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What do these bumper stickers mean??

 
 
Reply Sat 23 Sep, 2006 01:54 pm
I keep seeing these stickers on people's cars, and I can't come up with a meaning. They are usually oval, white with black letters and a black line around the border, with several capital letters in them. I don't recognize the combinations of any of the letters, and I don't recall seeing 2 stickers alike.

Does anyone know what these mean? Question
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Type: Discussion • Score: 3 • Views: 23,806 • Replies: 24
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Swimpy
 
  1  
Reply Sat 23 Sep, 2006 02:06 pm
I know they're European, but that's about it. I found a website that has them for sale. This is not a plug. http://www.cafepress.com/ovalstickers/407106
patiodog
 
  1  
Reply Sat 23 Sep, 2006 02:08 pm
Yeah, it's a takeoff on the European nation-identifying markers (though not all of those are that plain, I think -- doesn't Denmark or Deutschland or somebody have theirs on a blue field with yellow stars?).
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EmilyGreen
 
  1  
Reply Sat 23 Sep, 2006 02:11 pm
Well that's kinda lame. Do they expect people to understand what they've put all over their cars? Isn't that the point of a bumper sticker?

Thanks for the info, at least I know now. None of my searches for those things came up with anything.
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Francis
 
  2  
Reply Sat 23 Sep, 2006 02:18 pm
Well, they are not only European but international...

look here:

International car codes
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Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Sat 23 Sep, 2006 02:24 pm
Francis wrote:
Well, they are not only European but international...

look here:

International car codes


The US-Americans must have USA on it, btw, when traveling to foreign country ...
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patiodog
 
  1  
Reply Sat 23 Sep, 2006 04:08 pm
Nobody seems to care (or even know) in Canada or Mexico, if that's the case.
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sat 23 Sep, 2006 04:26 pm
patiodog wrote:
Nobody seems to care (or even know) in Canada or Mexico, if that's the case.


That might well be so.

However, Canada, Mexico, USA ... actually all countries signed and ratified the Convention on Road Traffic, which dates back to 1949 and originates even earlier in treaties made in ealiest 20th century.
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hamburger
 
  1  
Reply Sat 23 Sep, 2006 04:33 pm
quite a few years ago - before the european union started - , we flew into amsterdam , picked up a car and drove to germany .
while in hamburg i decided to drive into the "freeport" , which meant having to pass customs . the customs-officer stopped me and wanted to know why a dutch licensed car was being driven in germany WITHOUT the appropriate sticker for netherland ; i believe it's NL ?
anyway , the customs-officer sold me a NL sticker for 2 marks , affixed it to the car and i was now free drive on Very Happy .
hbg
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patiodog
 
  1  
Reply Sat 23 Sep, 2006 04:34 pm
ah. according to wikipedia...

Quote:
In practice, the requirement to display the white oval is mutually waived between some countries, for example between many European countries (where the white oval may be substituted by a blue strip on the vehicle registration plate) and between Canada, the United States and Mexico (where the state or province of registration is usually embossed on the vehicle registration plate).
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sat 23 Sep, 2006 04:40 pm
The number plates of the EU-member countries have the national car code intergrated in the European enblem on the number plate.
But: if people choose to use the non-EU plate (which many, especially in the UK do), they must show their country sign.
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nimh
 
  1  
Reply Sun 24 Sep, 2006 12:49 pm
When I was a kid, and we were camping in South-Limburg by the Belgian and German borders, whenever us kids got bored during our walks through the hills and forests we'd count where cars would come from (yes, you can blame that for my current obsession with statistics).

Seriously, I think all the kids have (had?) this thing, like - oh! That car is from France! Cool! Or if there's a car with an unknown abbreviation on the sticker: where could they come from?
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 24 Sep, 2006 01:16 pm
You know how long it took me to learn all the new abbriviations from East Europe ...

(And our "new game" until recently was, which car from what country was getting damaged cars from what other country for "fixing" home Laughing )
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squinney
 
  1  
Reply Sun 24 Sep, 2006 01:35 pm
In NC, part of the pretty green part of the country Very Happy , I've been seeing them and wondering the same thing. I kept seeing different letters, so couldn't figure out what the heck it was. Finally, one day last week, I pulled up close enough to one parked to read it.

Under OBX, in very small letters it said "Outer Banks, NC."
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sun 24 Sep, 2006 02:22 pm
nimh wrote:
When I was a kid, and we were camping in South-Limburg by the Belgian and German borders, whenever us kids got bored during our walks through the hills and forests we'd count where cars would come from (yes, you can blame that for my current obsession with statistics).

Seriously, I think all the kids have (had?) this thing, like - oh! That car is from France! Cool! Or if there's a car with an unknown abbreviation on the sticker: where could they come from?


Oh yeah--there's forty-eight states in the contiguous United States, so we used to play a game on long trips of identifying "foreign" license plates (i.e., from another state), with the "winner" being he or she who had seen and confirmed the most plates from another state (only works if you're driving for a long time in one state--but outside New England, it is very common that one drives for hours in one state).

Additionally, this game was entertaining to small kids from one year to the next, because states used to issue new license plates each year, rather than stickers which went on the plates, and the color patterns of the plates would change.
urs53
 
  1  
Reply Sun 24 Sep, 2006 02:26 pm
Of course, I know these stickers from Europe. But I have seen them more and more in the US and like Squinney says, they stand for a certain area or county or something. The abbreviations don't always make sense, I think...
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nimh
 
  2  
Reply Sun 24 Sep, 2006 03:32 pm
urs53 wrote:
The abbreviations don't always make sense, I think...

They sometimes dont seem to make sense (to us) because they are sometimes derived from the language of the country. Eg, Spain is "E" because the E stands for Espana, and Croatia is "HR" because Croatia in Croatian is Hrvatska.

It's inconsistent though, because although Finland in Finnish is Suomi, and Hungary in Hungarian is Magyarorszag, the codes are FIN and H..
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Tico
 
  1  
Reply Sun 24 Sep, 2006 03:49 pm
I see quite a few of them around Toronto, and I doubt that so many European visitors are shipping their cars here. It must cost a lot of money to do that. In fact, since most of the stickered cars are quite average and have Canadian licence plates, I suspect that it's simply showing pride of heritage.

That's c Cool l, it gives me something to do while waiting in traffic.
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patiodog
 
  1  
Reply Sun 24 Sep, 2006 03:58 pm
I bought a car from a Scots girl who was going back home. I sported her Scottish pride around town for a year or so, before the engine compartment burst into flame.


Damn Scots witch...
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farah79
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Nov, 2006 03:08 pm
They are European
I am from Spain, which is (E)
S is for Sweden, not Spain
D is Germany, stands for Deutschland
GB is Great Britain
I Italy
DK Denmark

Those are the ones I know off the top of my head...
0 Replies
 
 

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