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Is this the beginning of the end of Rupert Murdoch's media empire?

 
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Tue 27 Mar, 2012 09:57 pm
@msolga,
If you're interested, here's the full (very long & very detailed) Australian Financial Review article which was published this morning.:

Pay TV piracy hits News
PUBLISHED: 14 hours 27 MINUTES AGO | UPDATE: 2 hours 17 MINUTES AGO :
http://www.afr.com./p/business/marketing_media/pay_tv_piracy_hits_news_OV8K5fhBeGawgosSzi52MM
0 Replies
 
hingehead
 
  1  
Reply Tue 27 Mar, 2012 10:15 pm
I'm thinking Rupert took US citizenship a little too seriously - talk about irony-challenged - this on twitter “Without trust, democracy, and order will go.”

http://www.pressgazette.co.uk/story.asp?sectioncode=1&storycode=49007&c=1


Code:Error: image of giant black pot screaming at kettle cannot be loaded

dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Wed 28 Mar, 2012 09:18 am
@hingehead,
Oh dearie, dearie me.
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Thu 29 Mar, 2012 12:32 am
@msolga,
Murdoch hits back.

But interestingly, neither Rupert Murdoch nor Chase Carey responded to the allegations made on the Panorama program in Britain, nor those in the Australian Financial Review, yesterday.

Their response seems more bluster than anything else.

Quote:
Rupert Murdoch slams 'lies and libels' of toffs and right-wingers
Kirsty Simpson
March 29, 2012 - 3:09PM/the AGE


http://images.theage.com.au/2012/03/29/3173141/AC-murdoch_20120329151851750895-420x0.jpg
Rupert Murdoch has hit out on Twitter after allegations involving pay TV piracy. Photo: Reuters

Rupert Murdoch has warned his enemies he is ready to ''have it on'' in his first statements following renewed media allegations around the activities of former News Corp company NDS.

Without referring directly to the allegations that NDS promoted piracy, Mr Murdoch today tweeted:

"Seems every competitor and enemy piling on with lies and libels. So bad, easy to hit back hard, which preparing."

http://images.theage.com.au/2012/03/29/3173016/Chase-Carey_20120329142741345058-420x0.jpg
Chase Carey, Chief Operating Officer of News Corporation. Photo: Phil McCarten

In a second tweet, he said: ''Enemies many different agendas, but worst old toffs and right wingers who still want last century's status quo with their monoplies.''

Then in a third, he added: ''Let's have it on, choice, freedom of thought and individual responsibility.''

Earlier, News Corp chief operating officer Chase Carey came out swinging after a week of media attention in Australia, the UK and the US over the pay TV piracy claims.

Mr Carey slammed a BBC program (Panorama) aired in the UK on Monday, which focused on the subject.

The show, not aired in Australia, was followed by lengthy reports in The Australian Financial Review, which also aired details from a cache of emails from within NDS relating to the allegations.

Mr Carey did not refer to Review's reports, although News Ltd yesterday vigorously attacked the claims.

"The BBC's Panorama program was a gross misrepresentation of NDS's role as a high quality and leading provider of technology and services to the pay-TV industry, as are many of the other press accounts that have piled on - if not exaggerated - the BBC's inaccurate claims,'' Mr Carey said in a statement released this afternoon Australian time.

''Panorama presented manipulated and mischaracterised emails to produce unfair and baseless accusations.

''News Corp is proud to have worked with NDS and to have supported them in their aggressive fight against piracy and copyright infringement.''

NDS, which was this month sold to technology giant Cisco for $5 billion, also rounded on the BBC program. News Corp released a letter from NDS chairman Abe Peled to Panorama, saying it: ''Seriously misconstrued legitimate activities we undertake in the course of running an encryption business.

''You have used footage to falsely demonstrate your allegation that we sent certain emails externally to facilitate piracy when in fact the email was sent internally as part of our anti-piracy work. You have also taken emails wholly out of context. This has helped paint a picture for your viewers that is incorrect, misleading and deeply damaging to my company and our sister company News Corporation.''

Mr Peled called for an immediate retraction of the allegations.


The company's shareprice had fallen 1.9 per cent today to $19.11 at 2pm, after two days of rises.

This afternoon, Prime Minister Julia Gillard backed Communications Minister Stephen Conroy's call for any criminal conduct to be referred to police. ....<cont>


http://www.theage.com.au/opinion/political-news/rupert-murdoch-slams-lies-and-libels-of-toffs-and-rightwingers-20120329-1w09r.html
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Thu 29 Mar, 2012 03:49 am
@msolga,
Basically Murdoch is accused of hacking their main rivals (satellite TV) code, and giving it to pirates so they went of business.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Thu 29 Mar, 2012 03:51 am
@izzythepush,
Panorama is a very serious programme, they don't make unfounded allegations.
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Thu 29 Mar, 2012 04:25 am
@izzythepush,
Yes, I know.
Same in Australia. (see my earlier post)
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Thu 29 Mar, 2012 04:27 am
@izzythepush,
Yes, so I understood.
Same with the Australian Financial Review, which published the information in Oz.
izzythepush
 
  2  
Reply Thu 29 Mar, 2012 06:03 am
@msolga,
Murdoch's outburt is encouraging. For a long time Murdoch and Cameron's Tories have been very cosy, even going so far as having David Coulson as Cameron's press secretary, and neighbourly hobnobbing with the Brookses.

Murdoch's Sunday Times printed a story where the Tory Treasurer John Cruddas was boasting that a £250,000 donation to the Tories would get you invited to a dinner party at No. 10 where you could tell Cameron to lower the top rate of tax.

This has all caused a bit of a shitstorm, as the top rate has just been lowered, tax relief for pensioners has been abolished, and the VAT exemption for freshly baked goods has been withdrawn. Basically hot food attracts VAT, cold food doesn't. Freshly baked pastries like sausage rolls and pasties did not attract VAT as they were allowed to cool down. This has all added to perception that the Tories are out of touch. Cameron then went on to obviously lie about how he really liked pasties, and said that he last bought one at Leeds Railway Station. The shop he described actually ceased trading in 2007.

Coupled to that, there's panic buying of petrol. There has been a vote by the tanker drivers to go on strike, but they're not on strike. They're still negotiating, and if they do go on strike they'll have to give a week's notice anyway. The LibDem transport minister, Ed Davey,advised people to top up and fill jerry cans up, ( something condemned by the AA and Fire Brigade), and the result is long queues at petrol stations. They'll be panic buying bread next.
0 Replies
 
Sturgis
 
  2  
Reply Thu 29 Mar, 2012 06:11 am
@msolga,
This week PBS has put up Murdoch on it's Frontline series.

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/murdochs-scandal/
Nothing particularly new, just another item examining the disaster known as Murdoch. It was moderately interesting.

(it's a full episode, so over 50 minutes)
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Thu 29 Mar, 2012 07:18 am
@Sturgis,
Thanks, Sturgis.
0 Replies
 
parados
 
  1  
Reply Thu 29 Mar, 2012 07:44 am
@Sturgis,
There's so much that has happened, Frontline barely was able to hit the highlights of the scandal.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Thu 29 Mar, 2012 08:05 am
@parados,
There is so much, here's a link to some of The Guardian's most recent reports.

Quote:
Rupert Murdoch's troubles over the ongoing phone hacking scandal have become the subject of a renewed flurry of media attention this week, with broadcasters and websites across the world releasing the results of months of investigative digging.

What's striking about this week's rash of material is its truly global nature. What began as a largely internal UK affair has now spread its tentacles across national US television, prompted forensic delving into a News Corp company with roots in Israel, and inspired probing questions about some of Murdoch's Australian holdings.

Here's a guide to what's being claimed – and the News Corp responses


http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2012/mar/28/news-corporation-nds-panorama-frontline?INTCMP=SRCH

Quote:
Rupert Murdoch has launched a fightback on Twitter against what he described as "lies and libels" against News Corporation, attacking "enemies" including "old toffs and rightwingers".

The media mogul tweeted three times in the early hours of Thursday morning London time attacking his critics.


http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2012/mar/29/rupert-murdoch-blasts-news-corp-critics?INTCMP=SRCH

Quote:
Rupert Murdoch's News Corporation has accused the BBC of "gross misrepresentation" over the Panorama documentary alleging that its former subsidiary NDS was involved in helping computer hackers to undermine ITV Digital.
Chase Carey, News Corp's chief operating officer and Murdoch's right-hand man, said in a statement issued early on Thursday that Monday's Panorama had "presented manipulated and mischaracterised emails to produce unfair and baseless accusations".


http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2012/mar/29/news-corp-bbc-pay-tv?INTCMP=SRCH

Quote:
Australian minister wants News Corp hacking claims investigated

Communications minister wants police to look into accusations News Corp software firm NDS engaged in 'dirty tricks'


http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2012/mar/28/australian-minister-news-corp?INTCMP=SRCH

I think the first link gives a more comprehensive overview.
izzythepush
 
  0  
Reply Thu 12 Apr, 2012 02:59 am
@izzythepush,
Legal action has begun in America.

Quote:
A British lawyer says he is taking legal action in the United States on behalf of three alleged victims of phone hacking by the News of the World.

Mark Lewis said the three were a "well-known sports person", a sports person not in the public eye and a US citizen.

"The News of the World had thousands of people they hacked. Some of them were in America at the time, either travelling or resident there," he said.

He said the now defunct paper's owner News International had not responded.


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-17686754
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 Apr, 2012 02:34 am
Another day, another address to an inquiry.

Extraordinary statement.
Perhaps he told them what they'd better deliver, or else?
And certainly not just in the UK, either. :

Quote:
News Corporation chairman Rupert Murdoch has tried to downplay his influence on British politics, telling a UK inquiry into press standards that he has "never asked a prime minister for anything".

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2012-04-25/murdoch-appears-before-leveson-inquiry/3972508

McTag
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 Apr, 2012 02:40 am
http://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Guardian/Pix/pictures/2012/4/25/1335390648877/Steve-Bell-26.04.2012-002.jpg

http://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Guardian/Pix/pictures/2012/4/25/1335312146394/Steve-Bell-25412-002.jpg

http://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Guardian/Pix/pixies/2012/4/27/1335482792637/Steve-Bell-27.04.12-009.jpg
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 Apr, 2012 02:41 am
@msolga,
He seems to have circled his wagons on his testimonies. I just dont find him very believable .
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 Apr, 2012 02:54 am
@msolga,
Murdoch may say that now, but the Sun itself told a very different story after Labour lost the 1992 election.

http://www.davidosler.com/sun%20wot%20won%20it.jpg

This is the front page that appeared on election day, and was enough to turn a slight Labour lead into a narrow Tory victory. This is why Blair was so keen to court Murdoch.

http://www.bl.uk/learning/images/front%20page/If%20Kinnick%20Wins-st.jpg
msolga
 
  2  
Reply Fri 27 Apr, 2012 03:19 am
@farmerman,
Quote:
I just dont find him very believable .

I don't believe a word he says.
But at least he isn't playing for sympathy this time.... by playing the wobbly, vague old codger, like last time.
Though he still appears to conveniently have forgotten quite a bit!
Cunning old fox!

As for Murdoch denying exercising power over politicians & political parties .... what can you say? Ridiculous.

He honed his wheeling & dealing skills in Oz, prior to heading off to the UK & the US & carrying on with more of the same there.

Murdoch has enjoyed "king maker" status for years now, undermining Particular (Oz ) governments & empowering others, purely for his own ends.
Politicians who don't play ball with him can get very nasty treatment from his newspapers ..... News Ltd has been running a relentless anti-Gillard/Labor government campaign before & since that government won office.

Quote:
It was Keating's 1986 media ownership changes which cleared the way for News Corp to develop its ridiculous 70 per cent Australian newspaper market share courtesy of its 1987 takeover of the Herald and Weekly Times.

The Murdoch press backed Keating at key moments in his subsequent war of attrition against Bob Hawke, yet Keating has never given a full account of his dealings with Murdoch, let alone admitted the HWT takeover was a disaster for Australia's democracy.

On Lateline last Thursday, the best Keating could do was call for tougher privacy laws and confirm the blindingly obvious that News Ltd was currently "at war with the Gillard Government".


The Murdoch media game-changer:
http://www.abc.net.au/unleashed/2798930.html

izzythepush
 
  0  
Reply Fri 27 Apr, 2012 03:43 am
@msolga,
The Guardian's sketch writer Nick Davies summed it up quite well.

Quote:
Rupert Murdoch: the life and times of a media mogul Link to this video
Rupert Murdoch is in trouble. In two days as a witness at the Leveson inquiry he has blocked and blasted, smeared and smiled, and, at the end of it, this most powerful of men still has his ankle caught in the snare of scandal. He is vulnerable.

This is a man who is used to getting his way. He is not used to being confronted by people who have the power, the skill and the simple effrontery to challenge him – and to keep on challenging him. On Wednesday morning, he walked in with all the protection that his advisers could give him in the previous days of detailed briefings and endless rehearsals. By Thursday morning, there were times when he had lost the script, lost the plot and he simply sat there, with nobody to help him and no way out.

Just after 11.30am, there was one riveting and typical exchange, in which he tried all the manoeuvres which would normally have allowed him to create some diversion to avoid answering a question. And all of them failed.

Robert Jay QC, for the inquiry, wanted to know how Murdoch had reacted to a letter from Max Mosley, whose involvement with prostitutes was exposed by the News of the World, pointing out that a high court judge had found that one of his reporters had engaged in blackmail to try to persuade a prostitute to tell what she knew about him. Was that acceptable behaviour?

Murdoch went first for a standard manoeuvre. Ignorance. He hadn't read the letter. "I was out of town or something." Jay pushed on, suggesting he must have been aware of the judge's comment. Murdoch tried a different manoeuvre. He turned tough. So what if his reporter had threatened to reveal the prostitute's identity if she didn't co-operate? "I'm not as shocked as he is by that." Then, without pausing, he threw in a smear, oddly aimed at the former lawyer for the Sunday Times, Alastair Brett: "I'm more shocked by the behaviour of Mr Brett in not telling the truth of a lot of things."


http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2012/apr/26/rupert-murdoch-reputation-leveson-verdict
0 Replies
 
 

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