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New candidate for 'missing element' in Earth's core

 
 
Reply Tue 10 Jan, 2017 02:42 am
From the BBC.

Quote:
Japanese scientists believe they have established the identity of a "missing element" within the Earth's core.

They have been searching for the element for decades, believing it makes up a significant proportion of our planet's centre, after iron and nickel.

Now by recreating the high temperatures and pressures found in the deep interior, experiments suggest the most likely candidate is silicon.

The discovery could help us to better understand how our world formed.

Lead researcher Eiji Ohtani from the University of Tohoku told BBC News: "We believe that silicon is a major element - about 5% [of the Earth's inner core] by weight could be silicon dissolved into the iron-nickel alloys."


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-38561076
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Type: Discussion • Score: 4 • Views: 331 • Replies: 8
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farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Jan, 2017 01:03 pm
@izzythepush,
wow, how much mony did this "discovery" cost them.
Weve known about Umafics and deep mantle serpentinites (hqving about 2-6% Si) and kimberlite pyrope garnets and gems like moissanite for years. We know where from from whence they came and their P/T relationships in solid solutions (The deeper the more ultra alkalis, the higher the amphoteric metals and the lower the Si).

Ill bet they spent a lotta money on beer
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Tue 10 Jan, 2017 01:54 pm
Pudding. Tapioca, I think, alternative studies suggest.
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Jan, 2017 04:24 pm
@farmerman,
You sound a bit jealous. Your beer budget not so good?
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Jan, 2017 05:50 pm
@izzythepush,
Remember the Monty Python skit in which Ann Elk had a "new theory" of the Brontosaurus? "The brontosaurus is long qnd thin t one end, large and fat in the middle end is long and thin at the other end".

This "hunt for silicon in the deep core" is like looking for mustard on a New Yawk hot dog
Blickers
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Jan, 2017 10:52 pm
@farmerman,
Quote farmerman:
Quote:
wow, how much mony did this "discovery" cost them.

For some reason, scientists tend to this a lot. I remember there was a big splash about 20 years ago when an Incan or Mayan city was discovered in the forest, all overgrown, of course. Then someone discovered an old vacation guidebook the province put out in the 1950s-and the "lost Incan city" was mentioned as a place for the tourists to visit.

It was a major excavation and the "discovery" occurred right before the excavation started, so it was a worthwhile thing to bring up. Who says a little PR can't be good for science?
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Wed 11 Jan, 2017 01:36 am
@farmerman,
Interesting analogy, because I can think of lots of names for the yellow stuff they put on US hot dogs, but mustard ain't one. It's not even hot.

I think this find is a bit more significant than you're letting on, otherwise they wouldn't be presenting it to the American Geophysical Union. Maybe they were just confirming something you suspected all along, but it still needed confirming.
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Wed 11 Jan, 2017 06:41 am
@izzythepush,
Lots of science is intuitively known but has never really been exhaustively studied. I hqvent read the paper but Id bet that this is the result of some geophysical model (rather than direct geochemical evidence) .
In the last few years, reflection seismology has been advanced so much that the "relative bulk chem" of various deep mantle fluids can be ascertained from using seismic tools.
Either that or weve developed new drilling techniques that allow us to get to the core.(I sorta doubt that)

As far as hot dogs and mustard, you understand that was a foody metaphor . You seem to immediately bristle at just about anything tht draws comparisons in food .
Youll not find me being expressively insulting at your country"s cuisine, no sir, not me. Even though UK "bacon" is comparable only to salted wooden pallets, and your entire country has never learned how to make a proper breakfast EGG!.
Dont even get me going on English "toast"
Nope, youll never see me making cheap shots at what passes for food in the UK. Qs long as the people arent starving, you can eat whatever you wish and make believe its delicious.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Wed 11 Jan, 2017 08:31 am
@farmerman,
I can't tell you how relieved I am to hear that.
0 Replies
 
 

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