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Atheism and the Alpha Papa Proof

 
 
Brandon9000
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 Dec, 2013 05:43 pm
@JohnJonesCardiff,
JohnJonesCardiff wrote:

Brandon9000 wrote:

JohnJonesCardiff wrote:

Brandon9000 wrote:

JohnJonesCardiff wrote:
...Yes, an aerial display in front of a crowd would be a good proof of God, so that we can all agree on what we see. That would be much better than something we can't all see, such as everyone being conscious.

Much better, since everyone being conscious admits several different explanations.


I can't think of any.

Natural forces of the universe, such as evolution by natural selection.

Play this game as long as you want. I'll win every time. It's just your substitute for a defensible argument.


I can't think of any natural explanations for consciousness, according to the limited spatio-temporal limits of natural.
But that takes us back to God living in space somewhere, in a natural region.

Evolution by natural selection is another possible explanation for the existence of consciousness. If you simply repeat "I can't think of any," with no intelligible argument to counter what I said, then you lose.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sat 28 Dec, 2013 01:48 am
@JohnJonesCardiff,
No, that's not true at all. All of your "spatio-temporal" BS is mere ipse dixit claims on your part, for which you provide no substantiation. There is no reason to take your response seriously. It you ever stop babbling, you might produce something worth discussing. So far, you haven't.
0 Replies
 
G H
 
  1  
Reply Sat 28 Dec, 2013 12:49 pm
@JohnJonesCardiff,
JohnJonesCardiff wrote:

Setanta wrote:

Ah-hahahahahahahahahaha . . .

As Brandon has pointed out, it's easy to take a rhetorically superior (and false) position by simply defining your intended interlocutor's position in untenable terms. That's what known as a straw man fallacy. Why would you assume that atheists have heard of believers in "spatial omnipotence?" I've never heard of any such thing, until i read this hilarious OP. By the way, since your options seem to be very limited, it might interest you to know that many, many cultures have imagined gods which are not omnipotent, and which did not create the cosmos. You've got me in stitches!

Nah, mate nah. You know what I mean. I mean God, you know, living in space. Atheists don't like the idea - Gods. Living in space. In fact, I can't think of anyone who does believe in it. Gods living in space I mean. And not a weird space. Just ordinary space, like space that's about a few billion miles away, sort of outer space. Get me?

IOW, you were trying to muddle [to what purpose?] these concept-holders' recognition of their own general idea by pulling out an oddball, specific example of what is subsumed under it -- or an eccentric, single instance of its application? "People who don't believe in Santa Claus do not like the idea of a Santa Claus that lives on Mars." As if their disbelief doesn't already entail SC being universally absent from any planet / location; or as if their disbelief isn't by default devoid of any special conditions that could make SC's existence more tenable or palatable to them.

And all to covertly quip: "Why is it that your own arse or head or elbow seems alien or foreign when presented from this particular angle or perspective?" [Or again, to what purpose?, if the motivation was otherwise / a more noble intent?]
JohnJonesCardiff
 
  1  
Reply Sun 29 Dec, 2013 04:41 am
@G H,
G H wrote:

JohnJonesCardiff wrote:

Setanta wrote:

Ah-hahahahahahahahahaha . . .

As Brandon has pointed out, it's easy to take a rhetorically superior (and false) position by simply defining your intended interlocutor's position in untenable terms. That's what known as a straw man fallacy. Why would you assume that atheists have heard of believers in "spatial omnipotence?" I've never heard of any such thing, until i read this hilarious OP. By the way, since your options seem to be very limited, it might interest you to know that many, many cultures have imagined gods which are not omnipotent, and which did not create the cosmos. You've got me in stitches!

Nah, mate nah. You know what I mean. I mean God, you know, living in space. Atheists don't like the idea - Gods. Living in space. In fact, I can't think of anyone who does believe in it. Gods living in space I mean. And not a weird space. Just ordinary space, like space that's about a few billion miles away, sort of outer space. Get me?

IOW, you were trying to muddle [to what purpose?] these concept-holders' recognition of their own general idea by pulling out an oddball, specific example of what is subsumed under it -- or an eccentric, single instance of its application? "People who don't believe in Santa Claus do not like the idea of a Santa Claus that lives on Mars." As if their disbelief doesn't already entail SC being universally absent from any planet / location; or as if their disbelief isn't by default devoid of any special conditions that could make SC's existence more tenable or palatable to them.

And all to covertly quip: "Why is it that your own arse or head or elbow seems alien or foreign when presented from this particular angle or perspective?" [Or again, to what purpose?, if the motivation was otherwise / a more noble intent?]



See new post.
0 Replies
 
 

 
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