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New on philosophy

 
 
-N
 
Reply Sat 6 Jul, 2013 02:12 am
I am new on philosophy and am wondering if I can get some insight on what others think about how things are formed or whatever it is you philosophize about. I've been starting to think about how things are and why things are how they are and science classes are fulfilling enough for me and teacher can't answer my questions. Can I have some insight on what you guys think perhaps?
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Type: Discussion • Score: 7 • Views: 1,651 • Replies: 14
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jespah
 
  1  
Reply Sat 6 Jul, 2013 06:15 am
@-N,
Philosophers tend to think about and discuss all sorts of stuff, but the biggie is generally existence. I'd advise starting small, and doing some reading.

Plato is one of the greatest thinkers of all time, and is the foundation of much (but not all, I caution you) modern thinking. He's also really, really readable, a characteristic not shared by many philosophers (e. g. Heidegger can be a slog).

Start with The Apology, The Crito and the Phaedo, and they all just so happen to be here.
-N
 
  1  
Reply Sat 6 Jul, 2013 10:04 am
@jespah,
Thank you. It is much obliged.
0 Replies
 
JLNobody
 
  1  
Reply Sat 6 Jul, 2013 10:22 pm
@jespah,
Jespah, as important as Plato is for the history of western philosophy, I hesitate to recommend him as a start for a beginner--for fear that he might be imprinted with the platonist bias. I would feel the same regarding the influence of Descartes. This perspective has been reinforced for me by a long discussion with Bob Wells (Dyslexia).
What I WOULD recommend as an introduction for a beginner is
The Story of Philosophy by Will Durant, a great introduction to the field in general. He can buy a used paperback copy in decent shape from Amazon for less the $2.00.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Sat 6 Jul, 2013 10:25 pm
@JLNobody,
The Worldly Philosophers is a fair overview, though maybe overly concerned with economics - which is where the Worldly comes from.
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neologist
 
  1  
Reply Sat 6 Jul, 2013 10:28 pm
@JLNobody,
Durant is an engaging writer. Great suggestion.
0 Replies
 
Ding an Sich
 
  1  
Reply Sun 7 Jul, 2013 04:48 pm
@-N,
-N wrote:

I am new on philosophy and am wondering if I can get some insight on what others think about how things are formed or whatever it is you philosophize about. I've been starting to think about how things are and why things are how they are and science classes are fulfilling enough for me and teacher can't answer my questions. Can I have some insight on what you guys think perhaps?


How things are formed can be approached epistemologically or scientifically, imo. The former deals with the conditions of possible experience, whether that be between me and the world (correspondence), me and other people (coherence), or me, other people, and the world (which combines correspondence and coherence). The latter investigates what exactly things are made up of and how they are formed (along with a good number of other things).

I do not include metaphysics because that area of philosophy, imo, will never tell you "what" things are made of. It will only tell you that things are identical, non-contradictory, and exist (which is obvious). Epistemology and scientific inquiry tell you "what" things and process are, as far as content is concerned.

Welcome to the forums, btw. Hopefully you're not here to simply post a question and leave, never to return. That happens a lot around here for whatever reason.
0 Replies
 
-N
 
  1  
Reply Mon 8 Jul, 2013 12:14 pm
Thank you all very much. This is helpful and it's much obliged.
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 8 Jul, 2013 12:44 pm
@-N,
Quote:
I am new on philosophy and am wondering if I can get some insight on what others think about how things are formed
Not sure N what you mean by "formed." If you mean "created," I'd propose that creation is unnecessary since She, It, has always existed

Quote:
or whatever it is you philosophize about.
(1) The value of philo or speculation, often dismissed as hopeless conjecture. According to the general principle that nothing is entirely anything while everything is partly something else, science and philo blend into one another

Quote:
I've been starting to think about how things are and why things are how they are
Good for you, indeed the biggest mystery of all. Based on recent suggestions that the physical constants may be interdependent, one might speculate that things are the way they are, because they can't be any other way. A change in any one would entail a contradiction, negate the Entire Production

Quote:
and science classes are fulfilling enough for me and teacher can't answer my questions.
Thus Sci Teach not a philo

Quote:
Can I have some insight on what you guys think perhaps?
Happy to chat however worthless my views considered hereabout. Please N specify any subject of especial interest
0 Replies
 
Lustig Andrei
 
  1  
Reply Mon 8 Jul, 2013 02:10 pm
@-N,
JL's suggestion re:the Will Durant book is excellent. It's better to get an understanding of what philosophy is all about and who the noted philosophers of the past are before getting involved in reading the works of any specific philosopher.
JLNobody
 
  1  
Reply Mon 8 Jul, 2013 04:44 pm
@Lustig Andrei,
Durant's work is my first exposure to philosophy (in my early twenties). And ever since I've read philosophy recreationally because it renders life INTERESTING. I turn to Science for an understanding of how the physical world works; I turn to mystical religion (mainly zen) to see how life and death are ultimately worthwhile; I turn to literature and art for an aesthetic appreciation of the human condition.
Lustig Andrei
 
  1  
Reply Mon 8 Jul, 2013 05:03 pm
@JLNobody,
Sounds like you and I have remarkably similar reading habits, JL, right down to the Zen.
Lustig Andrei
 
  1  
Reply Mon 8 Jul, 2013 05:09 pm
@Lustig Andrei,
I read the Durant book when I was a freshman at university (on my own,not as required reading). As an undergrad upper classman I actually minored in Philosophy. Today, I no longer remember why. Except for certain treatises on mysticism, I now tend to avoid books of straight philosophy and wonder why I found it so fascinating when I was young.
Fil Albuquerque
 
  1  
Reply Mon 8 Jul, 2013 05:25 pm
@Lustig Andrei,
That declaration is surprising specially when matched to your signature and participation in this forum...but you are right nonetheless, the usefulness of formal philosophical studies is relative...philosophy should above all be a personnel commitment, not something that you go learn in a book and borrow.
0 Replies
 
Logicus
 
  0  
Reply Tue 23 Jul, 2013 01:50 pm
And also, don't limit yourself to one type of philosophy. Try to at least understand as many philosophies as you can, for they all, probably have some aspect to the Truth. Aristotle, Nietzsche, Plato, Aurelius, etc. all have some useful and good input on their views of nature.
0 Replies
 
 

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