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Can I use "cooling racks" in the oven?

 
 
Reply Thu 21 Oct, 2010 07:10 pm
I've googled this but there seems to be many answers, none of the definitive.

I bought some racks today that I think will work -- they say "non-stick bakeware" but it doesn't say anything about putting them in the oven.

I have a recipe I want to try that requires me to bake on a rack and I couldn't find anything that was specifically an oven friendly rack.

Thanks!
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Type: Question • Score: 3 • Views: 63,727 • Replies: 9
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Intrepid
 
  1  
Reply Thu 21 Oct, 2010 07:52 pm
@boomerang,
Where else would you put bakeware? hmmm
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Thu 21 Oct, 2010 07:58 pm
@boomerang,
I think if it's metal or enameled then it should work.

"America's Test Kitchen" made shake-and-bake chicken using wire cooling racks sitting on a cookie sheet.
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Thu 21 Oct, 2010 08:11 pm
It's a Test Kitchen recipe that I want to try!

Most things that are multi-use say so specifically..... like Pyrex.... "microwave, oven, dishwasher safe -- do not use on stovetop".

These racks say "dishwasher safe". That's it.
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Thu 21 Oct, 2010 08:52 pm
@boomerang,
What are they made out of?
0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  2  
Reply Thu 21 Oct, 2010 11:05 pm
@boomerang,
Most non-stick materials can't be used above temperatures above 400 degrees without emitting toxic fumes.

Using cooling racks in a sheet-pan for roasting items in the oven is a common practice in the food industry.

If you are in doubt about the materials, don't use it. Better to err on the safe side.

Some alternatives:

If you are roasting something like meat, you can use a layer of root vegetables below the meat to lift the meat up off the floor of the pan. Another thing people sometimes use are the burners from a gas stove, just wrap them in foil. You might also consider placing the item directly on the rack of your oven and place a pan under it on the shelf below to catch drippings. If you have a toaster oven, consider using one of the racks from that oven in a sheet pan. If you have some of the Ball lids used for canning, you can fill the floor of a sheet pan with them before placing your item on them.
0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Thu 21 Oct, 2010 11:11 pm
@boomerang,
I checked the Cook's Illustrated website and found a similar question on their forums:

http://www.cooksillustrated.com/ibb/posts.aspx?postID=270095

Question:

I'm sure someone asked this question before, but how can you tell if a cooling rack is going to be safe to use in the oven? I've noticed that Cook's Illustrated often recommends doing this (like for the recent tandoori chicken recipe), but I'm hesitant to use mine, as I'm not sure if it was meant for temperatures this high.

On a related note, does CI have any tips on how to clean racks after they've been used for cooking things with sticky sauces? (like the oven-roasted BBQ ribs, or the tandoori chicken?) Mine is too big for my dishwasher.

Answers:

Quote:
It's called a business expense, and I suspect they go out and buy new ones! I tried it for some oven fried crusted fish, and a few other similar things. The racks spent days soaking & scrubbing to get the crust off. DW just didn't do it. Back to foil or parchment for me. Crumple it up and toss it after cooking. And if you don't want the product stewing in it's own juice, crumple the foil first, don't flatten too much, apply a release spray,and then add the items to be baked. Just my work around.


Quote:
I have used my cooking racks for years as roasting racks in ovens up to 500 degrees. Almost all are safe for use in the oven with the exception of the teflon coated racks which are safe at 400 degrees and lower.

You will find that your racks will suffer from high heat and a build up of grease. Most of the damage is cosmetic and a good soak in hot soapy water immediately after cooking, and before any cool-down period will help. I sometimes use Dawn Power Dissolver on my racks but it is really cheaper to plan on replacing them every 10 years.

I do have some very heavy (1.8" chrome plated steel rod) racks that are my best roasting racks. Unfortunately these cannnot be replaced and deserve special attention. That means allowing the grease to build up to provide a fully seasoned and non-stick surface for my roasts.

I am always on the lookout for heavy stainless racks to fit my fry pans, paella pans and roasting pans, with no success.

Resist the temptation to use your oven's self-cleaning cycle. This will remove the grease, the non-stick lining and the chromium finish. The rack will rust away following that treatment.


0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Thu 21 Oct, 2010 11:15 pm
@boomerang,
Here is their test results from the Equipment Corner about cooling racks:

http://www.cooksillustrated.com/equipment/overview.asp?docid=11491

If you're a member of their website, you'll be able to see the list of brands tested and the evaluations of each.

boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Fri 22 Oct, 2010 07:57 am
@Butrflynet,
Thanks Butrflynet!

I think I'll give them a trial before doing any actual cooking on them but now I have some backup ideas if there appears to be a problem.
0 Replies
 
LynnePow
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Jun, 2014 08:36 pm
@Intrepid,
These are not considered bakeware. They are cooling racks to cool cakes, cookies, etc. They say dishwasher safe but they tell you not to use dishwasher powder or liquid because it will damage the finish. You need plain silver colored baking racks.
0 Replies
 
 

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