Lily
 
Reply Tue 4 Aug, 2009 05:41 am
Hamlet is one of Shakespeare's most famous works. But what does it mean to the teenager of today, since it's a play of yesterday? Not very much, to be honest. Some lines are of course exquisite, but sometimes I just thought "yada, yada, yada" when I read it. Lot of talking, little action. It's not even half as moving as "Romeo and Juliett". But it is still something there that makes understand why it's a masterpiece. And I have to remind myself that it is a play, not a ordinary book. I think it might have been better to see the play than to read it.

I don't sympathize with Hamlet very much. IMO, he only feels sorry for himself and his destiny and he is a bit of an ass. I wouldn't describe him as noble. I mean, stop whining and do something about it!
http://artlung.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2007/10/millais-ophelia.jpg
But despite this, if I where Ophelia, I'd try to marry him. Yes, handsome, powerful and rich, my kind of man:shifty:.

I think the king of Denmark, Hamlet's uncle and stepfather, has some intresting lines. He sometimes seems to be regretful, but is still planning more murders.

I think that maybe I should have read a more modern version, a lot of words gave me "Bible-feeling" (My Bible is the old swedish version), the language was very far from everyday-language.

So, what did I think of it? It has aged quite well, but I don't like it. But I don't dislike it either. It just didn't move me.
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Discussion • Score: 0 • Views: 3,560 • Replies: 14
No top replies

 
urangutan
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Aug, 2009 05:54 am
@Lily,
"But what does it mean to the teenager of today, I mean stop whining and do something about it!"

Now if you wrote those two lines together, as so, you would see that it offers teenagers a look at themselves through an adults perspective. Moan, ***** and carry on. (The word that may appear sparkled was the term used to indicate a female of the dog.) Funny really, today teenagers dictate the lives of preteens, through music and video, while they feel they are in control of everything including their love. All us adults can do is ignore or applaud. I choose to ignore, as I am an Agnostic and I would rather not preach. Besides my child is five and i must save my strength for then. LOL
0 Replies
 
Catchabula
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Aug, 2009 06:08 am
@Lily,
Thanks for your honest appreciation, Lily. Perhaps it will come more alive to you if you saw an adaptation for the big screen. There's an old movie with (Sir) Laurence Olivier, and a more recent one by and with Kenneth Brannagh. Mind that Shakespeare will evolve with you, this is just a first meeting. Give the guy a chance ;-).
0 Replies
 
kennethamy
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Aug, 2009 06:12 am
@Lily,
Lily;81187 wrote:
Hamlet is one of Shakespeare's most famous works. But what does it mean to the teenager of today, since it's a play of yesterday? Not very much, to be honest. Some lines are of course exquisite, but sometimes I just thought "yada, yada, yada" when I read it. Lot of talking, little action. It's not even half as moving as "Romeo and Juliett". But it is still something there that makes understand why it's a masterpiece. And I have to remind myself that it is a play, not a ordinary book. I think it might have been better to see the play than to read it.

I don't sympathize with Hamlet very much. IMO, he only feels sorry for himself and his destiny and he is a bit of an ass. I wouldn't describe him as noble. I mean, stop whining and do something about it!
http://artlung.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2007/10/millais-ophelia.jpg
But despite this, if I where Ophelia, I'd try to marry him. Yes, handsome, powerful and rich, my kind of man:shifty:.

I think the king of Denmark, Hamlet's uncle and stepfather, has some intresting lines. He sometimes seems to be regretful, but is still planning more murders.

I think that maybe I should have read a more modern version, a lot of words gave me "Bible-feeling" (My Bible is the old swedish version), the language was very far from everyday-language.

So, what did I think of it? It has aged quite well, but I don't like it. But I don't dislike it either. It just didn't move me.


Why do you think that Hamlet was handsome?
Lily
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Aug, 2009 07:23 am
@kennethamy,
kennethamy;81194 wrote:
Why do you think that Hamlet was handsome?


His father was very good looking, his mother was beautiful, and therefor should Hamlet be handsome. And since he's the maincaracter it's only more plausible
xris
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Aug, 2009 07:31 am
@Lily,
Its the language,it enters you and creates emotions reserved for dark and forbidding times.Perchance to dream..
kennethamy
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Aug, 2009 01:13 pm
@Lily,
Lily;81207 wrote:
His father was very good looking, his mother was beautiful, and therefor should Hamlet be handsome. And since he's the maincaracter it's only more plausible


We don't know how his mother looked, and we have only Hamlet's opinion about his father. Good looking people need not have good looking children. Shakespeare has many main characters who are not good looking. Iago, Richard the Third. Anyway, are not Swedes better looking than Danes?
Catchabula
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Aug, 2009 01:59 pm
@Lily,
Well hm, I'm afraid I have to agree with Kennethamy here. The conception of Hamlet as a pale slender young man in black pantyhose goes back to the 19th century (romantic) reception of Shakespeare. Don't forget the story plays in Denmark and goes back to a period far before the Elisabethan Age. Did Hamlet had a beard? Probably. But does this even matter?
0 Replies
 
Lily
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Aug, 2009 03:31 pm
@kennethamy,
kennethamy;81279 wrote:
We don't know how his mother looked, and we have only Hamlet's opinion about his father. Good looking people need not have good looking children. Shakespeare has many main characters who are not good looking. Iago, Richard the Third.

Yes, you're right. Poor Ophelia would have had to settle with just the power and the money. But it is a bit interesting that I, born in a quite superficial time, think that it's natural that the maincaracter is pretty. If Hamlet would have been written today he probably would have been handsome, and a little more noble. (And might have been called emo)
kennethamy;81279 wrote:
Anyway, are not Swedes better looking than Danes?

Yes we are:a-ok:
xris
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Aug, 2009 05:55 am
@Lily,
Lily;81305 wrote:
Yes, you're right. Poor Ophelia would have had to settle with just the power and the money. But it is a bit interesting that I, born in a quite superficial time, think that it's natural that the maincaracter is pretty. If Hamlet would have been written today he probably would have been handsome, and a little more noble. (And might have been called emo)

Yes we are:a-ok:
As a young student learning engineering at night school, the opposite class to mine, was full of young Swedish girls learning english.I had no chance of concentrating on my tutor,it ruined a whole year.I dont know many Danes but my memory of those Swedish girls gives me goose bumps.
0 Replies
 
kennethamy
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Aug, 2009 05:41 am
@Lily,
Lily;81305 wrote:
Yes, you're right. Poor Ophelia would have had to settle with just the power and the money. But it is a bit interesting that I, born in a quite superficial time, think that it's natural that the maincaracter is pretty. If Hamlet would have been written today he probably would have been handsome, and a little more noble. (And might have been called emo)

Yes we are:a-ok:


We don't know that Hamlet was not handsome. We just do not know. We can, of course, think of how he looks in any way we like. And, I imagine, you would like to think of him as looking like Lawrence Olivier. And, maybe he did. But Hamlet had been written today, it would not have been written by Shakespeare. And then, we would not have cared how Hamlet looked.
xris
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Aug, 2009 05:46 am
@kennethamy,
The best thing about the bard was his allowance on interpretation, he allowed your imagination to create the images.Make him what thou hearts desire and by so doing he hath himself described.
0 Replies
 
Lily
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Aug, 2009 08:44 am
@kennethamy,
kennethamy;81577 wrote:
We don't know that Hamlet was not handsome. We just do not know. We can, of course, think of how he looks in any way we like. And, I imagine, you would like to think of him as looking like Lawrence Olivier.

Hehe, no to be honest I think that Hamlet looks a bit like this guyhttp://adorability.files.wordpress.com/2008/12/ed-westwick.jpgEd Westwick
0 Replies
 
Reconstructo
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Mar, 2010 05:19 pm
@Lily,
Hamlet is a genius of self-consciousness. This is why Shakespeare is great. He put self-consciousness on the stage. And this is the only way to "hold a mirror up to nature." Hamlet and Hegel are close indeed, and so was Hamlet and the Schlegels.

It's speculated that Shakespeare played the ghost in those first real performances of Hamlet. It is known that Shakespeare's son, named Hamnet, died at 11. So Shakespeare possibly wrote an ideal son, and reversed the roles of life and death. Shakes was dead. His son was living. Hamlet is post-modern. Most of us (all?) are still catching up to Shakespeare, who seems to be one of the most brilliant humans who ever lived.
0 Replies
 
charday
 
  -2  
Reply Thu 3 Mar, 2011 04:27 am
@xris,
shut up woman are you stupied hamlet isn't cute
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

 
  1. Forums
  2. » Hamlet
Copyright © 2017 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 01/18/2017 at 02:08:48