did the author want to ridicule his own kind?


Not sure what you're asking here. The first passage is trying to say 2 things. One of those things is that the wisdom of god is not the same as the wisdom of the world.

As for why it's "foolish," (which is the second thing) see my first post. That's what I take it to be saying.

In the sentence "it" refers to "the wisdom of the world," read literally. Of course, read literally, it couldn't be "preaching." Abstract concepts don't "preach," people do.


That is, whether people believe God or Not, they always foolish in comparison to God's wisdom?

Well, you've said the passage is confusing. No big deal here. Let it go.
layman
 
  0  
Reply Thu 3 Dec, 2015 06:10 am
@oristarA,
Quote:
But they are preaching God. Why did the author want to ridicule his own kind?


They're not said to be preaching God. They are preaching to save those that believe. See the difference?
layman
 
  0  
Reply Thu 3 Dec, 2015 06:13 am
@oristarA,
Quote:
That is, whether people believe God or Not, they always foolish in comparison to God's wisdom?


OK, one more time. Yeah, worldly wisdom is not god's wisdom. That's one point.

As to the "foolishness," I interpret it to be saying that those who believe are, ipso facto, "saved," and don't need preaching to save them.
0 Replies
 
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Thu 3 Dec, 2015 06:24 am
@layman,
layman wrote:

Quote:
But they are preaching God. Why did the author want to ridicule his own kind?


They're not said to be preaching God. They are preaching to save those that believe. See the difference?


Thanks.
Does "those that believe" mean "those who believe"?
layman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 3 Dec, 2015 06:43 am
@oristarA,
Quote:
Does "those that believe" mean "those who believe"?


Right. To me it does. That's what I meant, in any event.
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