1
   

Mother Of The Year

 
 
chai2
 
  2  
Reply Thu 30 Apr, 2015 07:59 am
@Linkat,
Linkat wrote:

but this boys actions were very extreme and could get him in huge trouble.


Or shot dead by the police.

0 Replies
 
giujohn
 
  1  
Reply Fri 1 May, 2015 02:19 pm
@cers,
Quote:


I KNOW, I KNOW...CAN I TELL THEM???

Go for it!


Was it the term used by slaves for the person who cracked the whip? He was the cracker, right?
roger
 
  2  
Reply Fri 1 May, 2015 02:29 pm
@giujohn,
No. It comes from inland Florida cattle raisers. Couldn't afford horses so they marched their cattle to market on foot, but cracking the whips to keep things moving along. Instead of being cattle barons, they were just a bunch of toothless rednecks. My apologies to some real fine rednecks I've known.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Fri 1 May, 2015 02:40 pm
@revelette2,
revelette2 wrote:

Agreed, hardly anyone worth mentioning is talking about Freddie Gray and the reason the riots are happening.


looks like the attention has returned to what happened to Freddie Gray

http://foxct.com/2015/05/01/freddie-grays-death-ruled-homicide-by-medical-examiner/

Quote:
Freddie Gray death ruled homicide; five of six officers charged are in custody



police-are-using-me-to-cover-their-ass

witness-behind-freddie-gray-video-detained

tears-of-joy-in-freddie-grays-community-after-criminal-charges-announced
giujohn
 
  1  
Reply Fri 1 May, 2015 02:43 pm
@roger,
Dana Ste. Claire, a Florida historian and anthropologist who studies, er, crackers...It was in the late 1800s when writers from the North started referring to the hayseed faction of Southern homesteaders as crackers. "[Those writers] decided that they were called that because of the cracking of the whip when they drove slaves," Ste. Claire said.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Fri 1 May, 2015 02:49 pm
http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=cracker

Quote:
cracker (n.1) Look up cracker at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., "hard wafer," but the specific application to a thin, crisp biscuit is 1739; agent noun from crack (v.). Cracker-barrel (adj.) "emblematic of down-home ways and views" is from 1877.

cracker (n.2) Look up cracker at Dictionary.com

Southern U.S. derogatory term for "poor, white trash" (1766), probably an agent noun from crack (v.) in the sense "to boast" (as in not what it's cracked up to be). Compare Latin crepare "to rattle, crack, creak," with a secondary figurative sense of "boast of, prattle, make ado about."

I should explain to your Lordship what is meant by crackers; a name they have got from being great boasters; they are a lawless set of rascalls on the frontiers of Virginia, Maryland, the Carolinas and Georgia, who often change their places of abode. [1766, G. Cochrane]




But DARE compares corn-cracker "poor white farmer" (1835, U.S. Midwest colloquial). Especially of Georgians by 1808, though often extended to residents of northern Florida. Another name in mid-19c. use was sand-hiller "poor white in Georgia or South Carolina."

Not very essentially different is the condition of a class of people living in the pine-barrens nearest the coast [of South Carolina], as described to me by a rice-planter. They seldom have any meat, he said, except they steal hogs, which belong to the planters, or their negroes, and their chief diet is rice and milk. "They are small, gaunt, and cadaverous, and their skin is just the color of the sand-hills they live on. They are quite incapable of applying themselves steadily to any labor, and their habits are very much like those of the old Indians." [Frederick Law Olmsted, "A Journey in the Seaboard Slave States," 1856]
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Fri 1 May, 2015 03:00 pm
@ehBeth,
http://www.npr.org/blogs/codeswitch/2013/07/01/197644761/word-watch-on-crackers

Quote:
cracker's roots go back even further than the 17th century. All the way back to the age of Shakespeare, at least.

"The meaning of the word has changed a lot over the last four centuries," said Dana Ste. Claire, a Florida historian and anthropologist who studies, er, crackers. (He literally wrote the book on them.)

Ste. Claire pointed me to King John, published sometime in the 1590s. One character refers to another as a craker — a common insult for an obnoxious bloviator.

What craker is this same that deafs our ears with this abundance of superfluous breath?

"It's a beautiful quote, but it was a character trait that was used to describe a group of Celtic immigrants — Scots-Irish people who came to the Americas who were running from political circumstances in the old world," Ste. Claire said. Those Scots-Irish folks started settling the Carolinas, and later moved deeper South and into Florida and Georgia.

But the disparaging term followed these immigrants, who were thought by local officials to be unruly and ill-mannered.

"In official documents, the governor of Florida said, 'We don't know what to do with these crackers — we tell them to settle this area and they don't; we tell them not to settle this area and they do," Ste. Claire said. "They lived off the land. They were rogues."

By the early 1800s, those immigrants to the South started to refer to themselves that way as a badge of honor and a term of endearment. (I'm pretty sure this process of reappropriating a disparaging term sounds familiar to a lot of y'all.)

The crackers had their distinctive time-intensive cuisine — swamp cabbage, hoppin' john, corn pone — and favored architectural styles meant to make cooking in the brutal Southern summers more bearable. There were baseball teams called the Crackers. According to Ste. Claire, we've even had a cracker president.

"Jimmy Carter is a cracker," Ste. Claire said. "He's an Oglethorpe, from Celtic-English cracker stock. I don't know if he knows, but I think Jimmy Carter would proudly call himself one. "

It was in the late 1800s when writers from the North started referring to the hayseed faction of Southern homesteaders as crackers. "[Those writers] decided that they were called that because of the cracking of the whip when they drove slaves," Ste. Claire said. But he said that few crackers would have owned slaves; they were generally too poor. (That of course, doesn't mean they weren't participants in the South's slave economy in other ways.)
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Fri 1 May, 2015 03:01 pm
@giujohn,
giujohn wrote:
[Those writers] decided that they were called that because of the cracking of the whip when they drove slaves," Ste. Claire said.


putting in the balance of the comment would have been more honest
revelette2
 
  1  
Reply Fri 1 May, 2015 03:29 pm
@ehBeth,
Yes, I saw thought. I hope at the end of the day, justice prevails.
0 Replies
 
giujohn
 
  1  
Reply Fri 1 May, 2015 03:43 pm
@ehBeth,
Quote:
putting in the balance of the comment would have been more honest


Honest? or BORING?
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Fri 1 May, 2015 03:55 pm
@giujohn,
honest
giujohn
 
  1  
Reply Fri 1 May, 2015 06:08 pm
@ehBeth,
I vote for boring AND pedantic
ehBeth
 
  2  
Reply Fri 1 May, 2015 06:20 pm
@giujohn,
That you do not value honesty is noted.
giujohn
 
  1  
Reply Fri 1 May, 2015 06:29 pm
@ehBeth,
Like wise you being pedantic
ehBeth
 
  4  
Reply Fri 1 May, 2015 06:35 pm
@giujohn,
<shrug>

I'll take that over not valuing honesty.
giujohn
 
  0  
Reply Fri 1 May, 2015 07:35 pm
@ehBeth,
That YOU think I dont value honesty is noted just as I noted you are boring and pedantic
0 Replies
 
Miller
 
  0  
Reply Sun 3 May, 2015 09:53 pm
@giujohn,
giujohn wrote:

Ragman...it's ok you can come over to the dark side...we'll be gentle.


RAGS will have to be medicated first...Booooooo!!
0 Replies
 
 

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