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clunk clunk noise when turning.

 
 
Reply Thu 17 Jun, 2010 04:33 am
when im turning sharp corners it sounds like a clunking noise up front some where. is this the CV joint?? any knowledge of cost to fix??
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Type: Question • Score: 0 • Views: 4,431 • Replies: 9
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msolga
 
  1  
Reply Thu 17 Jun, 2010 06:01 am
@mrs-jamesbond,
I'm sorry, I don't know the answer to your query, mrs-jamesbond.
But those clunk clunk noises do sound very concerning!
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Thu 17 Jun, 2010 03:02 pm
@mrs-jamesbond,
It does sound like a CV joint, and I can't think of anything else on the type of vehicle that uses CV joints.
0 Replies
 
talk72000
 
  1  
Reply Thu 17 Jun, 2010 03:08 pm
@mrs-jamesbond,
Could also be the one or both of your front wheel bearing are worn out. Do you find steering difficult? If so, it is probably the bearings as it happened to me recently.
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Solmeci
 
  1  
Reply Thu 17 Jun, 2010 09:49 pm
@mrs-jamesbond,
A clicking or popping noise when turning is the one of the indications of CV joint problems.
0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Thu 17 Jun, 2010 10:18 pm
@mrs-jamesbond,
How much might it cost?

I recently had the complete front end of my car (Mercury Cougar) replaced by a neighbor friend who does auto repairs in his garage and mostly just charges for parts and a bit extra for his labor. He replaced the joints, balls and bushings on both wheels (and also replaced brake pads) for about $600 including his labor. He advised I get the wheels aligned at a shop. I took it to a franchise auto repair shop and they talked me into also replacing the rocker arm on just one side of the car, and did nothing else other than top off the freon in the a/c. I had all four wheels aligned and not just the front. That cost another $450, most of which was labor. The neighbor mechanic said the rocker arm replacement was totally unnecessary and I shouldn't have had it done.

Yeah, it was a lot of money, but my car is 17 years old, has less than 50,000 miles on it, and hasn't cost me very much in maintenance/repair until now. The car is still in very good condition and worth the continuing investment for at least a few more years until something major breaks down.
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dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Thu 17 Jun, 2010 11:31 pm
Quote:
I had all four wheels aligned and not just the front.

to the best of my knowledge there is no adjustment on the rear wheels of cars.
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Thu 17 Jun, 2010 11:42 pm
@mrs-jamesbond,
Could also be a fault with power steering.
0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Thu 17 Jun, 2010 11:45 pm
@dadpad,
dadpad wrote:

Quote:
I had all four wheels aligned and not just the front.

to the best of my knowledge there is no adjustment on the rear wheels of cars.


http://www.familycar.com/alignment.htm

Quote:
Four-Wheel Alignments

There are two main types of 4-wheel alignments. In each case, the technician will place an instrument on all four wheels. In the first type the rear toe and tracking is checked, but all adjustments are made at the front wheels. This is done on vehicles that do not have adjustments on the rear. The second type is a full 4-wheel alignment where the adjustments are first made to true up the rear alignment, then the front is adjusted. A full 4-wheel alignment will cost more than the other type because there is more work involved.


http://www.asashop.org/autoinc/dec98/mech.htm

Quote:
The type of alignment performed usually is conditional upon the amount of adjustment that's feasible on a particular vehicle, as well as the shop's equipment capability. On solid-axle, rear-wheel-drive (RWD) vehicles, for example, a thrust alignment is usually performed so the front wheels are aligned to the rear axle. The drive direction of the rear axle is referred to as the thrust line, which should in theory be the same as the geometric center of the vehicle.

A four-wheel alignment involves adjusting the rear wheels to achieve proper camber and toe and a thrust angle as close to zero as possible, then adjusting the front wheels to the same vehicle centerline. Four-wheel alignments are recommended for most front-wheel-drive cars, mini-vans, some sport utility vehicles and RWD vehicles with independent suspension.

Many alignment shops today offer a standard thrust alignment and charge extra for time and materials if rear-wheel adjustments are required. This approach eliminates different vehicle owners paying the same price, when only one of them requires rear-wheel alignment.

To perform a four-wheel alignment, a four-sensor machine is required. Turnplates or rear slip plates at all four corners are needed during both four-wheel and thrust alignments. The rear wheels must be allowed to relax to their normal position to achieve proper readings whether they are to be adjusted or not.

Today's computerized alignment equipment can identify and graphically display the alignment capabilities of a vehicle by make and model. In addition, the machine will do all the mental gymnastics of shim selection and orientation, which leaves the technician free to do what he or she does best - diagnose and correct the alignment problem.

Some newer model alignment machines feature cordless sensors that use high-frequency transmitters instead of cables to send data to the console. Other new features include a ride height option that shortens measurement time to just a few seconds per wheel and provides on-screen videos to illustrate the adjustment method on the vehicle being serviced. Some machines use a laser, similar to a pointer, for toe measurement.

In addition to providing caster, camber and toe readings, alignment machines can be used as a diagnostic tool. Diagnostic angles such as steering axis inclination (SAI), included angle (IA), setback and turning radius can help the technician to identify problems that otherwise might be overlooked.
0 Replies
 
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Thu 17 Jun, 2010 11:54 pm
well... you learn something new every day.
I drive a RWD vehical thats about 30 years old.
0 Replies
 
 

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