Razmysl
 
Reply Mon 24 Oct, 2016 11:37 am
Won't someone explain to me, please, what an expression "a formal introduction" is concerning in this clip?

(source: Buck privates, a movie)
A peculiarity lies in the fact that Mr. Parker and Miss Gray have had an evanescent meeting earlier in which Randolph, being wrong, had offended the girl. But they were not properly acquainted at that time. Probably, he feels guilty now and wants to use a formal introduction as a chance to redress a wrong.
I, though I am not sure, see 2 introductions in the clip, namely, first, Miss Durling intoduces the young people to each other and, then, Miss Gray intoduces a recreation hall etc to Mr. Parker.
My questions:
1. Can a Mr. Parker's being acquainted with the recreation hall be named "a formal introduction"?
2. What a formal introduction did Mr. Parker try for: of Miss Gray, of the recreation hall or both?

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chai2
 
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Reply Mon 24 Oct, 2016 11:50 am
@Razmysl,
The only one who used the phrase "formal introduction" was the unseen officer. She simply meant it as "show him around" Not exactly joking, but no one needs to be formally introduced to a recreation hall. She was using the term lightly. Same for introducing him. She meant just show him around, introduce him to a few of his peers.

The whole point of the scene is that Parker is trying to get closer to Gray, an attractive female, and she's not interested at this point, as she's still upset with him.

They'll probably be married at the end of the film.

This whole film is a lighthearted comedy. Don't make too much of it.

Razmysl
 
  1  
Reply Tue 25 Oct, 2016 09:44 am
@chai2,
Thank you, chai2, for your detailed answer.
Bye!
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