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Socialists?

 
 
Reply Thu 17 Jan, 2013 03:37 pm
Greeting The Nazis were known as National Socialists. It is said that Hitler, and other leading Nazis, seduced big companies into supporting the Nazi Party, in return for favorable treatment with regard to legislation. This does not appear to be very "socialist". So why are they known as National Socialists? Thanks
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Type: Question • Score: 2 • Views: 633 • Replies: 5
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Setanta
 
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Reply Thu 17 Jan, 2013 03:49 pm
@Germanicus,
The people who founded the party probably believed in some form of socialism, but Hitler and company took it over. It was very much the vogue in the '20s and '30s to claim to be socialist--the Italian fascists did so. But it was just lip service.

See this Wikipedia article on the foundation of the National Socialists. One of the hallmarks of fascism and nazism was a combination of a socialist rhetoric with nationalism. Any notional socialist intention fell by the wayside in the face of political realities.
Germanicus
 
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Reply Thu 17 Jan, 2013 04:10 pm
@Setanta,
Sorry for stealing your knowledge. I am totally self-educated and rely on too many questions, to enrich my life. Thanks for your wisdom. Forgive typing errors, I find it hard to do two things at a time (a male problem!).
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Walter Hinteler
 
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Reply Fri 18 Jan, 2013 01:49 am
@Setanta,
Most think that the people, who founded the party, didn't believe in Socialism but only wanted to get party members from the working class. That's why the party origianally was called DAP (Deutsche Arbeiter Partei) [German Workers' Party].

When that got the 'NSDAP' in 1920, Hitler [and Eckart, Esser, Heß, Röhm, Feder] added the 'NS' to the party's name without informing the party's leaders. (The name was already used - though a bit differently - by an Austrian party, DNSAP.)
Setanta
 
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Reply Fri 18 Jan, 2013 03:37 am
@Walter Hinteler,
I'm not surprised. It was a scam of fascist parties throughout Europe to claim to be socialist and to claim to be concerned for the proletariat. Of course, their only concern was to gain power, by any means. The most notable characteristics of fascist parties were nationalism and militarism.
Walter Hinteler
 
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Reply Fri 18 Jan, 2013 04:02 am
@Setanta,
Between 1919 and late 1920's, there have been several racial ("völkisch") parties in Germany, which claimed to be "social" or "socialist": the Nationalsozialistische Freiheitspartei (National Socialist Freedom Party) [especially during the period after the 'Munich Putsch'], the Deutschsoziale Partei (German Social Party), the Deutschsozialistische Partei (German Socialist Party) ....
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