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Is "someone unfortunately passed away" a proper expression?

 
 
Io
 
Reply Wed 6 Oct, 2010 08:42 am
I kind of regard "unfortunately" as redundant (anyway, when is it ever fortunate?) So, is "someone unfortunately passed away" a proper English expression?

:-)

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Type: Question • Score: 2 • Views: 3,420 • Replies: 12
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CalamityJane
 
  0  
Reply Wed 6 Oct, 2010 08:44 am
@Io ,
No, definitely not! Someone "sadly" and "unexpected" passed away.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Oct, 2010 08:49 am
@Io ,
I don't much care for the expression, but I do hear it used quite a bit. It is commonly used, even if it's not "proper".
0 Replies
 
blueveinedthrobber
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Oct, 2010 09:31 am
the word is in the wrong place that's all. it should be, unfortunately, someone passed away. Unless it's Dick Cheney or Glenn Beck. then it's Yee Haw...someone passed zaway.
0 Replies
 
PUNKEY
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Oct, 2010 02:21 pm
Yes, it's said all the time:

someone, unfortunately, passed away

someone, mercifully, passed away

someone, at last, passed away

0 Replies
 
MonaLeeza
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Oct, 2010 03:37 pm
@Io ,
Death is fortunate when someone is suffering (whether it be the dying person or those around them) 'Unfortunate' isn't redundant.
glitterbag
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Oct, 2010 04:19 pm
@MonaLeeza,
My son sent this to me, it's from the Onion and something that I would not normally pass along, but reading Bear's remark, I thought he might enjoy. But I wonder, if I think it's funny does that mean I'm going to hell? Maybe I can go in a handcart.

http://www.theonion.com/video/victim-in-fatal-car-accident-tragically-not-glenn,14380/
0 Replies
 
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Oct, 2010 02:35 pm

It's fine-

John Smith unfortunately passed away before paying me back the money he borrowed.
0 Replies
 
Infanta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Oct, 2010 05:38 am
@Io ,
May I have your e-mail address, please?
0 Replies
 
JazzMinnie
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Oct, 2010 02:54 pm
@Io ,
No but when are English expressions proper?
0 Replies
 
JazzMinnie
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Oct, 2010 02:55 pm
@CalamityJane,
"No, definitely not! Someone "sadly" and "unexpected" passed away."
Unexpectedly not unexpected. Some one unexpected passed away. Unless you are trying to say it as if a random person passed away, which I have reason to believe you are not, you should use unexpectedly.
0 Replies
 
glitterbag
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Oct, 2010 12:12 am
Oh come on folks, isn't the unfortunately passed away better than reading "Sweet Mother of God, 'so and so' fortunately passed away last night."? Maybe it would be understandable if the drafter had been waiting a long time for an inheritance........But I still think I would rather see "unfortunately Passed". But I'm a tad old school.
JazzMinnie
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Oct, 2010 07:53 am
@glitterbag,
No being old school has nothing to do with it. That's how I feel.
0 Replies
 
 

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