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Cool Whip volume to weight conversion

 
 
Reply Sun 3 Feb, 2013 05:29 pm
How many ounces of Cool Whip are there in a 1 Litre container
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Type: Question • Score: 2 • Views: 4,945 • Replies: 29
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jespah
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2013 07:58 am
@Toobinator,
The same # of ounces of dog food, pencils or sponges - this is a simple conversion problem.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2013 08:26 am
Something which weighs one ounce does not necessarily occupy one ounce of volume. Of course, the reverse it true as well.
jespah
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2013 08:34 am
@Setanta,
Ah true - and there's a lotta air in Cool Whip.
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2013 08:47 am
@jespah,
But it's good air . . . very decadent, tasty air . . .
0 Replies
 
parados
 
  2  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2013 09:28 am
@Toobinator,
It looks like about 8oz in 2 cups.

2 cups = .47 litres

That means about 17 oz in a litre.
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2013 12:33 pm
@parados,
There are fractionally more than 33.8 ounces in a liter.
parados
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2013 12:40 pm
@Setanta,
Not of Cool Whip there ain't!!



On the flip side, cool whip left out won't take up less volume
http://www.jonathanfields.com/blog/horrifying-12-day-cool-whip-experiment/

Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2013 12:45 pm
@parados,
If you are speaking of ounces as a meaure of volume, there are 33.8+ ounces in a liter, no matter in what the liter consists. Are you perhaps confusing ounces as a measure of weight with ounces as a measure of volume?

Conversion of liter to ounces. Note that Imperial ounces are slightly smaller than U.S. Standard ounces, and there are a few more of them in a liter.

That's an apples to apples comparison of a measure of volume to a measure of volume.
parados
 
  2  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2013 12:52 pm
@Setanta,
Cool whip isn't a fluid.

It isn't a food stuff either.

There are about 17 ounces of Cool Whip in a cubic liter.
contrex
 
  2  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2013 01:36 pm
@parados,
parados wrote:
There are about 17 ounces of Cool Whip in a cubic liter.


Surely 'cubic' is redundant, since a litre is a measure of volume? (= one thousand cubic centimetres)


0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2013 01:54 pm
@parados,
You seem to be willfully obtuse. An ounce can be a measure of volume or a measure of weight. It doesn't matter if a substance is liquid, solid or even a gas, it can be measured for it's volume.

You've got a problem here, but it's not my problem. Bye . . .
parados
 
  2  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2013 02:02 pm
@Setanta,
A fluid ounce is a measure of volume.

I don't recall ever seeing solid ounces as a measure of volume. I also can't seem to find any reference to solid ounces being volume measures on the internet.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2013 02:18 pm
I really should know better . . . but, when you buy sand or gravel at a lumber yard or a home improvement store, they are sold by the cubic yard. Do you consider sand or gravel to be liquids?

So let's examine your foolishness since you began posting here:

Quote:
It looks like about 8oz in 2 cups.

2 cups = .47 litres

That means about 17 oz in a litre.


A cup is eight ounces, so it cannot be that eight ounces is two cups. Also, you write "about 17 oz in a litre," which seems to suggest that you're talking about measures of volume (a cup is a measure of volume, not of weight). There are 33.8+ ounces in a liter, not 17. If you meant weight rather than volume, tell me which weighs more, a liter of water or a liter of oil-based paint? In fact, a liter in the old metric system is defined as the volume occupied by one thousand grams of water.

Furthermore, the OP is asking for a volume to weight conversion. Therefore, you cannot use a cup for an approximation of that conversion, as a cup is a measure of volume, not of weight.

Come on, Parados, this ain't rocket science.
parados
 
  2  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2013 02:35 pm
@Setanta,
Since we are talking about Cool Whip...
(And I was replying to the original post)

http://www.addictedtosaving.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/free1.jpg

If you have ever bothered to go to a grocery store you would know that an 8 oz container of Cool Whip does NOT contain a cup of Cool Whip. It contains 2 cups.

The title reverses the weight to volume from the question asked in the original post.

Quote:
How many ounces of Cool Whip are there in a 1 Litre container


and my response

Quote:

about 17 oz in a litre.




I am curious how many ounces you think are in a cubic yard? I think you got fluid ounces on your mind and failed to understand I was converting volume to weight as the OP requested.
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2013 02:45 pm
@parados,
Fine, you finally showed your work. So, if you are talking about ounces of weight, it is inappropriate to say that seventeen ounces equals one liter. One liter of what? One liter of water (the basis for a liter in the metric system is the volume occupied by one thousand grams of water--one thousand grams equals fractionally more than 35 ounces) does not weigh the same as, for the example i used, one liter of oil-based paint.

You cannot compare a measure of weight to a measure of volume without specifying the material in that volume. But you were off and running saying that seventeen ounces equals one liter--i.e., that a specified measure of weight equals a measure of volume. Don't blame me for your confusion. Furthermore, as measures of volume, there are more than four cups in a liter, so your story is still bullshit.
parados
 
  2  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2013 02:46 pm
@Setanta,
I only blame you for your own confusion. Wink
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2013 02:48 pm
@parados,
I'm not the one who is confused here, Bubba. You're the one who thinks that two cups equals one liter. You really need to get out more.
parados
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2013 02:59 pm
@Setanta,
I only think 17 oz of Cool Whip equal one liter and that is the specific question I answered.
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2013 03:01 pm
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:
I really should know better . . . but, when you buy sand or gravel at a lumber yard or a home improvement store, they are sold by the cubic yard.


They are sold by the tonne (1000 kg) where I come from.
 

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