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How did they shave?

 
 
Don1
 
Reply Thu 24 Mar, 2005 08:27 am
I just watched a documentary on ancient Egypt and all the male persons are depicted as being clean shaven apart from what we would call today a "goatee beard" which is a small beard on the tip of the chin only.

My question is this, 3500 years ago what did they shave with?
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Type: Discussion • Score: 1 • Views: 3,422 • Replies: 18
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smog
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 Mar, 2005 08:32 am
Fire?
0 Replies
 
Bella Dea
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 Mar, 2005 08:35 am
didn't they have knives then? Or spears or something? Perhaps they fashioned a straight razor.
0 Replies
 
shewolfnm
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 Mar, 2005 08:37 am
Flint .

they would chip pieces of flint until they were sharp like an axe, then grind it across thier face/legs where ever and it would remove the hair.
I saw this on discovery once, if I can find the article about it I will post it here.
0 Replies
 
shewolfnm
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 Mar, 2005 08:48 am
I found this on an advertisement for razors.
It is very simply stated, but it contains alot of facts..

Quote:
PREHISTORIC TIMES, B.C. -

The history of shaving takes us back into the STONE AGE, around 100,000 B.C. when Neanderthal man first started pulling hair from, painting, and tattooing his body. He also enjoyed filing down his teeth for some reason, too. Ancient cave paintings inspected today will indicate that early man discovered other ways to remove hair from his face; in the beginning, he simply plucked them out using two seashells as tweezers. In fact, tweezers have remained throughout history as the most popular grooming tool ever invented, used by both "civilized" men and women to painfully remove body and facial hair. It's too bad they didn't have Quik Shave Razors back then.

The earliest shaving razors discovered were flint blades made possibly as far back as 30,000 B.C. Flint could provide an extremely sharp edge for shaving; these were, of course, the first disposable shavers because flint becomes dull rather quickly. Not only did early man cut and/or shave off body hair with flint; he also seemed to enjoy carving unusual artistic designs into his skin. If he added natural dyes and colors to these cuts, he ended up with a tattoo. Other stone shaving tools found were made during the Neolithic Period, or Late Stone Age.

4000 - 3000 B.C. -

Women are removing body hair by making their own depilatory creams that contain bizarre combinations of scary ingredients, such as arsenic, quicklime and starch.

3000 B.C. -

Permanent shaving razors are developed, thanks to the invention of metalworking. Copper razors are found available now in both India and Egypt.

1500 - 1200 B.C. -

Some of the most elaborate razors of ancient times are produced during this period in Scandinavia. Excavated from the Danish Mound Graves, razors were found inside their own leather carrying cases with mythological scenes etched or embossed into their bronze blades; the handles were carved into horse head-shapes.

500 B.C. -

In GREECE, it is popular for men to crop hair very short and shave the face. ALEXANDER THE GREAT is pretty much the guy responsible for this trend because he is obsessed with shaving. He even shaves during wartime, and will not allow himself to be seen going into battle with a five o'clock shadow. Greeks back then considered it an aesthetic approach to personal hygiene, like the Middle Eastern cultures.

500 B.C. -

Around this time, ROMAN WOMEN remove hair with razors, pumice stones and make homemade depilatory creams made from medicinal drugs, such as bryonia. They also use tweezers to pluck their eyebrows. ROMAN MEN have a skilled live-in servant to shave them; otherwise they start their day with a trip to the tonsor, or barber, who will shave a face with an iron novacila, or Roman razor. This type of shaver corrodes quickly and becomes blunt; so most customers usually, or eventually, get cut. But don't worry- the tonsor can fix this by applying to the face a soothing plaster made from special perfumed ointment and spider webs soaked in oil and vinegar. Despite the dangers of going to the barbershop, Roman men continue to flock in daily because they are also great centers for gossip and news.
0 Replies
 
Don1
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 Mar, 2005 12:34 pm
smog wrote:
Fire?


Of course, why didn't I think of that, I feel so silly now, they used to put their faces in the fire each day to get rid of the whiskers, it's so simple when you know the answer isn't it?
0 Replies
 
Letty
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Mar, 2005 04:45 pm
The wolf woman had a good response, Don. I also found this site.

http://www.touregypt.net/featurestories/beards.htm

Shewolf, I recall that early American Indian men had no facial nor chest hair.
0 Replies
 
Don1
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Mar, 2005 02:27 pm
shewolfnm wrote:
Flint .

they would chip pieces of flint until they were sharp like an axe, then grind it across thier face/legs where ever and it would remove the hair.
I saw this on discovery once, if I can find the article about it I will post it here.


Flint has been shown to be the sharpest substance ever produced in mankinds history, apparently surgeons knives dont even come close.

But would you scrape your face with it everyday?
0 Replies
 
Noddy24
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Mar, 2005 02:48 pm
I'm not sure, but I think obsidan is sharper than flint, although it is trickier to grind to an edge.
0 Replies
 
J-B
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Mar, 2005 09:08 pm
Maybe they used some potent drugs.
0 Replies
 
J-B
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Mar, 2005 09:13 pm
My question:

Why did ancient people shave?

Answers I list:
1. Ice age was over, long hairs became nuisance.
2. Civilization developed. It led people to feel that a human with too many hairs are uncivilized.
0 Replies
 
Don1
 
  1  
Reply Sun 27 Mar, 2005 09:52 am
^JB^ wrote:
My question:

Why did ancient people shave?

Answers I list:
1. Ice age was over, long hairs became nuisance.
.


and so you took a sharpened piece of obsidian and scraped your face with it each day.

Why would you do that?
0 Replies
 
J-B
 
  1  
Reply Mon 28 Mar, 2005 03:42 am
If the temperature of the ground reached the degree at which scrambled eggs can be easily made...

I would do that.
0 Replies
 
Lady J
 
  1  
Reply Mon 28 Mar, 2005 03:55 am
Don1 wrote:
^JB^ wrote:
My question:

Why did ancient people shave?

Answers I list:
1. Ice age was over, long hairs became nuisance.
.


and so you took a sharpened piece of obsidian and scraped your face with it each day.

Why would you do that?


Aesthetics, Don. It was the price they paid took beautiful.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 28 Mar, 2005 06:37 am
Shaving the scalp was standard practice for adult males as well, partly because the wearing of wigs was a regular practice, but also because of the climate.

By 3000 BC, permanent shaving razors are already developed, thanks to the invention of metalworking. (Copper razors are known in both India and Egypt at that time.)


(The earliest found flint blades date as far back as 30,000 B.C.)
0 Replies
 
Don1
 
  1  
Reply Mon 28 Mar, 2005 11:08 am
Walter Hinteler wrote:


By 3000 BC, permanent shaving razors are already developed, thanks to the invention of metalworking. (Copper razors are known in both India and Egypt at that time.)


With 21st century technology shaving is still a******* pain and razor blades 5000 years ago were comfortable and acceptable and they were made of sharpened copper???

Presumably these were made by the famous Sheffield firm of Mohammed Gillette Ltd.
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Mon 28 Mar, 2005 11:12 am
I recently attended a flint knapping demonstration. Those flakes are definately sharp enough to shave with, but I'm not at all sure of the comfort factor with the resulting wavy, fluted edge.
0 Replies
 
shewolfnm
 
  1  
Reply Mon 28 Mar, 2005 11:14 am
Letty wrote:
Shewolf, I recall that early American Indian men had no facial nor chest hair.


They still dont have alot of facial hair.
mostly around the top lip , and maybe... what we would refer to as ' peach fuzz' around thier chin.
Of course, this isnt obvious anymore because most native americans today are not full blood. Very rarely will you find a full blooded indian anymore. But if you do, you will notice this.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 28 Mar, 2005 11:15 am
The four blade flint version was invented by a Viking, Wilkin Wilkinson, and works much better.
0 Replies
 
 

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