5
   

Want Dietary Collagen-How About Home Pulverized Chicken Bones?

 
 
Reply Tue 3 Jan, 2017 02:40 pm
I took Knox Gelatin for a few days, but decided I didn't want a beef product which I don't eat and I'm also worried about threat of BSE, (Mad Cow Disease). Even though I don't want to use commercial gelatin, it seemed that my joints did feel pretty good for the few days I was using it. The only meat I usually eat is frozen wild caught salmon fillets and organic chicken legs, (Coleman brand, at ShopRite for an affordable $1.99/lb). Most organic chicken is unbelievably expensive, apparently these are an exception. I prefer the legs to any other part anyway.

All these cooks go into rhapsodies about "bone broth", which contains collagen but requires cooking the bones about two days on the stove. No thank you. So I am considering saving up my chicken legs after eating, putting them in the fridge, and after a few days taking them out and boiling/simmering them for a couple of hours. I plan to save the broth to be consumed individually, but the take the now boiled bones, dry them and put them in a food processor so they get reduced to powder, and then consuming the powder in water or as an additive to stew. Or maybe even by spoonful, but probably not as it seems unappetizing.

Is there any health reason this is not a good idea? Are pulverized/powderized organic chicken bones bad to eat for some reason? Believe it or not, the pits of some consumer fruits are poisonous, I'm wondering if chicken bones can be a bad idea to eat as well.
 
ossobucotemp
 
  2  
Reply Tue 3 Jan, 2017 03:38 pm
@Blickers,
Interesting question..
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  3  
Reply Tue 3 Jan, 2017 03:46 pm
@Blickers,
I've no idea, but for what it's worth, dogs can digest any kind of bones, though chicken bones are a danger because of the way they splinter. Just as a caution, a dog's digestive system is about as tolerant as a buzzard's.
Blickers
 
  1  
Reply Tue 3 Jan, 2017 07:24 pm
@roger,
LOL, never thought of dogs and how they love their bones. I figure between dogs eating bones and the fact that gelatine is crushed up bones and hooves and such, I'm about 90% sure boiling, pulverizing and eating these chicken leg bones is okay. It's that nagging 10% I'm worried about. I don't want to find out it wasn't a good idea in the emergency room.
roger
 
  2  
Reply Tue 3 Jan, 2017 07:28 pm
@Blickers,
I will worry if I don't see you around.
Blickers
 
  3  
Reply Tue 3 Jan, 2017 07:45 pm
@roger,
Be a hell of a thing if I find out after I do it that bones are an important component in making cement, or something.
0 Replies
 
ossobucotemp
 
  1  
Reply Tue 3 Jan, 2017 07:50 pm
@Blickers,
Your doc might know.. if it's a collagen disease type doc (not my business).
An ordinary doc might know too, dunno. I used to work in a rheumatology/hematology/immunology lab. Little late to call my old boss from years ago, but I'm curious re the answer.
0 Replies
 
chai2
 
  4  
Reply Tue 3 Jan, 2017 08:55 pm
Bones from chickens are lighter and smaller and only have to cook 24 hours, not 48.

You could just use a crockpot for that. It doesn't have to be on the stove.

It takes so long to make because all the collagen and minerals have to leach out of the bones. Consuming ground up bones won't get to all those nutrients, and will just pass through your body. I suppose you could do it, but you'd just be short changing yourself.

In addition, you won't be getting the full benefit just using the legs. You also want to use the necks, wings, and if can get them, feet.

Seems like a lot of hassel, a hell of a mess, for some sub-standard broth.

You can buy a container of bone broth protein in various flavors, or none, and make it as you want it. I guess you can get it for around 50 cents a serving, and sure beats having to make it.
ehBeth
 
  2  
Reply Tue 3 Jan, 2017 09:18 pm
@Blickers,
Blickers wrote:
So I am considering saving up my chicken legs after eating, putting them in the fridge, and after a few days taking them out and boiling/simmering them for a couple of hours.


that sounds like a fast track to botulism or something similar

__

If you're not going to boil or roast them them immediately, put them in the freezer.

Then roast them - and then boil the crap out of them. Simmering them isn't going to be useful, especially if it's just for a couple of hours.


You can make quite a good gelee from poultry - which is , yeah, pretty much gelatin. It's like the gelee you find on good pates. Don't scrape the clear stuff off the chicken liver pate - that's the expensive and healthy part. Chicken feet are the best part of the chicken for making gelee.
ehBeth
 
  2  
Reply Tue 3 Jan, 2017 09:19 pm
@chai2,
chai2 wrote:
Consuming ground up bones won't get to all those nutrients, and will just pass through your body.


yup

they're on the fast track out
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  2  
Reply Tue 3 Jan, 2017 09:23 pm
http://realfoodforager.com/recipe-chicken-feet-broth/

and the same info presented differently

http://www.thehealthyhomeeconomist.com/the-wonders-of-gelatin-and-how-to-get-more-in-your-stock/
ossobucotemp
 
  1  
Reply Tue 3 Jan, 2017 09:33 pm
@ehBeth,
Wow on that one..
0 Replies
 
Blickers
 
  1  
Reply Wed 4 Jan, 2017 12:32 am
@chai2,
Excellent information. I actually had been following Dr. Axe on YouTube, but I didn't know about this. This is definitely an option. Thank you.
0 Replies
 
Blickers
 
  1  
Reply Wed 4 Jan, 2017 12:35 am
@ehBeth,
Much thanks for the warning about putting the chicken legs in the freezer, not the fridge. I threw the refrigerated ones out right after you mentioned that. The links are very informative, and have given me a lot of info. All of this is very appreciated.

Lately a brainstorm has hit. I remember when I used the pressure cooker awhile back, when I cooked chicken the bones tended to be very soft. I've still got that pressure cooker, maybe I can get things gelling in less time with that. I will research.
roger
 
  2  
Reply Wed 4 Jan, 2017 01:02 am
@Blickers,
Gelling - I love it.
0 Replies
 
glitterbag
 
  3  
Reply Wed 4 Jan, 2017 01:38 pm
@Blickers,
The pressure cooker sounds like a good idea. While you research the details, just remember that the cooker releases steam so you will need to replenish the fluids more than once. I didn't research the fine points, but I have used pressure cookers and know they are terrific for getting to the essence and producing rich broth. Good luck
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  3  
Reply Wed 4 Jan, 2017 01:42 pm
@Blickers,
A lot of paleo diet folks make their stock using pressure cookers. I've heard the modern ones are much easier to use than the ones I recall.

I was as afraid of the pressure cooker as I was of the floor polisher (a lot) when I was a weeBeth.
ossobucotemp
 
  2  
Reply Wed 4 Jan, 2017 03:26 pm
@ehBeth,
I'm learning lots in this thread, thanks to all.
0 Replies
 
ossobucotemp
 
  2  
Reply Wed 4 Jan, 2017 03:36 pm
@ehBeth,
Ms. Clumsy is still afraid of pressure cookers (I remember my aunt having one of the oldie ones.) As a lab tech (head tech to boot), I was oddly skittish about new equipment until I used it once... a nervous fraidy cat in a lab coat.
0 Replies
 
chai2
 
  2  
Reply Wed 4 Jan, 2017 06:53 pm
@ehBeth,
ehBeth wrote:


I was as afraid of the pressure cooker as I was of the floor polisher (a lot) when I was a weeBeth.


I was afraid of the train because the witch and her gorilla came on it. I couldn't eat potato salad for years because of them.
0 Replies
 
 

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