Reply Sat 4 Jan, 2003 05:08 pm
Can anyone recommend a species of trees not particularly bothered by salt water?

We're having trouble, we planted some trees in our yard but the mighty Atlantic via Boston Harbor keeps paying us visits. Not sure that snow and rain will be able to flush them out naturally despite all our efforts -- I don't think the Japanese Maples that are there now are going to make it. Still we would like some trees for shade. Any suggestions would be appreciated!

These (maple) trees are in a small area, a few feet from the seawall. We took down an old above ground pool, and my mother decided to use the broken asphalt to her advantage. My dad is bricking in the rest of the area. The idea was to bring shade to this part of the yard, we have trees bordering to the side, along the fence to our neighbors yard. Ironically before the pool, we had a large tree in that area, some type of eucalyptus that I loved as a kid and was sad when it was cut down for the pool. My parents hated it though because it had sticky leaves and seed pods.
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Type: Discussion • Score: 2 • Views: 10,533 • Replies: 21
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roger
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Jan, 2003 05:20 pm
Salt Cedar, also called tamarisk(sp?)

Salt cedar and salt bush do so well with salt they can be used to remove salt from the soil. I do not know how well they do in areas other than north western New Mexico.
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roger
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Jan, 2003 05:22 pm
Oh, there is also a commerical preparation called Ironite which might help the soil in your situation, but I believe that would come under the heading of Fighting Nature.
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Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Jan, 2003 05:31 pm
Madrona is a rather common tree in the Puget Sound, much less common elsewhere. It is known as Madrone in California, but I think that might be a slightly different variety. While it is considered a messy tree, that is because it has such a range of greenish white flowers, red berries, orange papery bark and deeply colored evergreen leaves, all of which must eventually drop to the ground.

As to your question, there are madronas growing directly on salt water sandspits and it is said, they won't grow unless within smelling distance of saltwater.

A very nice, moderately fast growing shade tree. Also nice for climbing and when dead, provides dense firewood, too.

In Scotland I was visiting one of the National Trust Castle (Crathes) and saw a small madrona getting pride of place in one of the lovely gardens. Quite nice to see an old friend from home.

I don't know how well madrona would withstand the freezing temps of Boston.

PS - If you are seriously concerned about your Japanese Maples and they represent a goodly investment, you might want to dig them up and move them quickly to higher ground, or even into the garage for the winter. It is a shame to lose them.
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edithdoll
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Jan, 2003 07:40 pm
Hi both suggestions sound interesting and I will research them further.

Piffka -- The Japanese maples were bought at Home Depot for $18 each, because my mother badgered the manager for the price, for all the trees were unmarked and going to be thrown away.
I think it's too late to move them to another part of the yard, although I can suggest it...
We might have to abandon having this small rock garden near the seawall, although again, the idea was to provide some shade in that part of the yard.
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littlek
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Jan, 2003 08:37 pm
skyline, common and sunburst honeylocusts are all salt tolerent (and these types are thornless).

Juniperus horizontalis 'Bar Harbor' - juniper
Pinus thunbergii - japanese black pine

An interesting site from Colorado of all places (I guess there's salt in their soil from way back when they were an inland ocean?)
[URL=High Tolerance - up to 8 mmhos(mS)]salt tolerant trees (and plants)[/URL]

what are you looking for? Shade providers, screens, aesthetic qualities....?
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littlek
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Jan, 2003 08:38 pm
skyline, common and sunburst honeylocusts are all salt tolerent (and these types are thornless).

Juniperus horizontalis 'Bar Harbor' - juniper
Pinus thunbergii - japanese black pine

An interesting site from Colorado of all places (I guess there's salt in their soil from way back when they were an inland ocean?)


what are you looking for? Shade providers, screens, aesthetic qualities....?salt tolerant trees and plants
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littlek
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Jan, 2003 08:38 pm
whoops... man I messed that up.
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Rae
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Jan, 2003 08:42 pm
edithdoll ~ Chinese Maples grow very well here in FL. Oleander, too. (Not sure about the Oleander in northern cold, but the Maple would thrive.)
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littlek
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Jan, 2003 08:43 pm
We definately can't swing oleander here... so sad.
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Rae
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Jan, 2003 08:54 pm
That is sad.....beautiful trees.....they practically line every street in Cocoa Beach.
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littlek
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Jan, 2003 09:02 pm
Here's an interesting tree:
seven sons tree
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Rae
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Jan, 2003 09:08 pm
Hmmmm.....very pretty.
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littlek
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Jan, 2003 09:12 pm
Interesting for sure.
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edithdoll
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Jan, 2003 12:46 pm
Hmm, great suggestions.
Thanks!
0 Replies
 
jeanbean
 
  1  
Reply Sun 12 Jan, 2003 05:11 pm
GARDENING
The Beach Plum grows on the sand, along with
Rosa Rugusa,which come in all different sizes and colors.
Even though I've left the beach, I'm going to plant some Rosa Rugosa
this year.
Both are very cold-hardy and both grow in sand, with salt-spray.
As far as I know, it's the only tree.
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littlek
 
  1  
Reply Sun 12 Jan, 2003 05:53 pm
I love both of those plants too jeanbean - they're amazing.

But neither are trees.
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jeanbean
 
  1  
Reply Sun 12 Jan, 2003 06:04 pm
GARDENING
I knew that the rugusas were not,
but I surprised at the Plum Tree.
It sure looks like a tree or is just a big shrub?
Can you give me a link?
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littlek
 
  1  
Reply Sun 12 Jan, 2003 06:53 pm
Hmmmm, now I'm doubting my own recollection.... I'll try to find a link.

Beach Plum

Looks like a shrub that can be pruned up into a small tree form.
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Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Sun 12 Jan, 2003 07:30 pm
Picea sitchensis (Sitka Spruce)
A fast-growing, giant evergreen, reaching 250'; and 6' in diameter, the Sitka spruce favors both freshwater and saltwater wetland areas where it often dominates. It is found in a limited range along the Pacific coast from central Alaska to northern California and is very common in southern Alaska and northern British Columbia. It has found great popularity in Britain, where it has been introduced.

Pinus ponderosa (Ponderosa Pine, Yellow Pine)
A magnificent, three-needle yellow pine, the Ponderosa pine grows rapidly, reaching 200'; with widths of 30'; The deep green needles are 6"- 10"; Large, brown bristly cones grow to 4"; often in pairs, and persist on the tree for a long time. Found in USDA zones 5 - 10, this tree grows from British Columbia to southern California, east to North Dakota and southeast to Texas. Ponderosa pine likes plenty of room and deep, light, porous soil as it develops a long taproot. These trees are highly drought-resistant and can grow in full sun, where they exude a glorious vanilla scent! They are excellent specimens for coastal planting, being very tolerant of salt spray.

Pinus contorta, var. contorta (Shore Pine)
This fast growing, two-needle yellow pine is closely related to Lodgepole pine. Native to the west coast, including the San Juan Islands and the Oregon coast, Shore pine is hardy in USDA zones 5 -10. Being highly tolerant of poor soils and saline conditions, it occurs in the wild on sandy bluffs along the seashore and also in peat bogs at higher elevations, where it becomes a natural bonsai. The short, dark green needles are 1-2½" long and curve slightly while the cones are ¾ - 2"; Usually a small tree, it can reach heights of 50' with intricate branching forms. It is fantastic in a small garden or as a hedge. A quick way to establish a native garden framework from bare ground is to plant a variety of small to large Shore pines.

Salix hookeriana (Hooker's Willow)
A stout, stiffly branched shrub or small tree, to 20 ft, 4" showy catkins. Good near salt water. In Spring, large catkins burst into halo of yellow anthers.
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