fresco
 
  2  
Reply Wed 5 Dec, 2012 09:50 am
@sozobe,
Quote:
"When I use a word," Humpty Dumpty said in a rather a scornful tone,"it means just what I choose it to mean --- neither more nor less."
"The question is," said Alice,"whether you can make words mean so many different things."
"The question is," said Humpty Dumpty, "which is to be master--- that's all."


Through the Looking Glass - Lewis Carroll
sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Dec, 2012 09:51 am
@fresco,
Yep! Very Happy
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Dec, 2012 12:06 pm
@sozobe,
You used the word; I had an immediate picture what he was doing.
Lustig Andrei
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Dec, 2012 04:21 pm
@roger,
roger wrote:

You used the word; I had an immediate picture what he was doing.


Me too.

I would suggest, though, that we must be careful not to confuse onomatopoeia with alliteration. A phrase such "the wild waters whooshed and whirled over the wide reach of the beach" contains only one certain onomatopoetic word: "whooshed", with "whirled" a border-line possibility. But the entire passage, of course, is alliterative.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Dec, 2012 04:37 pm
@Lustig Andrei,
I rather like [img]plotz[/img], but then I associate some meaning from the plot part.
0 Replies
 
Roberta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Dec, 2012 12:35 am
Thanks you guys for your contributions, poetic illuminations, and expanded discussions.

0 Replies
 
FBM
 
  2  
Reply Thu 6 Dec, 2012 08:03 am
In Korean:

mung mung : a dog barking

yaong yaong: meow

uhm-meh: moo

keck keck: quack quack
Roberta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Dec, 2012 05:03 pm
@FBM,
FBM, This was posted at the beginning of the thread:

Walter Hinteler wrote:

What I find very interesting is that the words are very similar in different languages - German wau-wau, French oua-oua, English woof-woof) - but the animals got totally different namens - Hund, chien, dog.

Edit: just found that this is called "cross-linguistic onomatopoeias".


It applies here as well.

I'm not surprised that words based on animal vocalizations are similar from language to language.
FBM
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Dec, 2012 12:59 am
@Roberta,
But... "mung mung" for a dog barking? Doesn't sound like anything I've heard in any other language. "Bow wow," "woof woof," etc. Not that I'm much of a polyglot, mind you.
Roberta
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Dec, 2012 02:19 am
@FBM,
FBM, I tried saying mung, mung out loud like a dog might bark it. It could work. On the other hand, maybe the theory of cross-linguistic onomatopoeia is wrong. Maybe animals do have accents.

Yes, I tried barking like a Korean dog.
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Dec, 2012 02:50 am
@Roberta,
I seem to recall that, in some cases, they do.

izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Dec, 2012 03:53 am
@dlowan,
Quote:
It's still not clear precisely how the human brain does all this, Bestelmeyer says. But, oddly enough, people who study birds think they may have some clues. That's because songbirds, like people, learn to vocalize early in life and develop regional accents. So research on bird brains could help explain what's going on in the human brain, says Jon Prather from the University of Wyoming.

Prather has studied the brains of swamp sparrows from Pennsylvania and New York, whose calls have subtle differences that are a lot like accents.

"We studied a region of the bird brain that is involved in not only how they sing their songs but how they perceive differences in their songs," he says. And that research found individual brain cells that would respond to one accent -- but not another.

So Prather and researchers from Duke University compared songbirds from Pennsylvania with songbirds from New York. They found specific brain cells in the Pennsylvania birds that responded to songs sung in their own accent, but they would stop firing when exposed to a New York accent.

"It would effectively shut down. It would not respond at all," he says.

All of which suggests that that songbirds from Pennsylvania and New York recognize each other's speech differences much the way human residents do, Prather says. And in nature, he adds, members of one group tend to be wary of members of another.


http://m.npr.org/story/131359561
Roberta
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Dec, 2012 04:20 am
@izzythepush,
Thanks, Iz. Fascinating stuff. I'm wondering if animals respond to speech patterns and accents in people.

Does a dawg from Noo Yawk recognize the difference when people not from Noo Yawk are speaking?

I'm off topic. But this is interesting.

izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Dec, 2012 04:23 am
@Roberta,
Don't know, but he probably recognises a different dog.
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Dec, 2012 04:33 am
@Roberta,
In the UK there's a brilliant show hosted by Stephen Fry called QI. They look a really obscure facts and common misconceptions. This is where they have a chat about WW2 accents.
0 Replies
 
 

 
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