2
   

Hey, Ma, what's for supper?

 
 
Reply Wed 6 Nov, 2002 09:59 pm
Looking for quick and easy dinner ideas. After all these years, I'm tired of thinking up new stuff and sick of the old stuff. Tonight we had quiche (except I didn't make it -- I bought it). Shortcuts are welcome (i.e. frozen foods, etc.). Anybody got any easy favorites they'd like to share?
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Discussion • Score: 2 • Views: 6,378 • Replies: 41
No top replies

 
Craven de Kere
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Nov, 2002 10:04 pm
Stroganoff on pasta!
0 Replies
 
bandylu2
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Nov, 2002 10:09 pm
As in, make from scratch stroganoff, Craven? Got a recipe? I like it over noodles.
0 Replies
 
Craven de Kere
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Nov, 2002 10:14 pm
Umm, I just use premade sauce. I can't recommend a brand because the one I use isn't sold stateside.

But it should be pretty easy even from scratch. I hope Jerry has a recipe for us.
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Nov, 2002 10:19 pm
Ah, since you're here, Bandlu, and talking about food, let me get a recommendation from you. My old "non-stick T-Fal chicken has bitten the dust so far as non stick is concerned, and I'm keeping an eye out for a skillet, frying pan, or another chicken fryer. Should I go with stanless and scour it clean, or try for another non-stick? What's a good coating or brand? Durability of the non stick surface is more important than price, since I'm not looking for a set.
0 Replies
 
bandylu2
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Nov, 2002 10:28 pm
I think maybe Jerry can answer that one, too, roger. I've had little luck with buying proper pans. Recently bought some expensive ones without non-stick coating (so I could start cooking on top of stove and then move to the oven). They were also supposed to not stick (though no coating), but they do. And I can't put them in the dishwasher which also annoys me. My expensive teflon pans are all about ready for the garbage -- coating has started to come off. I still have some stainless steel pots that my mother-in-law gave me when we got married (they were hand me downs that she'd used for years) so can't complain about them. I have a smooth cooktop and have to make sure I get flat pans or they wobble.

Basically, I have no idea.
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Nov, 2002 10:32 pm
That was honest. Every few years they come out with a new way of saying teflon. I sort of think they're saying "Okay, we lied, but this time we mean it."
0 Replies
 
Craven de Kere
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Nov, 2002 10:35 pm
Roger,

Have you tried ceramics?
0 Replies
 
sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Nov, 2002 10:43 pm
We got a bunch of Revereware stainless steel pans for our wedding, 6+ years ago, and I LOVE 'em.
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Nov, 2002 10:45 pm
Ceramics never crossed my mind. Is that a recommendation? I haven't even seen it advertised except as ovenware.

I was really excited (doesn't take much, huh?) by the titanium finishes on some of the stuff in the Chef's catalog, but decided they were talking about the outside of the pan, about which I could care less.
0 Replies
 
bandylu2
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Nov, 2002 10:47 pm
I think (and I'm not positive) that the titanium makes it a good, even heat conductor which will affect the cooking.

Revereware has always been one of the better brands -- never had any though so I'll have to take sozobe's word for it.
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Nov, 2002 10:49 pm
Really, soz? Maybe I've been buying into the teflon just for the advertising propaganda. Maybe it's back to basics time. The teflon has been a real disappointment once it starts to wear off.
0 Replies
 
mckenzie
 
  1  
Reply Thu 7 Nov, 2002 12:15 am
Revereware is great. I replaced my old seat of cookware in about 1989 with Revereware and it's still going strong. So, good news for you, sozobe.

I use electric skillets coated with teflon for anything stir-fried or sauted, for chili, etc. etc. When the coating starts to wear, I replace them. It's worth it, 'cause they're so versatile
0 Replies
 
mckenzie
 
  1  
Reply Thu 7 Nov, 2002 12:34 am
Bandylu, I've become the queen of quick and easy.

My latest acquisition: a rotisserie. It's the easiest thing in the world. A 4 lb. chicken, a homemade rub or bbq sauce, perfectly done in an hour, while I steam some rice and throw together a salad.

A sirloin roast with a rub or a prime rib coated with garlic and spices, 20 minutes a pound, potatoes cut in chunks roasting on the drip tray under the meat.

I could go on and on ...
0 Replies
 
mckenzie
 
  1  
Reply Thu 7 Nov, 2002 12:48 am
I bought a Crockpot when they first came out in the 70s, tried a couple of things and never used it again. I finally got rid of it for a buck or two at a garage sale years ago. Last year I bought a new one, plus a couple of recipe books. I use it all the time. Pot roast, beef dip, stew, shredded pork, pork ribs, chicken, cabbage rolls, you name it. It's so easy because once you've thrown it in, in the morning, it's hands off 'till suppertime.

We were spending so much money on eating out or takeout because I was bored with the same old, same old and don't have much time to cook. The appliances have been well worth the money.
0 Replies
 
jespah
 
  1  
Reply Thu 7 Nov, 2002 07:06 am
This thread: http://www.able2know.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=189

contains an easy (although not super-quick) recipe. Id' recommend cooking it on a weekend night, preferably when the temperature outside is cool, as it will heat up the kitchen and fill it with yummy aromas. My Mom reports she made it the other day and it came out wonderfully. The best thing, to my mind, is you do almost nothing, yet you end up with this extraordinary meal. Plus there are only 2 articles to clean (from cooking the main dish; I can't comment on what you would cook for sides) - the roasting pan and the rack.
0 Replies
 
JerryR
 
  1  
Reply Thu 7 Nov, 2002 12:00 pm
Hi All,

(can't stay long,...cooking for fifty for 5pm Twisted Evil )

Roger, as far as pans go:
I can't think of anything better than a good heavy cast-iron covered fryer for chicken,..once you season those pans they are as nonstick as anything else.
There was a mention of titanium,..which is also very good. I do some product testing in my free (yeah, right!) time at home. Just finished a three month testing of a set of anodized aluminum/titanium pans,..they're great,...I think you can get a full set at BJ's Wholesale for around $160.00,..I kept mine Very Happy

Back later on,..must go bone the ducks!

That sounds dirty, doesn't it? Laughing
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Thu 7 Nov, 2002 01:53 pm
Thanks so much Jerry. Anodized aluminum/titanium pans sound a lot like what I saw in the Chef's catalog, but I'll check out BJ's Wholesale if they have an internet presence. With the prices at Chef's, I'm lucky not to be needing a set of anything. I just want to do a hamburger with as little fuss as possible.

Cast iron is great, I know, but I really don't want to handle the weight if I don't have to. Season it? Sounds familiar, but I don't recall the procedure.
0 Replies
 
husker
 
  1  
Reply Thu 7 Nov, 2002 02:49 pm
Potware
We have some Martha Stewart Stainless Steel, and it seems to work very good, well maybe it'll become a collectable when she gets out of jail?? Embarrassed
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Thu 7 Nov, 2002 02:51 pm
Always a silver lining, huh, Husker?
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

 
  1. Forums
  2. » Hey, Ma, what's for supper?
Copyright © 2014 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.09 seconds on 07/22/2014 at 03:18:09