11
   

my puppy bit me. now what?

 
 
roger
 
  2  
Reply Sat 6 Jul, 2013 08:24 am
@Thomas,
We cross posted. I am in even greater disagreement on the rabies treatment than the immunization. Glad to hear it isn't the ordeal it used to be.
0 Replies
 
Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Sat 6 Jul, 2013 08:31 am
@roger,
I'm prepared to ease up on the rabies shot. Wikipedia informs me that it remains effective even after a human has caught the infection, and has noticed the onset of the illness. It was news to me that your shot can work this far into the infection.

I stand by my point on the tetanus shot, though.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Sat 6 Jul, 2013 08:46 am
@Thomas,
I still consider tetanus shots to be basic, and not because someone owns a pet.
Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Sat 6 Jul, 2013 09:01 am
@roger,
Good for you! Smile
0 Replies
 
firefly
 
  3  
Reply Sat 6 Jul, 2013 09:16 am
@Thomas,
Quote:
The 14-week-old puppy part is irrelevant. There will be future bites.

You are suggesting that all bites one gets from one's own puppy or dog could potentially carry rabies and transmit it to the owner, and that's just not true.

Your own pet is only going to acquire rabies by being in contact with and being bitten by a rabid wild animal. In which case your puppy or dog will show evidence of at least having been bitten, even before symptoms of rabies appear.

Most dog owners get bitten at least once during the course of their pet's life,
and where there is no reason, at all, to suspect your pet has contracted rabies, it is an unnecessary expense, and an unnecessary risk of exposure to the adverse effects of the vaccine, for owners to rush to get rabies vaccinations for themselves. The risk of an adverse reaction is probably higher than the risk of contracting rabies if you have no reason to believe your pet has been bitten by rabid wildlife, or has contracted rabies in some other way.

Your thinking does not reflect the thinking of the CDC--which does not recommend routine rabies vaccinations for all dog and cat owners. Furthermore, the dosing and scheduling of the shots differ if they are pre-exposure and after being bitten by a rabid animal, and continuing booster shots are needed to maintain immunity--the initial shots do not confer continuing immunity.


Quote:
Who should get rabies vaccine and when?

Preventive vaccination (no exposure)

•People at high risk of exposure to rabies, such as veterinarians, animal handlers, rabies laboratory workers, spelunkers, and rabies biologics production workers should be offered rabies vaccine.
• The vaccine should also be considered for: ◦People whose activities bring them into frequent contact with rabies virus or with possibly rabid animals.
◦International travelers who are likely to come in contact with animals in parts of the world where rabies is common.


The pre-exposure schedule for rabies vaccination is 3 doses, given at the following times:
•Dose 1: As appropriate
•Dose 2: 7 days after Dose 1
•Dose 3: 21 days or 28 days after Dose 1

For laboratory workers and others who may be repeatedly exposed to rabies virus, periodic testing for immunity is recommended, and booster doses should be given as needed. (Testing or booster doses are not recommended for travelers.) Ask your doctor for details.

Vaccination after an exposure

Anyone who has been bitten by an animal, or who otherwise may have been exposed to rabies, should clean the wound and see a doctor immediately. The doctor will determine if they need to be vaccinated.

A person who is exposed and has never been vaccinated against rabies should get 4 doses of rabies vaccine - one dose right away, and additional doses on the 3rd, 7th, and 14th days. They should also get another shot called Rabies Immune Globulin at the same time as the first dose.

A person who has been previously vaccinated should get 2 doses of rabies vaccine - one right away and another on the 3rd day. Rabies Immune Globulin is not needed.

What are the risks from rabies vaccine?

A vaccine, like any medicine, is capable of causing serious problems, such as severe allergic reactions. The risk of a vaccine causing serious harm, or death, is extremely small. Serious problems from rabies vaccine are very rare.

Mild problems
•soreness, redness, swelling, or itching where the shot was given (30% - 74%)
• headache, nausea, abdominal pain, muscle aches, dizziness (5% - 40%)

Moderate problems
•hives, pain in the joints, fever (about 6% of booster doses)

Other nervous system disorders, such as Guillain Barré syndrome (GBS), have been reported after rabies vaccine, but this happens so rarely that it is not known whether they are related to the vaccine.

NOTE: Several brands of rabies vaccine are available in the United States, and reactions may vary between brands. Your provider can give you more information about a particular brand.
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/rabies.html#risks


I personally know of absolutely no pet owners who have rushed to get rabies shots, after being bitten by a young puppy, where there is no indication the pup has even been exposed to rabies. I would never consider getting rabies shots for myself in that situation. I had a relative who did develop Guillain Barré syndrome following a flu shot, and I have no desire to expose myself to any unnecessary vaccination risks.

And, if you think PinkLipstick's puppy has rabies, shouldn't you suggest she take her dog to the Vet, rather than keep this rabid dog in her home? If that puppy has contracted rabies, he's going to die since, at 14 weeks, he's not yet fully inoculated from rabies.


Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Sat 6 Jul, 2013 12:27 pm
@firefly,
Too late. I already changed my mind. Thanks for the lecture, though.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Sat 6 Jul, 2013 12:31 pm
@Thomas,
Ah, but now we discover she doesn't believe in flu shots, either.
Who to trust? Who to trust?
firefly
 
  1  
Reply Sat 6 Jul, 2013 12:55 pm
@roger,
Quote:
Ah, but now we discover she doesn't believe in flu shots, either.

I never said I don't believe in flu shots, roger. But all vaccinations carry some risks with them. You have to consider the risks vs the benefits.

I do get a flu shot annually because I am willing to take necessary risks with some vaccinations I consider it necessary to have.

My risk of getting the flu, and of possibly of dying from flu complications, at my age, is considerably higher than my risk of getting rabies from my dog who has never been in contact with a rabid animal. So, the rabies vaccination would simply expose me to needless risk of adverse reactions, without any real benefits to compensate for those risks.

I even worry about my puppy possibly having an adverse reaction to his rabies vaccination, which he is due to get later this month, but the law requires that I get it for him.

After I typed my last post, my puppy lunged at me in play, mouth open, and hit his tooth against my hand, breaking the skin, and drawing a little blood. I am not running for rabies shots. Laughing

I'm not going to clothe myself in full body armor either. Laughing You live with a normally energic puppy, you're probably going to get your skin broken several times over, when they aren't even biting, particularly while they still have their needle-like baby teeth. If you're that fearful of what your puppy or dog can do to you, simply by displaying normal puppy or doggie behavior, you shouldn't own one.

0 Replies
 
vonny
 
  1  
Reply Sat 6 Jul, 2013 12:59 pm
Being dozy (as usual) but where is the question? I've had this problem before - I can see the first post in reply to the question, but not the question itself. Embarrassed
0 Replies
 
Phoenix32890
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Jul, 2013 06:46 am
When I was a teenager, I had a Boston Terrier puppy. One day he bit me. I picked up his paw, looked him squarely in the eyes, and bit him. He never attempted to bite me again.
Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Jul, 2013 06:49 am
@Phoenix32890,
That reminds me of a girlfriend during the 70's, who bit me on the bottom.

I loved the 70's.
0 Replies
 
PinkLipstick
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Jul, 2013 07:04 am
I was taking it away because it wasn't his. The one he had in his mouth had garlic on it and I've read online that that is bad for them. His meals are made with no condiments. The reason he had this steak is because my nephew gave it to him.

And this is actually my first dog. He hasn't bitten me since then. We feed him at 7 am, 12 pm, and at 5 pm. Ever since the biting incident, I decided to attempt to give him puppy food again, with chicken as the first ingredient. He eats a little bit of it now when I hand feed him and I leave it out all day to encourage him to eat it.

The wound is healing too! I had never been bitten before, so I was really worried that I was dying or something! It looked purple and inflamed and bloody! turns out it was just a scratch.

We live in the city and he only ever goes to our enclosed, large backyard, so he's hardly ever in contact with other animals. He does like chasing birds and bugs, though.

We recently got him his rabies vaccine. His vet only wants to give him 2 vaccinations/week because he doesn't want to stress out his body too much.

All in all, everything's fine now. I think most of all, I felt hurt and thought he bit me because he didn't love me anymore or something. It was probably just because the steak was so yummy and he was very hungry.

Thanks to everyone who posted!
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Jul, 2013 07:13 am
@PinkLipstick,
Regardless of current lack of exposure to other dogs, be aware that your dog will (and should) come into contact with other dogs. Also you need to know that some illnesses are airborne. Any dog, even indoor dogs, can and will get fleas. So that should be a monthly treatment, meds (drops or tablets).

Please read up on how to raise puppies. Also it is a must for you to read some of the links provided. Clearly this information is not an intuitive thing. Your vet also can help teach you as many vet clinics offer classes in young dog training. Good luck.
PinkLipstick
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Jul, 2013 08:54 am
@Ragman,
Yes, when I first got my puppy, I took him to the vet and I told her he was my first puppy and she talked to me about a few things, including the fleas. We gave him front line plus right then and there and have been giving him a new dose every 4 weeks.

And of course, I still do have a lot to learn. However, different websites say different things and they contradict each other, so it's hard to figure out which method I'm supposed to follow for different things. I'll just follow the golden rule: "treat others the way you would want to be treated"
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Jul, 2013 09:10 am
@PinkLipstick,
At the risk of being repetitive or sounding like a scold, I feel that you're still not grasping the important task of dog training issues.

The golden rule of treat others the way you would want to be treated is more pertinent to a human family member or friend. I strongly suggest you either read a book or take training classes. Issue like learning how to be the alpha are essential as your dog may start to develop behavioral habits that may make life with the dog annoying or worse. Once you and your puppy both learn who is alpha only THEN can training can proceed.

Please consider this warning as a friendly advice. It took my raising 2 cats to age 19 and my current dog at age 8 for me to understand more about animal behavior. I was a slow learner.
0 Replies
 
firefly
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Jul, 2013 09:21 am
@PinkLipstick,
Quote:

And this is actually my first dog.

That's why you have got to start learning about puppies, how to care for them, what they need, and what you can expect in terms of their normal behavior as they go through the various developmental stages.

I'm glad you started him on puppy food again. You should try giving him canned wet puppy food, as well as the dry, since he might prefer one texture over the other, and teething might affect his preferences as well. It's important that he eats enough to support his rapid growth. If you have to hand feed him some, or most, of the time, that's fine, it will help you to bond with him, and help him to trust you around his food. Once he's reliably eating his puppy food, you can taper off on doing that.

Don't worry, PinkLipstick, a nip from your puppy doesn't mean he doesn't love you, it just means he is acting like a puppy. And, if he chews up your favorite shoes, that won't mean he doesn't love you either--it just means you have to keep your shoes out of his reach and supply him with plenty of safe chew toys of his own he can gnaw on. Your dog will love you, no matter what, because that is the wonderful unconditional love that dogs give us. Since he is your first dog, you have yet to discover that, but you will, and, as he grows, he will show you his love in more and more ways.

So, read up on puppy care, make sure he eats his puppy food, spend lots of time playing with him, and teaching him some basic commands, and just enjoy him. He's going to wind up being your bff.

0 Replies
 
firefly
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Jul, 2013 09:46 am
@PinkLipstick,
PinkLipstick, try starting with one of the Web sites for Beagle owners, like this one

http://www.beaglepro.com/Command_Training.html

They suggest you start with teaching your puppy to "fetch"--which is something you and your puppy can both enjoy doing while playing together. Then you can move on to "come" and "give". Just make sure you have lots of little treats in your pocket to reward him for good behavior and for following your verbal commands--the treat (a very small bite of anything he likes) must be given immediately, along with verbal praise, when he does what you are asking him to do. And always use his name before giving the command--it is the sound of his name that gets his attention to listen to the command. So, don't just say, "sit", say, "Snoopy, sit," using your dog's name first.

Rewards and praise are what will help him to learn. Your dog really does want to please you--you've just got to teach him how to do that, and praise and rewards for following your commands are the best way of doing that. As he learns, and grows, you can gradually eliminate the treats, and your verbal praise and petting will become his sufficient reward.

That Web site also has other suggestions for puppy care and training.

If you live near a Petco, they also have training classes especially for puppies and their owners, and, as soon as your puppy finishes getting his shots, he'll be ready to attend those with you. Petco also sells books on puppy and dog care you might find useful.

On the previous page, I also posted links to Beagle forums, where others discuss their dog's behavior and get their questions answered. You might check some of those out too.

Good luck.
0 Replies
 
 

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