8
   

Fantasy & Science Fiction worth Reading/Re-reading

 
 
Noddy24
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Dec, 2007 02:07 pm
None of these books are Unforgettable Must Read Stories, but all are useful for wiling away an idle hour or evening.

Eric Flint with Virginia DeMarce: 1634: The Ram Rebellion.

The all-over title for this sprawling series is Ring of Fire. While the idea and framework are Eric Flint's there are a lot of willing sharecroppers on his Fiction Plantation, both on and off line.

http://www.baen.com/bar/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eric_Flint

In 1632 the opening volume, a coal-mining chunk of West Virginia is transported to 17th century Germany. Since then Flint and his co-authors have been documenting the practical and theoretical implications of this event throughout Europe.

Cherie Priest: Not Flesh nor Feathers

This is Ms. Priest third novel featuring Eden Moore, a reluctant medium. I liked the earlier installments better, but am willing to cut Ms. Priest some slack. While she was writing about a disastrous flooding of the Mississippi River at Chattanooga, Katrina hit New Orleans. Obviously a work of fiction isn't exploiting real life tragedy, but worry is not good for narrative flow.

I also have trouble believing in zombies.

www.cheriepriest.com

cmpriest.lovejournal.com

Wm. Mark Simmons: One Foot in the Grave.

This is another Vampires Walk Among Us yarn. The Hero has a propensity for quoting Great Works of English Literature. Delightful.

http://www.sff.net/people/wm.mark.simmons/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Mark_Simmons

Dave Freer: The Forlorn

I've mentioned Dave Freer as a co-author with Eric Flint and Mercedes Lackey. The Forlorn is a stand-alone first novel--a little rough, but a Good Read all the same.

http://www.doctormonkey.com/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dave_Freer
0 Replies
 
Noddy24
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Dec, 2007 08:06 am
Recommended Seasonal Reading:

Terry Pratchett: Hogfather

In the mythos of Discworld, the Hogfather is similar--but not identical--to Santa Claus and his roots extend way, way back in time.

Excerpts--for temptation and general PR:

Quote:
Chapter One


Everything starts somewhere, although many physicists disagree.

But people have always been dimly aware of the problem with the start of things. They wonder aloud how the snowplow driver gets to work, or how the makers of dictionaries look up the spelling of the words. Yet there is the constant desire to find some point in the twisting, knotting, raveling nets of space time on which a metaphorical finger can be put to indicate that here, here, is the point where it all began ...

Something began when the Guild of Assassins enrolled Mister Teatime, who saw things differently from other people, and one of the ways that he saw things differently from other people was in seeing other people as things (later, Lord Downey of the Guild said, "We took pity on him because he'd lost both parents at an early age. I think that, on reflection, we should have wondered a bit more about that").




Albert instructing DEATH (who is standing in for the Hogfather) about improving his "Ho, ho, ho."

Quote:
You got to put a bit of life in it, sir, no offense intended. it's got to be a big fat laugh. You got to...you got t sound like you're pissing brandy and crapping plum pudding, sir, excuse my Klatchian."



DEATH is doing a stint at a very upscale department store. He arrived in his sleigh, pulled by four tusked boars.

Quote:
"Are you weal?" said the bobble hat?

"WHAT DO YOU THINK?"

The bobble hat sniggered. "I saw your piggy do a wee!"



No more time--just a hearty recommendation.
0 Replies
 
Noddy24
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Dec, 2007 02:42 pm
Sad news:

Terry Pratchett has a form of Alzeheimer's.

http://entertainment.timesonline.co.uk/tol/arts_and_entertainment/books/article3042608.ece
0 Replies
 
Noddy24
 
  1  
Reply Sun 16 Dec, 2007 11:58 am
Jo Walton: The King's Peace and The King's Name

Jo Walton is an author with a broad assortment of stories. This duology deals with a semi-Arthurian world in a parallel universe with deeds of derring do and clashings of tribal cultures and religions and the passions of imperfect people.

The books were published in 2000 and 2001, but all the same I was reminded of the situation in Afghanistan.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jo_Walton

http://www.zorinth.net/bluejo/

http://journals.aol.com/johnmscalzi/bytheway/entries/2006/09/27/your-wednesday-author-interview-jo-walton/6538
0 Replies
 
Noddy24
 
  1  
Reply Tue 26 Feb, 2008 08:59 am
I haven't posted for two months.

I've been enduring the dark of the year by reading murder mysteries and third or sixth or more volume installments of long-running adventure stories.

While I've enjoyed these tales of derring do enormously, I've hesitated to recommend that someone else invest great chunks of time reading 700 page installments of six volume yarns.

My "real" life can be a bit tedious and I'm unabashedly fond of escape reading.

An excellent author is Jane Lindskold, particularly her series featuring Firekeeper, a girl raised by "Royal" wolves who moves through a variety of fictional cultures with a great deal of style.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jane_Lindskold

Her website offers sample chapters.

http://www.janelindskold.com/

Currently I'm skimming the early volumes of John Ringo's The Council Wars. The story is a little preposterous, but the details--particularly the military subplots are absolutely real.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Ringo

Another multi-volume opus is Jim Butcher's Codex Alera series.
His Dresden Files are better known, but I'm more partial to epic fantasy than supernatural supersleuths. (There is a spirited fan backing for Harry Dresden's adventures).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jim_Butcher

http://www.jim-butcher.com/

Sharyn McCrumb's books are shelved with mysteries rather than science fiction, but her Ballad Series draws on Appalachian folklore and the ghosts echo the current problems.

http://www.sharynmccrumb.com/ballad_overview.asp

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sharyn_McCrumb
0 Replies
 
herb Salter
 
  1  
Reply Tue 3 Jun, 2008 04:00 pm
I am suprised that there has been no mention of David Gemmells novels.

Legend still represents everything a fantasy book should be to me.

I wonder if others have read his work?
0 Replies
 
Noddy24
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Jun, 2008 10:15 am
Herb--

Welcome to A2K.

I agree with you about David Gemmell--Legend is a wonderful yarn and all of Gemmell's books move along briskly.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Gemmell

http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/g/david-a-gemmell/
0 Replies
 
aperson
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Jul, 2008 02:41 am
If you're into SF, or philosophy of any kind, I'd highly recommend Genesis by Bernard Beckett.
0 Replies
 
Noddy24
 
  1  
Reply Sat 5 Jul, 2008 03:52 am
Aperson--

I just checked Amazon and Bernard Beckett isn't easily accessible in the States right now.
0 Replies
 
aperson
 
  1  
Reply Sat 5 Jul, 2008 04:09 am
Yea that's probably because hes (hes or he's?) a New Zealand author. If you do get the chance though, I suggest you read it. It's not very long or complicated (aimed at young adults) but it's very thought-provoking. Gave me new views on life, artificial intelligence and society.
0 Replies
 
Noddy24
 
  1  
Reply Sat 5 Jul, 2008 04:50 am
He's due to be published--and his earlier book will be reissued--down the road a bit.
0 Replies
 
aperson
 
  1  
Reply Sat 5 Jul, 2008 05:32 am
You've got quite an extensive list here. I shall definitely refer to it when comes the time of my next book choice.
0 Replies
 
aperson
 
  1  
Reply Sat 5 Jul, 2008 05:40 am
I don't think you'd enjoy them, but just for the record, Alastair Reynolds' Revelation Space novels are quite interesting, just for the theories. The characters are all depressing, as is the setting, and the plots could use a little touch up, but if you are prepared to stretch your imagination to an almost unbearable degree, the concepts are mind-blowing.
0 Replies
 
Noddy24
 
  1  
Reply Sat 5 Jul, 2008 08:59 am
You have me pegged about Alastair Reynolds. I'm addicted to optimism in my leisure reading.
0 Replies
 
aperson
 
  1  
Reply Sat 5 Jul, 2008 06:06 pm
? Sorry, "pegged"?
0 Replies
 
Noddy24
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Jul, 2008 01:48 am
Aperson--

"Pegged"

Square pegs, round holes? Nope.

You slotted the irregularly shaped person into an irregularly shaped hole in the pegboard.

Congratulations.
0 Replies
 
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Wed 9 Jul, 2008 03:38 pm
I picked up Neal Stephenson's Cryptonomicon at the used bookstore yesterday, and I was hooked by page 2.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cryptonomicon

http://books.slashdot.org/article.pl?no_d2=1&sid=99/06/23/139229

He also authored Snow Crash in 1992.

http://books.slashdot.org/article.pl?no_d2=1&sid=99/06/23/139229
0 Replies
 
Noddy24
 
  1  
Reply Fri 11 Jul, 2008 09:45 am
Drew Dad--

You have some good reading ahead.
0 Replies
 
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Sun 10 Aug, 2008 02:44 pm
in honour of noddy, i hope this thread will continue, i got some good recommendations here
0 Replies
 
Rockhead
 
  1  
Reply Sun 10 Aug, 2008 03:13 pm
Me, too, DJ.

This was one of my favorite places to read Miss Noddy.

She was so multi-faceted.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

 
Copyright © 2014 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.06 seconds on 04/19/2014 at 01:16:47