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Dual-Citizenship in Scotland

 
 
Reply Sat 30 Jul, 2005 12:41 pm
I was wondering about the rules for dual-citizenship in Scotland. My great Grandmother was born there, which I think entitles me to apply for citizenship there. I also have a Great Grandmother from Ireland, which I know I could het a dual-citizenship from, after doing all the paperwork, lol!
I was just wondering if the process is about the same for Scotland?
Any ideas or links?
Thanx,
Michael Laughing
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Type: Discussion • Score: 7 • Views: 56,001 • Replies: 30

 
ConstitutionalGirl
 
  1  
Reply Thu 4 Aug, 2005 07:55 am
My Grammy is a full blooded Scotish Woman, because both of her parents were full blooded Scotish Immigrant's from Scotland. So her, her children, her Grandchildren, and her Great-Grand Children, should entitle dual-citizenship. How can we do this? Are there sites with information on this?
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Thu 4 Aug, 2005 09:06 am
Well, Scotland is part of the United Kingdom and immigration laws are the same all over that country.

So, both of you may have a look at the Home Office's site BN18 - Information about dual nationality
0 Replies
 
KiwiChic
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Aug, 2005 10:15 pm
you can have dual citizenship through a Grandparent at the most, but they have to be born before a certain year, I cant remember what the year was.
0 Replies
 
ktflyer
 
  1  
Reply Wed 31 May, 2006 09:25 am
Dual Citizenship with Sotland
I am a US citizen and was wanting to get a dual citizenship with Scotland, Ireland, or England..... Is that possible?
0 Replies
 
ffydownunder
 
  1  
Reply Thu 8 Jun, 2006 02:18 am
United Kingdom Immigration Law is one of the most strict in the world. The United Kingdom (UK) covers England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland. (The Republic of) Ireland is a different country and has it's own Immigration law


In order to be eligble for UK Citizenship you must have lived there for a minimum number of years (depending on circumstances)

Commonwealth Nationals(List of Commonwealth Countries) who have a grandparent who was born in the UK may enter the UK for a period of five years on a UK ancestry visa. This ancestry visa will open up the entire job market to you and will not carry the restrictions of a UK work permit.

You will have to prove your relationship, and this may require spending a lot of time hunting for old marriage certificates, birth certificates, etc.

The main criteria are that you are able to support yourself without access to public funds and are willing and able to work. It is advantageous, but not necessary, to have a firm offer of employment in the UK.

After five years continuous stay in the UK on an Ancestry visa you may apply for permanent residency as long as you still meet the requirements for the Ancestry visa and you have spent five years in employment in the UK without a break.

Once permanent residence (properly known as indefinite leave to remain) has been granted there are no time limits on your stay in the UK.

You should note that to keep your permanent residence you should not spend longer than two years outside the UK. You should maintain ties to the UK and should consider the UK as your home. If you continue to only spend short periods of time in the UK over many years it is likely that there will come a time when you will lose your indefinite leave to remain in the UK. It is therefore beneficial in most cases to apply for UK citizenship. You can normally apply for naturalisation as an UK citizen one year after being granted indefinite leave to remain and as long as you meet the residence requirements.

You will need to meet the following requirements to apply for naturalisation:

You must be aged 18 or over and are not of unsound mind.
You must be of good character.
You should be able to communicate in the English language (or Welsh or Scottish Gaelic). There are exemptions to this requirement, for example if you are elderly or mentally handicapped.
You should intend to live in the UK or in Crown Service abroad (working directly for an UK Government organisation), or be employed by an international organisation of which the UK is a member, or be employed by a company or association established in the United Kingdom.


As of November 1, 2005, you also have to pass the UK government's new Life in the UK test before you can apply for citizenship.
0 Replies
 
McTag
 
  3  
Reply Thu 8 Jun, 2006 02:25 am
We don't let just anyone in.

How many pints of beer can you drink before falling over?
ffydownunder
 
  1  
Reply Thu 8 Jun, 2006 02:27 am
the more you can drink, the further north you get to live!!!

those soft southerners were always lightweights!
0 Replies
 
material girl
 
  2  
Reply Thu 8 Jun, 2006 03:58 am
ffydownunder wrote:
the more you can drink, the further north you get to live!!!

those soft southerners were always lightweights!


I have a good few friends that could drink you Scots under the table.
0 Replies
 
ffydownunder
 
  1  
Reply Fri 16 Jun, 2006 01:16 pm
not me........... Wink

i was in a pipe band! part of our competition points are awarded on how much you can drink and still parade and play on the field! needless to say my lot won the worlds, europes, nationals and locals in the same year!

ma brother on the other hand.... lightweight!!!
0 Replies
 
aw316
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Jun, 2006 01:20 pm
working visa/ extended visa
After I graduate from college here in the US, I would like to teach in Scotland- maybe even go to grad school there. Obviously If I was admitted into a University, I would be allowed to live there at least until I completed the degree- but if I decided I wanted to live and teach there- what processes would I have to go through to live there 1,2 or more years? Plus- my grandmother recently married a Scotsman...even though she is an American- does that benefit my situation?
ktflyer
 
  2  
Reply Mon 10 Jul, 2006 02:53 pm
Thanx for the info.... Looks like I've got allot of digging to do.... I know I have a great grandmother from Italy but, I don't think thats going to help me very much...And as for you McTag, I'll drink you under the table any day... Us "Southern" girls are crazy!
0 Replies
 
McTag
 
  2  
Reply Mon 10 Jul, 2006 03:05 pm
I accept that challenge. Laughing
0 Replies
 
ktflyer
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Jul, 2006 07:54 am
Ok then, I'll let you know when I'm in England and we'll go at it..... Touché
0 Replies
 
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Jul, 2006 11:14 am
Re: working visa/ extended visa
aw316 wrote:
After I graduate from college here in the US, I would like to teach in Scotland- maybe even go to grad school there. Obviously If I was admitted into a University, I would be allowed to live there at least until I completed the degree- but if I decided I wanted to live and teach there- what processes would I have to go through to live there 1,2 or more years? Plus- my grandmother recently married a Scotsman...even though she is an American- does that benefit my situation?


If a foreign national completes a course at a Scottish university he/she is entitled to live in the country for a while afterwards...I think it is at least two years.
0 Replies
 
scishgirl
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Aug, 2006 05:14 pm
a little help please
can a person apply for scottish citizenship even though both of there parents were born and raised in canada but both have scottish linage through their fathers.?
0 Replies
 
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Mon 7 Aug, 2006 12:28 am
Re: a little help please
scishgirl wrote:
can a person apply for scottish citizenship even though both of there parents were born and raised in canada but both have scottish linage through their fathers.?


I really have no idea, but I don't see why not, or why it would not be granted. How about dual Scottish/Canadian citizenship? It would take some time, of course, but in general there is a depopulation worry north of the border and so I imagine they would welcome suitable applicants.
The Scottish Office will publish details, I'm sure.

Googling, I found this site

http://www.scotlandistheplace.com/stitp/sitp_displayHome.jsp?pContentID=63&p_applic=CCC&p_service=Content.show&
0 Replies
 
jt2000us2
 
  1  
Reply Sat 31 May, 2008 03:09 pm
right of Abode in U.K.
If my Father was born in Edinburgh,Scotland would I be eligble
to apply for citizenship on that basis
Tantrumfly
 
  1  
Reply Sun 9 Nov, 2008 05:06 am
@jt2000us2,
Yes You are British by decent. apply for a passpoer and include his birth certificate, your birth certificate and your parents marriage certificate.
0 Replies
 
jonboy7
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Dec, 2008 07:31 am
If i get a UK citizenship does that cover Ireland, Scotland, Wales and England in regards to working fulltime there?
 

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