11
   

If We Dropped A Billion Balls From The Same Height.

 
 
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Jun, 2010 06:54 am
@mark noble,
Even in the real world, you could repeat the experiment until the balls touched the ground simultaneously*.

*Within your measurement error, at least. In the real world, there will always be measurement error.
0 Replies
 
parados
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Jun, 2010 07:03 am
@mark noble,
Quote:
It is the real world answer I am interested in.

real world? Really?

Quote:
If we dropped a billion balls, of equal size and mass, from a net, 2 miles high,


Quote:
All balls are released simultaneously

From a net? in the real world? Really?

Quote:
All is level, no balls can bump into other balls.

Level? in a net in the real world? Really?
mark noble
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Jun, 2010 07:07 am
@Soul Brother,
Soul Brother wrote:


What would lead you to think that out of 1 billion balls, none could possibly land at precisely the same time?


Hi Sb,

Because in the sub-quanta I don't believe that ANY two things in the entire universe at-hand occur at EXACTLY the same time.

TIME being the measurement BETWEEN two occurences.

Think about it?

Thank you for your interesting post, my friend.
Have a great day.
Mark...
mark noble
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Jun, 2010 07:12 am
@parados,
Hi Parados,

You're missing the point here.
Read between the lines.

If you think about it for long enough, I am sure it will come to you.

Kind regards.
Mark...
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Jun, 2010 07:13 am
@mark noble,
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planck_time

Quote:
In physics, the Planck time, (tP), is the unit of time in the system of natural units known as Planck units. It is the time required for light to travel, in a vacuum, a distance of 1 Planck length.
laughoutlood
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Jun, 2010 07:32 am
@mark noble,
My, my, my aren't you the ballsy one. Why ask about quantum physics in rooms such as this?
0 Replies
 
parados
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Jun, 2010 07:33 am
@mark noble,
Quote:
You're missing the point here.
Read between the lines.

I wrote between the lines. Perhaps it's you that is missing the dull that isn't between the lines.
mark noble
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Jun, 2010 07:58 am
@parados,
Hi Parados,

Perhaps?

Kind regards.
Mark...
0 Replies
 
mark noble
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Jun, 2010 08:08 am
@DrewDad,
Hi Drew,

Thank you for participating. I am leaning toward Planck-time, but as you know: the theory of' remains theory only, and probably always will. I don't believe we will ever be able to determine any greater depth than the attometre, outside the field of measurability anyhow.

Nevertheless; Is it possible that no two occurences happen simultaneously? Of course - Probable? Who knows.

It's great to hear other's opinions though.

Thank you again Drew.
Mark...
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Jun, 2010 08:14 am
@mark noble,
I'm not questioning simultaneity. I'm questioning if you can measure simultaneity.
mark noble
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Jun, 2010 08:16 am
@DrewDad,
Hi Drew,

Me too.

Mark...
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Jun, 2010 08:28 am
@mark noble,
Ah. I thought you were questioning whether simultaneity can occur.
mark noble
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Jun, 2010 08:33 am
@DrewDad,
Hi Drew,
Isn't that the same thing? i.e. If something is able to occur - It has to be measured to prove thus?

Kind regards.
Mark...
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Jun, 2010 08:59 am
@mark noble,
I don't believe so. Events exist even if they aren't measured.

The map is not the territory. Evolution existed before Darwin described it. The sun shone on the Earth for billions of years before Einstein wrote his equation.
mark noble
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Jun, 2010 09:05 am
@DrewDad,
Hi Drew,

I can't not agree with that. But, until they are measured, we cannot prove them or perceive them with utmost clarity.

I like chatting to you, you have a logical method of deducing.

Thank you.
Mark...
0 Replies
 
rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Jun, 2010 03:58 pm
@Soul Brother,
Soul Brother wrote:
What would lead you to think that out of 1 billion balls, none could possibly land at precisely the same time? it actually seems rather unlikely that such a thing would happen.

Because at a sub-atomic level, the interaction of two objects occurs between electron clouds (probability clouds), and the uncertainty principle says that we can never know both the exact time and position an electron occupies. The question of simultaneity becomes undefined at those levels, so it is impossible for any selected events to occur at precisely the same time when measuring things from a quantum level.
0 Replies
 
north
 
  1  
Reply Thu 2 Dec, 2010 10:03 pm
@mark noble,
mark noble wrote:

Hi All,

If we dropped a billion balls, of equal size and mass, from a net, 2 miles high, at exactly the same time - would...

1) One ball touch ground first?
2) One ball touch ground last?
3) Any balls touch ground at exactly the same time?

Any and all views or opinions in relation to these questions are welcome indeed.

Thank you.
Kind regards.
Mark...


spread over an area of the billion balls , no, assuming all other parameters being equal
0 Replies
 
kennethamy
 
  2  
Reply Mon 6 Dec, 2010 07:26 am
@mark noble,
mark noble wrote:

Hi All,

If we dropped a billion balls, of equal size and mass, from a net, 2 miles high, at exactly the same time - would...

1) One ball touch ground first?
2) One ball touch ground last?
3) Any balls touch ground at exactly the same time?

Any and all views or opinions in relation to these questions are welcome indeed.

Thank you.
Kind regards.
Mark...
0 Replies
 
g day
 
  1  
Reply Sun 19 Dec, 2010 07:15 pm
@sarek,

Lets say you do it in a vaccuum and each ball is totally inert - so it doesn't react to the environment around it at all.

I would expect you'd see minute differences in when the balls all landed - caused by quantum effects (spacetime isn't completely empty at a quantum level) but we'd have no way of measuring time that accurately to see these quantum effects. That is the time gap between the first and the last ball touching down might be say 10 ^ -30 seconds. Over that period light travels about the size of a Hydrogen proton. We don't have near the instrumentation that can measure such small (but predicted) quantum effects.
raprap
 
  1  
Reply Sun 19 Dec, 2010 11:12 pm
@g day,
If the balls were of significant mass the quantum effects would be negligible.
 

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