cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Tue 10 Dec, 2013 09:46 pm
@cicerone imposter,
TODAY: December 10, 2013. With the budget deal in congress today, what's going to happen to the stock market tomorrow and the days following?
0 Replies
 
Ritika Sharma
 
  1  
Thu 2 Jan, 2014 12:54 am
U.S. stocks closed out their best year in more than 15 on Tuesday, with major indexes advancing throughout 2013 on the back of the Federal Reserve’s massive stimulus and expectations for accelerating growth going forward.
Wall Street ended 2013 with its positive momentum intact, advancing in its final trading day of the year on the back of positive consumer confidence data.The S&P 500 rose 29.6 percent over the year, its best annual performance since 1997, while the Dow climbed 26.5 percent in its best year since 1995. The Nasdaq jumped 38.3 percent, its best year since 2009.
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Mon 6 Jan, 2014 03:17 pm
@Ritika Sharma,
Good article.
Quote:
The Daily Ticker
Decline of U.S. foreign policy biggest risk of 2014, not economics: Ian Bremmer
By Aaron Task

Weakness in China's economy is the "major uncertainty" facing the globe in 2014, hedge fund titan George Soros declared last week.

That's wrong, acccording to Ian Bremmer, president of Eurasia Group, who says geopolitics, not economics, pose the biggest risks in 2014.

For the past five years the world has been alternatively -- and sometimes simultaneously -- worried about a meltdown in the eurozone, a hard-landing in China, Japan's debt burden, and America's debt ceiling and political dysfunction, Bremmer notes. "Every single one of those things has receded. Even my buddy Nouriel Roubini, 'Dr. Doom', says the economics are picking up. What remains and we are concerned about is that the geopolitics aren't good."

To be clear, Bremmer does not adhere to the idea that the U.S. is in 'terminal decline', a view that has gathered currency since the 2008 financial crisis. But "the commitment of the U.S. to allies abroad is absolutely in decline," he says. "U.S. foreign policy as a force that drives relationships and orientations of other countries around the world is absolutely in structural decline."

Related: The Myth of America's Decline: Why the 'Declinists' Are Wrong (Again)

While some countries -- like Israel, the U.K., Canada and Japan -- are inexorably linked to the U.S. for economic or security reasons (or both), many more -- including Germany, France, Turkey, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, Brazil, and Indonesia -- "all have governments that consider it unwise to align too closely with the U.S., and they are preparing to shift their international orientation accordingly," according to Bremmer.

There will be "very significant knock-on consequences" from this decline of U.S. foreign policy, he continues. For instance, defense manufacturers such as Lockheed Martin and Raytheon will face new challenges trying to sell arms abroad while tech giants Apple, Google and Yahoo (our corporate parent) will have a harder time doing business in Germany and France, "given concerns of NSA and Snowden," Bremmer says.
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Tue 7 Jan, 2014 02:17 pm
@cicerone imposter,
This means our trade deficit is decreasing, and I find nothing in macroeconomics that will change this scenario any time soon.

Quote:
SHRINKING DEFICIT: The U.S. trade deficit fell in November to its lowest level in four years, an encouraging sign for the economy. Gains in energy production and stronger sales of American-made airplanes, autos and machinery lifted exports to an all-time high, the Commerce Department said Tuesday.


Most of the GOP's doom and gloom about saving the auto industry seems to be the extreme of stupidity.

From Daily Kos.
Quote:
SUN AUG 01, 2010 AT 02:07 PM PDT
How the GOP saved the auto industry
byblackwaterdogFollow

They have no shame, and why would they. After all, they get away with every lie, so why not keep doing it?

Last year, when president Obama took what was almost a politically-suicidal decision to bailout GM and Chrysler, the RW went out of their already crazy mind. Sen. Bob Corker called Obama's actions "truly breathtaking" and said the government ownership roles at Chrysler and GM "should send a chill through all Americans who believe in free enterprise."
One year later, the lunatics are very quiet about the auto-industry comeback. But Bob Corker never met a lie he didn't like. From The Washington Post:

Corker says the administration's methods were "heavy-handed" but also takes credit for helping to shape the bailout. He prodded the Obama administration to force the companies to lessen their debt and achieve a more favorable union agreement.

"The ideas we laid out there were followed through," Corker said in an interview. "I take some pleasure out of helping make that contribution. . . . I think what we did is we forced a debate and we forced a hard look at these companies."

Yep. Not even a blink.
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Fri 24 Jan, 2014 02:30 pm
@cicerone imposter,
The stock market increased at new highs last year, 2013, and I sold 23% of my gains with the anticipation that it went too high, and the selling would take place later in the year. I thought too soon! It's now selling in January, and people's emotion will perpetuate this sell off from fear. I'm not sure how low it'll go, but my reserves from selling the gains will hold me over for at least two years. My gut feeling works pretty good when it comes down to my investments even though my timing might be a wee bit off. Mr. Green
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Fri 31 Jan, 2014 08:40 pm
@cicerone imposter,
We ended January 2014 with the worst performance in the stock market since 2012. I'm afraid we're going to see more selling come Monday forward that will drop the DOW, Nasdaq, and S&P even lower. I think corrections are good for the health of the stock market; it keeps people on their toes, and many learn the simple lesson that none can time the market no matter what tools they have at their beck and call.

If you ever listened to the financial pundits, they try to analyze each days ups and downs, but that's total bull shyt! There are too many variables that impacts the market that cannot be summarized on any day. Much of the buy and sell actions occur based on subjective guesses and emotion.

The best strategy is to have a mix of mutual funds that have performed well for the long-term. When investing, buy at regular intervals to average cost what you buy. When you sell, do the same; do it over a period of time rather than one or two sell orders. That way, you don't sell at the bottom or at the top; average.
0 Replies
 
Ritika Sharma
 
  1  
Sun 2 Feb, 2014 11:51 pm
In Friday’s session, energy and consumer discretionary shares had the biggest declines of the day after some disappointing earnings. The S&P energy index ended the day down 1.5 percent, while the consumer discretionary index fell 1.3 percent. Chevron Corp and Amazon.com were among the biggest drags.
The Dow Jones industrial average fell 149.76 points or 0.94 percent, to end at 15,698.85. The S&P 500 lost 11.60 points or 0.65 percent, to finish at 1,782.59.
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Tue 4 Feb, 2014 12:16 pm
@Ritika Sharma,
Here's my take on what's happening to the markets during the past month and part of February. Production, retail sales, and almost everything else will be much lower, because of how the weather has impacted all of those numbers.

Retail sales are going to go down when people are unable to travel to their shopping malls and stores because a) they lost their utilities, b) the roads were not safe to travel, and c) some stupid government official stops all traffic over the busiest bridge in the US.

Factories can't be operating at 100% when people can't get to work.

Most of the north-east suffered because of the climate. That's going to impact all manners of economic activities.

IMHO

I personally don't see that as all bad; we need to have some controls over the use of raw materials and energy.
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Tue 4 Feb, 2014 02:34 pm
@cicerone imposter,
This kind of climate will slow down any economy.
Quote:
Winter storm sweeps into U.S. Plains, 10 inches of snow expected
Reuters By Carey Gillam

Winter storm hits East, disrupts Super Bowl travel Associated Press
Snowstorm sweeps across Northeast, trapping Super Bowl fans Reuters
Southerners warned of icy mess in days ahead Associated Press
Winter storm brings 'once in decade' ice, snow to Southern states Reuters
Heavy snow, frigid temps take aim at eastern US Associated Press


KANSAS CITY, Missouri (Reuters) - An unusually heavy winter storm was blanketing Kansas with what forecasters said could be up to 10 inches of snow on Tuesday, and the deluge was expected to make a quick march eastward across the U.S. Midwest and into New England.

The band of heavy, wet snow forced the closing of many state offices and schools throughout the region, as authorities advised people to stay in their homes and the National Weather Service (NWS) warned of "extremely difficult travel conditions."
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Wed 5 Feb, 2014 02:50 pm
@cicerone imposter,
The market seems lost; it can't decide whether our economy is strong enough to weather the drop in production in China, the financial crisis in the Euro zone, and the drop in buy-backs by the feds.

Most companies reporting last quarter earnings are showing good profit margins.

Go figure.
0 Replies
 
Ritika Sharma
 
  1  
Fri 7 Mar, 2014 12:16 am
US stocks mostly rose on Thursday, with the S&P 500 closing at yet another record on better-than-expected jobless claims data and the European Central Bank’s move to keep rates unchanged.
The Dow Jones industrial average rose 61.71 points or 0.38 percent, to end at 16,421.89. The S&P 500 gained 3.22 points or 0.17 percent, to finish at 1,877.03. The Nasdaq Composite dropped 5.84 points or 0.13 percent, to close at 4,352.12.
0 Replies
 
Ritika Sharma
 
  1  
Fri 4 Apr, 2014 01:19 am
@cicerone imposter,
U.S. stocks slipped on Thursday, as investors turned cautious ahead of Friday’s monthly jobs report, while a drop in biotech and momentum shares dragged the Nasdaq down nearly 1 percent.
The Dow ended down just a fraction of a point, within about 4 points of its record closing high of 16,576.66 set on Dec. 31. The Dow posted an all-time intraday high during the session.
0 Replies
 
 

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