Irishk
 
  1  
Reply Mon 15 Aug, 2011 01:40 pm
PPP/DailyKos poll has both Democrats winning by double digits tomorrow. MOE for both under 3%.
0 Replies
 
Irishk
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Aug, 2011 11:09 am
New from PPP today...

Sentiment moving against Walker recall

0 Replies
 
H2O MAN
 
  0  
Reply Tue 16 Aug, 2011 12:53 pm


Wisconsin Recall Elections: Democrat Sens. Bob Wirch and Jim Holperin


0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Wed 16 Nov, 2011 05:00 pm
Apparently some folks who were trying to stop the Walker recall collected a bunch of signatures with the intent of destroying the petitions or holding on to them and not turning them in. Supposedly there are "over 1000 people involved in the effort".

Quote:
The man, who collected 150 signatures on Nov. 15, said he plans to turn them into the Government Accountability Board. One other person is also going to turn his in and they are going to convince a third person to do the same.

"It’s not the right thing to do, we should have known better," the unnamed source said. "The whole thing wasn’t our idea. It’s something we just stumbled on and we did it, 24 hours later we realized that it’s not a good thing to do. I’ve been thinking about it and it’s just not right. But when I think about what’s been going on all year with the protests, and what this has been doing to people, families, and friends…is making normal people do really stupid things and feel stupid things. And it’s crazy. It's absolutely crazy."

However, he told Patch that he was told there were over 1,000 people involved with the effort.

Reid Magney, public information officer with the Government Accountability Board, said the man’s actions constitute fraud. More
0 Replies
 
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 Jan, 2012 08:25 am
@Cycloptichorn,
Gov. Scott Walker vs. unions: Wisconsin set to count recall petitions
Petitions calling for the recall of Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, who emerged last year as the national face of anti-union legislation, are due Tuesday. Signature-counting is set to begin this week.

Petitions calling for a recall of Republican Gov. Scott Walker are due Tuesday, and as Wisconsin gears up to count signatures, analysts say it’s near certain that the recall election – the final phase of a partisan struggle that began with a showdown over unions last February – will go forward.

•.Six Republicans are being targeted this round, but most of the focus has been on Governor Walker, who emerged last year as the national face of anti-union legislation and is considered the most vulnerable.

With the opposition saying they have more than enough signatures to trigger the recall election, it is no longer a matter of “if” the election will happen, but “when,” most observers say.

“Everyone anticipates it will happen,” says Barry Burden, a political scientist at the University of Wisconsin in Madison. “This does feel like a final judgment.”

Will Wisconsin recall clip Gov. Scott Walker's power? Three scenarios.

Wisconsin voters already sacked two Republican state senators in a recall election last summer, after a contentious spring when the Republican majority in the Legislature passed a bill that weakened public-sector unions in the state. In addition to Walker, the recall efforts this time target Lt. Gov. Rebecca Kleefisch and four Republican state senators.

If the recall election succeeds, Walker will be only the third governor in US history removed from office by a recall. The last was former California Gov. Gray Davis, a Democrat, in 2003.

Democrats say they have collected more than the 540,208 signatures required by state law to make the recall election happen. In a speech this month at the American Enterprise Institute, a conservative think tank in Washington, Walker said he is resigned to the reality of the election taking place midway through his first term.

He said the state’s union leadership wants his ouster only because, under the new rule, unions can no longer deduct dues automatically from paychecks of public-sector employees.

“What it really comes down to, I took away the gravy train, the free money they had before, and gave that right back to the workers to make that decision,” the governor said.

Last week, the Government Accountability Board, the state agency tasked with public elections, reported that the recall election would cost taxpayers $9 million, a figure that both sides are using to their advantage in their ongoing public relations campaign. Republicans are characterizing Democrats as wasteful in their mission to vilify Walker, while Democrats say the state money – a total sum spread across more than 2,000 municipalities – is worth the effort.

Gov. Scott Walker vs. unions: Wisconsin set to count recall petitions
Petitions calling for the recall of Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, who emerged last year as the national face of anti-union legislation, are due Tuesday. Signature-counting is set to begin this week.

(Mike Tate, chairman of the state’s Democratic Party, acknowledged in a recent statement that the $9 million price tag was “great,” but added “the cost of doing nothing is far greater. This undertaking is the biggest investment in the future of our state and families we can make.”

Who might be angling for Walker’s seat is not yet certain. The single candidate who has publicly expressed interest so far is state Sen. Tim Cullen, a longtime moderate who served in the state Senate from 1974 to 1987 and then ran again and won in 2010.

Other possible contenders include former Dane County Executive Kathleen Falk, former US Rep. Dave Obey, Assembly Democratic leader Peter Barca, US Rep. Ron Kind, and Mahlon Mitchell, president of the Professional Fire Fighters of Wisconsin. The most likely, and best-known, candidate is Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett, who lost to Walker in 2010.

When the recall election would be held is also uncertain. If the signatures are verified without contest, state elections officials say, the earliest it could be held is late March, although if either side requests a primary, it could be as late as June.

A loophole in state law allows both sides to raise unlimited sums. Walker is at an advantage: He reportedly raised more than $5.1 million late last year and is expected to almost double that in the coming months.

“The law benefits Walker, and gives him more time to raise big bucks,” says Mr. Burden.

All eyes are on the signature count starting this week and expected to take place in a state-owned building in Madison that was being prepared with surveillance cameras and barbed wire security gates. A county circuit court ruled last week that election officials must verify each signature for accuracy, a task usually reserved for the petitioning party and the opposition.

The added burden means more time and money. The month-long process will now likely be stretched to at least 60 days and it will now involve $100,000 in computer software and technical assistance. The new hardware will electronically read and create a database of signatures that staffers will then review individually.

revelette
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 Jan, 2012 08:49 am
@BillRM,
If all that law did was take away automatic union dues, then I wouldn't have a problem with it. What I have a problem with is taking away workers rights to collective bargaining.

That said, I really don't see this effort succeeding.
parados
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 Jan, 2012 04:38 pm
@revelette,
They dropped them off today

Quote:
The sheer number of signatures being filed against Walker - nearly as many as the total votes cast for the governor in November 2010 and almost twice as many as those needed to trigger a recall election - ensure the election will be held, said officials with the state Democratic Party and United Wisconsin, the group that launched the Walker recall.


http://www.jsonline.com/news/statepolitics/recall18-8g3r7ui-137489833.html

Walker may need everyone that didn't sign the petition to vote for him in the coming election. The effort to replace him may succeed quite easily.
failures art
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 Jan, 2012 06:24 pm
@parados,
I have to hand it to WI. Real citizens in action. It's pretty impressive. When would the vote be? I ask because if a GOP Governor is kicked out in the lead up months to a Presidential election, the narrative on labor rights could heavily swing in Democrats favor.

A
R
T
parados
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 Jan, 2012 06:37 pm
@failures art,
They are predicting June or July depending on court challenges, primaries, etc.
parados
 
  1  
Reply Sat 21 Jan, 2012 10:15 pm
@parados,
Quote:
Wisconsin recall webcam so boring it's mesmerizing


http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/46086403/ns/local_news-minneapolis_st_paul_mn/#.TxuMk0-_8Z4


Watch people shuffle papers and scan documents!!
parados
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Feb, 2012 04:41 pm
@parados,
Ongoing court rulings in the case of recalling Scott Walker
The Scott Walker camp went judge shopping to find a judge to give them another 30 days and force the Government Accountability Board to scrutinize the signatures above what the law explicitly states.
http://tpmdc.talkingpointsmemo.com/2011/12/judge-rules-against-wis-dems-intervention-in-gop-recall-lawsuit.php

The appeal overturned much of that when the Recall people went appeals court shopping:
http://www.jsonline.com/news/statepolitics/appeals-court-vacates-order-on-the-review-of-recall-petitions-j742d2a-138667409.html

Finally today, Walker went back to the first judge to extend another 2 weeks his time to contest signatures. That judge turned him down.
http://www.jsonline.com/news/statepolitics/judge-to-walker-no-extra-time-to-review-recall-petitions-mq48579-139537128.html
parados
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Feb, 2012 04:46 pm
@parados,
Meanwhile the GOP in Wisconsin appears to be playing fast and loose with redistricting. Federal judges ordered they have to turn over emails which show their conversations in setting the new districts. It appears there was a lot of collusion between private parties and the GOP legislators, including legislators instructing those they called to testify on how they should testify.

http://www.jsonline.com/news/statepolitics/federal-judges-slam-gop-lawmakers-over-redistricting-secrecy-0l47pqm-139467038.html
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Feb, 2012 04:50 pm
@parados,
The GOP in Wisconsin is a basket case; they all belong in the looney house.

The problem is, conservatives voted them into office. Who's loonier? The government employees or the voters? Flip a coin.
0 Replies
 
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Mon 27 Feb, 2012 11:06 am
Wisconsin governor will not challenge recall signatures

inShare.0Share thisEmailPrintRelated TopicsPolitics »
MADISON, Wisconsin | Mon Feb 27, 2012 11:49am EST

MADISON, Wisconsin (Reuters) - Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker will not challenge any of the more than one million signatures gathered by opponents to force a vote to recall the controversial Republican, saying that his campaign did not have enough time to review them.

Walker faced a deadline Monday to file challenges after a Dane County judge granted him a 20-day extension beyond the 10 days allotted under state law. Walker also sought an additional two weeks but was turned down.

"We faced an impossible timeline," Walker spokeswoman Ciara Matthews told wispolitics.com.

Walker has been in office only a year but he angered Democrats and union members by pushing through the state legislature a law stripping public sector unions of many of their powers. Republicans said the law was necessary to improve the condition of state finances but Democrats accuse him of "union busting." Tens of thousands of people marched on the state capital to protest last winter.

Matthews said recall organizers were given 60 days to collect signatures, twice the time the campaign was given to review them.

"It obviously takes more time to verify signatures than it does to collect them," she said.

Democrats were not immediately available to comment on Walker's decision not to challenge the signatures.

(Reporting by Jeff Mayers; Editing by Greg McCune)

0 Replies
 
Cycloptichorn
 
  1  
Reply Fri 16 Mar, 2012 09:25 am
http://www.jsonline.com/news/statepolitics/state-sen-galloway-to-resign-4c4jk6e-142927885.html

Quote:
State Sen. Pam Galloway, who faces a recall election this summer, plans to resign from the Senate shortly, leaving an even split between Republicans and Democrats.

Senate Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald (R-Juneau) confirmed her plans Friday and said he believed Galloway would make an announcement later in the day.

Fitzgerald said Galloway was resigning because of health issues in her family. He said he was confident she could have won the recall election.


If the Dems win a single recall election out of the three remaining, they will take control of the WI State Senate.

Cycloptichorn
0 Replies
 
Irishk
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 Apr, 2012 10:08 am
Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker slightly ahead of all four Democrats in recall race.

From Dailykos' PPP poll.

(Explanation at above link).
0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  2  
Reply Sun 20 May, 2012 07:43 pm
We recommend Walker; his removal isn't justified

WJS Editorial Board

Quote:
No governor in recent memory has been so controversial. No governor in America is so polarizing. Everyone has an opinion about Gov. Scott Walker of Wisconsin.

Here's ours: We see no reason to remove Walker from office. We recommend him in the June 5 recall election.

Walker's rematch with Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett was prompted by one issue: Walker's tough stance with the state's public-employee unions. It's inconceivable that the recall election would be occurring absent that. And a disagreement over a single policy is simply not enough to justify a vote against the governor.

A Marquette Law School Poll in January showed that many people in the Badger State agree. In that poll, 72% of Republicans, 44% of independents and 17% of Democrats said recalls should be limited to criminal wrongdoing. Republican state Rep. Robin Vos has proposed tightening the recall mechanism; he should continue to push for that after the election, regardless of who wins.

Walker brought some of this animosity on himself. He chose an in-your-face style from the start. To his credit, the governor now acknowledges that he did a poor job of building support for his policies. "The one thing if I could go back in time is I would try to spend a little bit more time building the case," he told the Editorial Board earlier this year.

Whether any amount of explaining would have made a difference is questionable considering the breadth of Walker's vision. We think his limits on collective bargaining went too far. We think Republicans generally took an unfortunate sharp turn to the right on social issues. That led to bills in the Legislature promoting abstinence-only education, limiting women's health options and creating a concealed-carry law with insufficient training requirements.

At the same time, legislators couldn't build consensus on far more important legislation, including a bill to allow additional mining in northern Wisconsin and another to create a pool of funds for promising start-up companies. Both bills were casualties of legislative arrogance by the party Walker leads.

Walker came to office promising that 250,000 new private-sector jobs would be created on his watch. But even considering the more favorable statistics released by the Walker administration last week, job creation has been sluggish.

There are several possible reasons for this: 1) Walker overpromised, forgetting that there is only so much that any one politician can do to promote private-sector job growth; 2) the political turmoil in the state is inhibiting job creation (Walker's argument); or 3) Walker's policies are killing job growth (Democrats' argument).

We think choices 1 and 2 are the most likely reasons. Walker's policies simply haven't been in place long enough to know whether they are to blame. Our view is that global trends, including the turmoil in Europe, have much more to do with whether Wisconsin's companies succeed than the policies of a single politician. We also believe that, at the margins, the yearlong tantrum over Walker has been harmful.

To his credit, Walker has helped to right the state's finances with a minimum of gimmicks - the governor reported recently that the state may be able to book a $154 million surplus next year. This good news has been lost in the clutter surrounding an unnecessary recall election that will cost as much as $18 million just to stage, according to the Government Accountability Board.

The governor also has made a good-faith attempt to shore up the state's economic development efforts through the creation of a public-private entity to head up those efforts, through reform of the state's tort laws, through a series of business tax breaks and by improving Wisconsin's image with business leaders outside the state.

And while we think Act 10 - the law that clipped the wings of most public-employee unions in the state - was an overreach of political power, we understand and supported the need to rein in the state's labor costs. Municipalities and school districts as well as the state needed more control over their budgets, which Act 10 provided.

But Walker's zeal to give governments more control over their destinies was, we believe, matched only by his zeal to deal a harsh blow to a key Democratic constituency. That has made him a national hero to Republicans.

Democrats claim the recall election is about far more than Act 10. The most serious of the charges on their bill of particulars is the ongoing John Doe investigation being conducted by the Milwaukee County district attorney's office. The investigation, which has been going on for nearly two years, has looked into a variety of activities during the time Walker was county executive. Prosecutors have charged three ex-Walker aides and two others; more charges may be coming. Walker has set up a legal-defense fund.

But the governor has insisted that he is not a target of the investigation and that he is cooperating. While the investigation surely is troubling, no evidence revealed so far implicates Walker. Overzealous political associates sometimes get in trouble. The John Doe probe doesn't justify a vote against the governor.

As for Barrett, we think he has been a good steward of Wisconsin's largest city. Taxes and fees are up, but that's hardly unreasonable given the depth of the budget restraints. Services remain solid. Barrett and his team have helped shepherd new development in the Menomonee Valley, downtown and in the neighborhoods. The mayor has helped heal the often raw relationship between Milwaukee and its suburbs.

But as a leader, the mayor can be tentative and slow to act. While building consensus is admirable - the opposite of the approach Walker often takes - the mayor can be risk-averse to a fault. One example: He has been slow to articulate a vision for economic development in the city and to develop a strategic economic plan for Milwaukee that dovetails with regional efforts.

On the campaign trail, Walker has tried to blame rising taxes and poor job growth in Milwaukee on Barrett. In a campaign stop last week, Walker said that people do not want to see Wisconsin "become another Milwaukee."

But Walker's attacks on the state's largest city are overblown and divisive. He forgets to mention the fallout from the worst recession in 80 years or his own responsibility in cutting state shared revenue. Or the fact that he was Milwaukee County executive during the downturn.

Strip away such purple rhetoric, and you find that Barrett, like Walker, is a capable and honorable public servant. But this election isn't about Tom Barrett. It's about Scott Walker.

Even if you disagree with Walker's policies, does that justify cutting short his term as governor? And if so, where does such logic lead? To more recall elections? More turmoil?

It's time to end the bickering and get back to the business of the state. We've had our differences with the governor, but he deserves a chance to complete his term. We recommended him in 2010. We see no reason to change that recommendation. We urge voters to support Walker in the June 5 recall election.

http://www.jsonline.com/news/opinion/we-recommend-walker-his-removal-isnt-justified-l55ecb6-152111305.html
Irishk
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 May, 2012 04:56 pm
@hawkeye10,
Ouch. Bet that kind of ruined Barrett's weekend. OTH, it probably fired up his base.
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 May, 2012 05:18 pm
@Irishk,
Irishk wrote:

Ouch. Bet that kind of ruined Barrett's weekend. OTH, it probably fired up his base.

Everything I have read inticates that the Repubs are more fired-up and better funded than are the Dems. At this point the Dems seem to be down to hoping that they don't get embarrised by the vote total, because that would have national consequences.
0 Replies
 
Irishk
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 May, 2012 03:40 pm
Intrade gives Walker a 90.3% chance of winning the June 5 recall.
 

Related Topics

Wisconsin Teachers Unions Collapsing - Discussion by gungasnake
Chicago Teachers: Are They Nuts? - Discussion by hawkeye10
The case for getting rid of public unions - Discussion by gungasnake
Why the anti-union animosity? - Discussion by joefromchicago
Philadelphia Transit Union Strike - Discussion by maporsche
Pros and cons of unions - Discussion by kickycan
The Labor Movement - Discussion by edgarblythe
 
Copyright © 2014 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.06 seconds on 10/24/2014 at 10:10:58