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Are we less heavy at the equator?

 
 
Reply Wed 22 Jun, 2016 09:10 am
Are we less heavy when standing at the equator than at other points on the Earth, especially the poles? I mean because of the centrifugal force generated by the Earth's rotation. If so, by how much? How would one go about calculating this?
 
View best answer, chosen by TomTomBinks
parados
 
  2  
Reply Wed 22 Jun, 2016 09:17 am
@TomTomBinks,
I haven't looked it up but as I recall the earth actually bulges at the equator due to centrifugal force which would mean there is more mass attracting you there than at the poles.
DrewDad
 
  2  
Reply Wed 22 Jun, 2016 09:46 am
@parados,
Actually, that bulge will decrease your weight (by an insignificant amount). You are slightly further from the Earth's center of gravity, which reduces force.

Also, you experience centripetal force (I won't get into an argument about whether it's and actual "force." It's inertia counteracting some of the downward force exerted by gravity, anyway.)

So yes, a very accurate scale would measure you slightly differently at the pole vs the equator.

There are places in the Earth's crust where massive, dense objects are relatively close to the surface; these spots affect satellites and such.
TomTomBinks
 
  0  
Reply Thu 23 Jun, 2016 09:47 pm
@DrewDad,
Indulge me for a moment. If the Earth was uniformly dense throughout and perfectly spherical, then we would be less heavy at the equator than at the poles? Do you have any idea how to go about calculating this? ....anyone ...anyone?
DrewDad
  Selected Answer
 
  2  
Reply Fri 24 Jun, 2016 06:38 am
@TomTomBinks,
http://www.batesville.k12.in.us/physics/phynet/mechanics/circular%20motion/centforce_and_earth.htm

Calculation for a 60 Kg mass/person:
Quote:
So, your bathroom scale reads about 2 N less (about 0.3% or 1.5 oz) because of the rotation of the Earth.
TomTomBinks
 
  1  
Reply Fri 24 Jun, 2016 08:21 am
@DrewDad,
Thank You.
0 Replies
 
Brandon9000
 
  1  
Reply Sat 25 Jun, 2016 11:57 pm
Yes, the Earth's rotation makes an object weigh slightly less at or near the equator.
0 Replies
 
mark noble
 
  -1  
Reply Sun 26 Jun, 2016 06:08 am
@TomTomBinks,
No.
Take your scales to equador, stand on them/it, and you'll weigh the same.
0 Replies
 
Brandon9000
 
  0  
Reply Sun 26 Jun, 2016 10:11 am
You will weigh less by the amount mv^2/r where m is your mass, v is your speed caused by the rotation of the Earth, and r is the distance to the center of the Earth.
Leadfoot
 
  1  
Reply Sun 26 Jun, 2016 11:13 am
I'd say you weigh the same and have the same mass but the centripital force of rotation is counteracting some of your weight on the scale. The difference caused by distance from center of earth's mass is not a big enough factor to measure without very elaborate measuring methods.
mark noble
 
  -1  
Reply Mon 27 Jun, 2016 09:21 am
@Brandon9000,
Wrong again.
Weight is relative only from the perspective it is observed from.
mark noble
 
  -1  
Reply Mon 27 Jun, 2016 09:26 am
@Leadfoot,
Almost, Lead...

Did (Imaginary moon-lander) Neil Armstrong (LIAR) weigh any more/less when on (the moon)?
Nope.
He was still a liar of same weight.

The forces attracting him were different - His weight remained the same.
Leadfoot
 
  2  
Reply Mon 27 Jun, 2016 09:32 am
From the NASA website.
Quote:
The effective acceleration of gravity at the poles is 980.665 cm/sec/sec while at the equator it is 3.39 cm/sec/sec less due to the centrifugal force. If you weighed 100 pounds at the north pole on a spring scale, at the equator you would weigh 99.65 pounds, or 5.5 ounces less.
Leadfoot
 
  2  
Reply Mon 27 Jun, 2016 09:33 am
@mark noble,
Almost Mark.

His MASS remained the same.

Weight = Mass X local gravity + or - any other factor (like centrifugal force)
mark noble
 
  -1  
Reply Mon 27 Jun, 2016 09:42 am
@Leadfoot,
Gravity doesn't exist.
0 Replies
 
mark noble
 
  0  
Reply Mon 27 Jun, 2016 09:43 am
@Leadfoot,
Weight has nothing to do with mass.
Leadfoot
 
  1  
Reply Mon 27 Jun, 2016 11:46 am
@mark noble,
What IS weight relative to then?
mark noble
 
  -1  
Reply Mon 27 Jun, 2016 11:49 am
@Leadfoot,
Force upon/against (Electro-magnetic)
what weight is a tin can - When (Gravity 'false force') can be undone (Whole Earth's) by a tiny magnet pulling against it?
DrewDad
 
  4  
Reply Mon 27 Jun, 2016 11:51 am
@mark noble,
Gungasnake, is that you?
0 Replies
 
Brandon9000
 
  1  
Reply Mon 27 Jun, 2016 05:14 pm
@mark noble,
Your statement is very vague. Please give an example of what you mean. What do you mean when you say it is relative and what do you mean when you talk about the perspective it is observed from?
 

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