38
   

Ask the A2K cooks!

 
 
Rockhead
 
  1  
Reply Mon 30 Jan, 2012 07:39 pm
@ehBeth,
that's the one...

downright tasty it is.

smoky will be appreciating you tomorrow...
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Mon 30 Jan, 2012 08:00 pm
@Rockhead,
Very Happy

(google is our friend)
0 Replies
 
CalamityJane
 
  1  
Reply Mon 30 Jan, 2012 08:19 pm
@msolga,
Well, thank you for the compliment, but I don't do turkey.
It's just not flavorful enough for me and I just don't like it. So I have no
recipe, sorry MsOlga.
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Tue 31 Jan, 2012 02:32 am
@CalamityJane,
No need to apologies, Jane.
I understand.
You're either a turkey fan or you're not! Wink
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Tue 31 Jan, 2012 02:33 am
@Rockhead,
Thanks for putting the enchilada idea into EhBeth's head, Rocky.
Now I have another option to consider!
0 Replies
 
Roberta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 31 Jan, 2012 02:34 am
@msolga,
I'm a dark meat turkey fan.
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Tue 31 Jan, 2012 02:40 am
@Roberta,
Ah!
Another turkey opinion.
Looks like this a very polarizing issue! Wink

How do you usually cook yours, Roberta?
Roberta
 
  2  
Reply Tue 31 Jan, 2012 03:43 am
@msolga,
I cook turkey thigh with the bone in.

Dump the thigh in a fair-sized roasting pan.

Sprinkle the turkey with salt, pepper, and paprika. Sprinkle a lot of garlic powder on top. (I tried garlic flakes and chopped garlic. I like the powder best.)

Add two cups of cold water to the pan.

Put the pan in a 350 degree oven.

Baste every 15 minutes or so.

I usually make some packaged stuffing, using the juices from the pan. You can skip this part.

After about 90 minutes, I check to see if the turkey is done. I do this by sticking something way down inside the thigh. If the juices flow pink, it ain't done. If the juices flow clear, it's done.

I make gravy from the juices in the pan. Pour out what you won't need. Add salt and pepper. Cook until the juices come to a boil. Then add some flour to thicken up the gravy. Stir--and add more flour if the gravy is too watery.

Slice the turkey. Add the gravy. And eat.
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Tue 31 Jan, 2012 03:54 am
@Roberta,
Thank you, Roberta!

I really didn't intend to put you to so much trouble.
I thought you'd just say you roasted it, or something like that.

But now that you have gone to the trouble, that information will be very useful to a turkey-challenged person. Smile

And thanks for the gravy advice.
Would you believe I'm gravy-challenged, too? Smile
Wrong culture, not enough roasting history under my belt.

Question: do you ever do the "resting" thing before carving & serving?
With me it depends on how hungry I am. Smile
But I have it on excellent A2K cooks' authority (from another thread) that a rest does wonders for any roast!
Roberta
 
  2  
Reply Tue 31 Jan, 2012 09:09 am
@msolga,
olga, This isn't officially roasted. It's cooking in water.

I let red meats rest. I don't bother with turkey, but I guess it couldn't hurt. Maybe you could let the boid rest while you're making the gravy. I make the gravy while I'm carving.

msolga
 
  1  
Reply Tue 31 Jan, 2012 04:34 pm
@Roberta,
Quote:
olga, This isn't officially roasted. It's cooking in water.

Yes, I see that now, Roberta.
Sorry for my irrelevant question. Wink
0 Replies
 
InfraBlue
 
  4  
Reply Tue 31 Jan, 2012 05:16 pm
The more authentic enchilada sauce recipes call for dried chiles and no tomato sauce. Here's a recipe from Rick Bayless that calls for a mix of Ancho and Guajillo chiles.

Red Enchilada Sauce Recipe:

4 clove garlic, unpeeled
4 medium dried chiles guajillos
6 medium dried chiles anchos
1/4 tsp black pepper
1/4 tsp cumin seeds
2 cups any poultry broth, plus a little more if needed.
Salt, abt 1 tsp
Sugar 1 pinch if needed

http://foodtravails.blogspot.com/2008/03/mexican-series4-red-enchilada-sauce.html
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 31 Jan, 2012 06:15 pm
@InfraBlue,
Thanks for that link, InfraB., adding it to what I call my flogs.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 31 Jan, 2012 06:17 pm
@Roberta,
I like sorta poached turkey. I did something like that around New Year's - though I poached the turkey in vegetable cocktail and salsa. It's a good way to get instant leftovers Very Happy
0 Replies
 
Rockhead
 
  1  
Reply Tue 31 Jan, 2012 06:20 pm
@InfraBlue,
that looks like the secret recipe my mexican girlfriend would never give me.

hafta remember it when I go to the lil' mamacita market in the hood...
Sturgis
 
  1  
Reply Fri 3 Feb, 2012 02:29 pm
@Rockhead,
Quote:
that looks like the secret recipe my mexican girlfriend would never give me.

hafta remember it when I go to the lil' mamacita market in the hood...



Now how is he gonna remember a recipe he was never given...

...this is too dang confusing even for a chocoholic like me...
CalamityJane
 
  2  
Reply Fri 3 Feb, 2012 04:07 pm
@Sturgis,
Sturgis wrote:
..this is too dang confusing even for a chocoholic like me...


Tell me about it! I just ate a half a jar of Nutella Embarrassed
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Fri 9 Mar, 2012 11:54 pm
@CalamityJane,
You didn't really, did you, Jane? Surprised

Very Happy



Some weeks ago, I posted on some A2K thread about cooking chicken by the steeped method. I thought it was this thread, but apparently it wasn't.

Anyway, I'd cooked a chicken using this method & found the results to be delicious and particularly succulent. I have a vague recollection of offering to post another recipe using this technique ... so here's one. By one of my favourite, no nonsense Oz/Chinese cooks: Kylie Kwong. She's terrific! Her recipees are guaranteed to work.
This one will be my next "steeped" effort.

So here's one of Kylie Kwong's steeped chicken recipes, whether I actually said I'd post it or not! Wink :


Quote:
White-Cooked Chicken
Recipe by Kylie Kwong from Kylie Kwong: Simply Magic

http://www.lifestylefood.com.au/content/cache/400x225/Recipes/Thumbnails/1367.jpg

I could eat this dish four times a week – the texture is so silky and I love the savoury flavours.

The poaching and steeping technique used in this recipe is perfect for cooking chicken, as it is very gentle; the integrity of the chicken is preserved, and the result is moist, tender flesh. The heating of the peanut oil is vital to release its beautiful, nutty flavour and bring out the aroma of the soy and ginger.

Ingredients

1 free range chicken
2 tablespoons Peanut Oil
1/3 cup finely sliced spring onion plus extra to garnish
½ teaspoon cane Sugar
1 teaspoon Sesame Oil
1 tablespoon finely sliced Ginger plus extra to garnish
60 ml shoyu or Soy sauce

White Master Stock

6 L COLD Water
3 cups shao hsing wine OR DRY SHERRY
8 spring onions Trimmed and cut in half crossways
12 Cloves Garlic crushed
1¼ cups sliced Ginger
1/3 cup sea salt


Method

1 ..Rinse chicken under cold water.
2..Trim away excess fat from inside and outside cavity, but keep neck, parson’s nose and winglets intact.
3..Lower chicken, breast-side down, into simmering stock, ensuring it is fully submerged.
4..Poach chicken gently for exactly 14 minutes.
5..There should be no more than an occasional ripple breaking the surface; adjust the temperature, if necessary, to ensure stock does not reach simmering point again. Remove stockpot immediately from the stove and allow chicken to steep in the stock for 3 hours at room temperature to complete the cooking process.
6..Using tongs, gently remove chicken from the stock, being careful not to tear the breast skin.
7..Place chicken on a tray to drain and allow to cool.
8..For dressing, combine all ingredients except for peanut oil in a heat-proof bowl. Heat peanut oil in a saucepan, then pour over dressing ingredients and stir to combine.
9..With a large knife or cleaver, cut up the chicken Chinese, arrange on a platter and drizzle over the dressing.
10..Garnish with extra spring onions and ginger. Serve immediately.

White Master Stock

1..Place all stock ingredients in a large stockpot and bring to the boil.
2..Reduce heat and simmer gently for 40 minutes to allow the flavours to infuse.

Always use the best- quality chicken – you might pay slightly more, but you’ll appreciate the difference, and the accompanying ingredients cost little.


http://www.lifestylefood.com.au/recipes/329/whitecooked-chicken
Rockhead
 
  1  
Reply Fri 9 Mar, 2012 11:57 pm
@msolga,
how does one cut up the chicken Chinese?

I like recipes that call for a cleaver...
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sat 10 Mar, 2012 12:04 am
@Rockhead,
I don't use a cleaver, Rocky.
But you could! Smile
I just cut up the chicken in any way that suits me ... like I'd cut up a roast chicken, for example.

The interesting thing about this (& other such recipes) recipe is how little actual cooking time is involved, as opposed to steeping in the liquid.

I was rather dubious at first, but it actually works. Brilliantly.

And it "keeps" well in the fridge for later, too.
0 Replies
 
 

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