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Why Islam? Fastest Growing Religion in America

 
 
Greatknight
 
  0  
Reply Wed 9 Feb, 2011 09:27 am
Why ?
Because the truth is attracive !

It has the highest morals, values, essence ever.
It's the religion God wanted to manifest over all earthy religions !

For example :

Prophet's -peace and blessings be upon him - in his house

Hazrat Ayesha - his wife - was asked what did Prophet do at home?
She replied:î He used to be in the service of his home people; and when the time of prayer came he used to perform ablutions and go out for prayer.î
-(Muslim)

Anas has narrated:
iAllah's Messenger had the best manners of all the persons. I had an adopted brother, whose name was Abu Umair. He had a sick sparrow, who was called 'Nagheer'. Allah's Messenger used to be playful with him and ask him :
'0 Abu Umair! what has happened to your Nagheer'. i -
(Bukhari)

Of the habits and traits of the Prophet one trait was very well known that he was extremely philanthropic. He was never miserly in anything. He was very brave and courageous.
He never turned away from Truth. He was justice. loving. In his own decision he never committed any excesses or injustice. In his whole life he was truthful and an honest trustee.

Allah has commanded all the Muslims to follow the excellent habits and the best traits of the Prophet and to take guidance from the holy life of the holy Messenger.
iSurely there is in the person of Allah's .messenger an excellent example for you-for every person who has hope in Allah and the Hereafter and remember, Allah, reciting His name many times
-(Ahzab: 21)

Hazrat Khadija had told him when he was first blessed with the Divine Revelation:
iYou carry the loads of the weak people, you earn for the poor, and help a person if any trouble comes to him in following the Truth

. The river of his kindness was flowing for every body. For his companions he was a guardian, and in matters of Truth all were equal in his eyes.

He was good-looking, decent, humble and soft hearted. He was not a narrow-minded and a hard person. Quarrelling was not his habit. He never spoke obscene words. To condemn others or to praise some one excessively was beyond the pale of his character. He expressed indifference towards unnecessary things, but he was never given to pessimism.
0 Replies
 
Smileyrius
 
  1  
Reply Thu 10 Feb, 2011 04:18 am
I like Muslims, I find the couple of Muslims that I call my friends to be kind and gracious, being very very good people, better in fact than many of those that call themselves christians.
Islam, like Christianity has power to cultivate a great goodness within people, although the Quran like the bible is like an ink blot. The ability to interpret and misinterpret for ones self, allows it to be distorted, and manipulated. my personal bane is the Taxi drivers that seem to target me as a spiritually aware man and tell me that I will be consumed by fire unless I convert to islam. One should fear upsetting God just as one fears upsetting his parents, but one should not serve him out of morbid fear thats where early Christians went wrong.

Islam is likely the fastest growing religion due to its proactive preaching methods, together with its positive message. They are less obvious than Mormon's or Jehovah's Witnesses as they have no structure to their preaching, but they are an actively recruiting religion, talking to others with humility about their love for God, the relationship they have with him and the hope that they have, making it an attractive option for those that are seeking God, or have a respect for him.

Christianity's main growth seems to come from banning birth control, and the popular trend to have your newborn childs life dedicated to serving God before he has the ability to decide against such a course.
vikorr
 
  1  
Reply Tue 15 Feb, 2011 02:07 am
@Smileyrius,
Quote:
Christianity's main growth seems to come from banning birth control, and the popular trend to have your newborn childs life dedicated to serving God before he has the ability to decide against such a course.
Oh please, that's as ridiculous a statement as I've ever heard. Despite catholic child 'baptisms' the children as they grow are free to choose their own course.

And as if a islamic child has much say in his or her 'faith' - it is heavily indoctrinated into them (as a generalisation, moreso than the Christian version), and leaving the faith (ie. choosing your own path) is ten times harder for a muslim child than it is for a christian child (due to parental and cultural pressure).

As for Islams positive message - how many Islamic leaders do you actively see preaching against terrorism (rather than just making a comment here and there)? Virtually none make it to the news (though of course, maybe they do preach against terrorism). How many did you see preaching against the church bombings in Indonesia? How many did you see preaching against the violent rebellions in Thailand, China, and many other parts of the world? How many do you see preaching against Islamic states treating non-Islamic people as second class citizens? It seems to me that Islam is comparitively silent on matters of violence and prejudice that the religion has produced.
Smileyrius
 
  1  
Reply Wed 16 Feb, 2011 03:33 am
@vikorr,
Quote:
Despite catholic child 'baptisms' the children as they grow are free to choose their own course.


Your adorn my underlying point with your rebuttle good sir. Child baptisms are rendered pointless, and do nothing more than add a number to the christian community. That number does not wither when the child reclaims his life to serve his self. How many of that number replace the tag christian, with "inactive christian" I believe it said that "Faith without works are dead"

Islamic children are trained heavily from childhood, I believe the parents are sometimes a little too strict, and more choice should be apparent, but what you have to give them credit for, even thier children have more appreciation for spiritual things than many christians do in thier lives.

There is alot to be said for inculcating Gods laws in your childs heart however the choice of serving him must remain theirs. My children will be baptised only if they choose to, and only when they are ready to do so. My job is merely ensuring that they know who God is, what he says, and what it means to dedicate yourself in baptism.

Quote:
As for Islams positive message - how many Islamic leaders do you actively see preaching against terrorism (rather than just making a comment here and there)? Virtually none make it to the news (though of course, maybe they do preach against terrorism). How many did you see preaching against the church bombings in Indonesia? How many did you see preaching against the violent rebellions in Thailand, China, and many other parts of the world? How many do you see preaching against Islamic states treating non-Islamic people as second class citizens? It seems to me that Islam is comparitively silent on matters of violence and prejudice that the religion has produced.


Beware the belief that the news reports without bias or agenda.

Faith is a great motivator, and can be manipulated if it is blind. Just as the crusades were the manipulating of faith to achieve attrocities, so the islamic extremists are doing the same. The crusades were not however the message of the bible, just as the jihad against the west is not the message of the quran.

It is rather similar to "the force" in star wars... but I digress.
vikorr
 
  1  
Reply Wed 16 Feb, 2011 04:25 pm
@Smileyrius,
Smiley, I'm glad to see that you are a thinking Muslim (I presume you are muslim). Most all your points were valid.

Sadly, while your views I quite enjoy...I do not like what I see of the religion as a whole. I also note that more and more people are coming to see that Islam will dominate the world eventually - people are quite right that it is the fastest growing religion, by a long shot.

It's sad because, while Islam claims it is a religion of peace, it barely tolerates any other line of thought, and very often (mostly where Islam dominates but sometimes even where it does not) this has ended up as violence against 'the unbelievers'.

I'm quite certain that when Islam reaches a certain saturation point in the world, there will be wars fought, where Islam reaches for dominance, and the remaining free people will fight for their freedom, but that, by that time, the remaining free people will be too few in number to win. On the good side, in my country, I doubt that will be in my lifetime
Smileyrius
 
  1  
Reply Thu 17 Feb, 2011 03:28 am
@vikorr,
While I see much goodness in Islam, I also see much that I disagree with, for instance it's treatment of women, and its views on the west (I sympathise, but do not subscribe) I am a Christian that follows a more logical approach to theism. As such, I study, I observe, I listen and I seek truths.

I admire any man who believes in God with whole heart, soul and min. The man that follows his convictions and does not allow man to mould his spiritual understandings. If a man pursues righteousness with vigour, then not much can be found wrong with that man.

The problem we face, is that many get carried away with emotional and doctrinal misleadings, and what appears to be innocent faith gets shanghai'd and redirected by those that would use that faith to further thier own gain. Many pursue gods approval as translated by man, rather than studying what they learn.
Right now, faith in islam holds more motivation, as it tends to run deeper in the average follower. This incurs more active deeds in the name of God.
God will love you if you do "x", is a powerful treat to the emotional theist. If you dont do "x" God will smite you, is a powerful goad to the emotional theist. This ethos will be used to instigate, populate, and dominate wars worldwide for as long as a multi faith society exists. Any religion that supports war between nations, miss the point of its own teachings. A religion of peace pursues peace, when the world is at war.
vikorr
 
  1  
Reply Thu 17 Feb, 2011 05:32 am
@Smileyrius,
Quote:
Right now, faith in islam holds more motivation, as it tends to run deeper in the average follower. This incurs more active deeds in the name of God.
God will love you if you do "x", is a powerful treat to the emotional theist. If you dont do "x" God will smite you, is a powerful goad to the emotional theist. This ethos will be used to instigate, populate, and dominate wars worldwide .....for as long as a multi faith society exists.
That's an interesting total concept. But you do realise that where I have inserted the ..... the latter concept is not to blame for the former?

In fact, having looked at religion, which is more ideology than anything God wants...ideology will always exist. Nationalism and patriotism are two forms of ideology. Capitalism, Communism and Democracy are other forms. Cultural norms are a form. Differences in interpretation of sacred texts are also purely ideology...from that point of view, it is very unlikely that wars will ever stop, even with one religion. There are also other sound reasons why war will never stop - for there will always be someone seeking power over others, or some group of men seeking power over others, or a nation seeking power over others.

About the only religion I know that truly promotes peace is Buddhism, though I have heard it said it is more a way of life than a religion...but the acts of it's followers are obvious.
Smileyrius
 
  1  
Reply Fri 18 Feb, 2011 09:55 am
@vikorr,
I believe of the mainstream faiths, Christadelphians, Jehovahs Witnesses and the Ahmish also consider it against their beliefs to enter into war and are known to expel members who act contrary.

While the buddhist belief is a peaceful one, it has been involved in several wars in the past and pointedly, Zen buddhism is very closely linked to the sumarai warrior culture

I believe you are right with your point on ideology. In order to motivate people, you need to either create a vision that people will subscribe to, or ride on the back of another. A person is smart, but pluralised they can be fickle. Often allegance and motivation of a crowd can be redirected like water.
vikorr
 
  1  
Reply Fri 18 Feb, 2011 05:52 pm
@Smileyrius,
I presume that your first language is Arabic then? A Middle Eastern Christian?

Poetry is rarely used in English (though I'm lead to believe Arabic is poetic/passionate)
Smileyrius
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 Feb, 2011 08:01 am
@vikorr,
I am British born and bred,I tend to be quite "rare" or my mother called me "special."
I am merely a passionate soul, I am a lover of philosophy and a seeker of truths.
0 Replies
 
Greatknight
 
  0  
Reply Mon 21 Feb, 2011 03:23 pm
The Mercy and Love the Prophet (Pbuh) had for Mankind

Another example of the mercy of our beloved Prophet (Peace be upon him) is in this hadith:

Anas ibn Malik reports: “Allah’s messenger (Peace be upon him) was sitting in the Masjid with some of his companions when a Bedouin urinated inside the mosque.
The Prophet’s (Peace be upon him) companions said: ‘What is going on?’ ‘What are you doing?
The Prophet (Peace be upon him) said to them: ‘Do not interrupt him.’
He called the man and said to him: ‘These masjids are not the place where one can throw any dirt, urine or stools. They are meant for reciting the Qur’an, glorifying Allah and prayer.’ He then called for a bucket of water and he poured it over the urine.” (Bukhari, Muslim).

Our Prophet (Peace be upon him) was the best of character. In this example we had a complete stranger, doing the worst of actions in the best of places which is the house of Allah. Yet, the Prophet (Peace be upon him) due to his mercy, kindness and wisdom was patient, and treated him in the best of ways.

Our beloved Prophets (Peace be upon him) heart was filled with intense love for all of mankind irrespective of caste, creed, or colour. Once he advised his Companions to regard all people as their brothers and sisters. He added,
“You are all Adam’s offspring and Adam was born of clay.”
He wanted all of his Ummah to regard themselves as “One” body and if one part of the body was in pain then he wanted all of us to feel the pain and to help out our brothers and sisters where ever they maybe.

The blessed Prophet (Peace be upon him) taught us that, “A true believer is the one with whom others feel secure. One who returns love for hatred.” The blessed Prophet (Peace be upon him) wanted us not only to treat people well only if they treat us well but that we be good to those who are not good to us and to not to ever do wrong to those who harm us. He wanted us to show mercy and forgiveness and not to be of those who take revenge.

According to another hadith, the Prophet (Peace be upon him) once said, “By Allah, he is not a believer, by Allah, he is not a believer, by Allah, he is not a believer, with whom his neighbours are not secure.” This Hadith clearly shows how much he loved and cared for all human beings. One of the lessons he taught was that we should live among others like flowers, and not like thorns, without giving trouble to anybody.

The blessed Prophet (Peace be upon him) never beat a servant, or a woman, or anyone else. He did, of course, fight for what was right.
Yet, when he had to choose between two alternatives, he would take the easier course, provided it involved no sin. No one was more careful to avoid sin than he was.
He never sought revenge on his own behalf for any wrong done to him personally. Only if Allah’s commandments had been broken would he mete out retribution for the sake of Allah. It was such conduct which gained the Prophet (Peace be upon him) universal respect even till this day.

Once the Prophet (Peace be upon him) was seated at some place in Madinah, along with his Companions. During this time a funeral procession passed by. On seeing this, the Prophet (Peace be upon him) stood up. One of his Companions said “this funeral is that of a Jew”. The Prophet replied, “Was he not a human being?”

All these examples show the great love and mercy the blessed Prophet (Peace be upon him) had for mankind.

Even in his last breaths he only cared for the believers and not the terrible pain he was going through. How deep was the Prophets (Peace be upon him) love for us we could never imagine. He uttered: "Ummatii Ummatii, Ummatii" “My People, My People, My People".

vikorr
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 Feb, 2011 01:18 am
@Greatknight,
I found this interesting website :

http://www.thereligionofpeace.com/Quran/023-violence.htm

It starts off with the claim :

Quote:
The Quran contains at least 109 verses that call Muslims to war with nonbelievers. Some are quite graphic, with commands to chop off heads and fingers and kill infidels wherever they may be hiding. Muslims who do not join the fight are called 'hypocrites' and warned that Allah will send them to Hell if they do not join the slaughter.


It then goes on to quote each call to violence, and explain the context of it. Some of the information I have been familiar with some not. I can't truly vouch for it's credibility, though it certainly presents as well researched.
0 Replies
 
john1234345245
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Aug, 2011 05:13 pm
@fealola,
Thing is, these event shouldnt affect the state of ones religion since member of a religion are in close community and converting into another religion based on an event that blames that religion is pretty much a coward move. Also its evil to dislike others belief so the total value of this question is how come I cant believe people wont run away from there own belief beccause fo a event.
vikorr
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Aug, 2011 12:18 am
@john1234345245,
Quote:
Thing is, these event shouldnt affect the state of ones religion since member of a religion are in close community and converting into another religion based on an event that blames that religion is pretty much a coward move.
Could you explain why you find converting religions based on events a cowards move?

Quote:
Also its evil to dislike others belief
You're kidding, right?

What if I had a whole heap of evil beliefs, such that I put you in chains and beat you, lopped off a finger or two, or did the same to a daughter of yours or your mother? Would you still think it evil to dislike my beliefs that lead me to do such a thing? There are beliefs out there that we should dislike, and that we should speak out against, and sometimes even beliefs that we should stand against.
0 Replies
 
Rightanswer
 
  0  
Reply Sun 21 Aug, 2011 08:38 am
@firdaus,
because islam is the right relegion.you can assay it yourself.just read the sahife sjjadie (the prayers of one of the muslim's imams) to beleave it.but in america the goverment propagate iwrong idaes against islam.)


vikorr
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Aug, 2011 08:35 pm
@Rightanswer,
It's not hard to propogate 'wrong' ideas against Islam - thanks to the 'wrong' actions of many muslims who do much of the following:

- fight/kill amongst themselves between Sunni and Shiite
- all too frequently blow up lots of people / buildings / structures (9-11, London Tube, Spanish train, Bali clubs, Bombay bombings, etc)
- start civil wars (Western China, Southern Thailand, Sudan etc) - stats have them involved in 80% of the worlds wars/unrest currently
- bomb other religions (Indonesian church bombings)
- put to death people who convert to another religion (afghanistan, pakistan that I remember. Probably Saudi Arabia would too)
- can rape women without recourse (in Dubai it is the offence of adultery for a married woman to claim rape without the witness of 4 muslim men - as if muslim men would stand by and watch that...making it an offence to ever be raped)
- treat non muslims as second class citizens in almost any Islamic country
- treat their women as property (usually in Islamic countries, but even in non muslim countries)
- preach about how women that get pack raped by muslims unknown to them ask for it (very famous episode of this in australia) and how it is not the mens fault
- treat every attack on a muslim country as religiously motivated, even when the evidence points to political, economical, or resource driven motives (virtually any attack on an Islamic nation by a non Islamic nation attracts this sort of critique)
- blow up history (the Buddha statues carved into a cliff side in Afghanistan)

...now they stay quiet when they are in the minority (but then again the prophet told them when faced with a superior opponent, to convert by any means possible until they were strong enough to make demands)...

...but the history of Islamic spread across the world shows this to be a violent religion to this day. The actions of muslims to this day also show it to be an intolerant religion.

I dare say this summary doesn't do justice to the size of the problem, and leaves a lot of other ugly examples out.

From an outsiders point of view, with many of these problems so entrenched in the religion - What then is there to like about it?
Lustig Andrei
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Aug, 2011 08:44 pm
@vikorr,
Actually, I agree with everything you say, vikorr. But, you know, a similar list could be compiled quite easily showing that the Christian religion is quite barbaric and that those who practice Christianity are fanatic and ruthless.
vikorr
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Aug, 2011 08:53 pm
@Lustig Andrei,
Many people who raise this have a legitimate historical argument, but very much ignore that :

- Violent Christian barbarism (which certainly did exist) is largely history, while Violent Islamic barbarism is very current /the attitudes towards women and other religions has changed majorly for christianity, while it's rather negative in Islam

- The founder of christianity (Jesus) himself taught only peace, while the founder of Islam (the Prophet) taught conversion by the sword, underhanded conversion until you had power to convert by the sword, etc.

- Christianity sees a separation of powers between the Church and the State, while Islam doesn't.

They are two very different foundings, and two very different world views between State and Religion...

The repercussions of such beliefs should be obvious - and they are visible in the shape of todays world, and many of the events that have happened and are happening.

Btw - I don't belong to a religion.
Lustig Andrei
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Aug, 2011 11:55 pm
@vikorr,
vikorr wrote:

Many people who raise this have a legitimate historical argument, but very much ignore that :

- Violent Christian barbarism (which certainly did exist) is largely history, while Violent Islamic barbarism is very current /the attitudes towards women and other religions has changed majorly for christianity, while it's rather negative in Islam


Well, Christianity, of course, is some 600+plus years older than Islam. In time the Muslims may also change.

vikorr wrote:
- The founder of christianity (Jesus) himself taught only peace, while the founder of Islam (the Prophet) taught conversion by the sword, underhanded conversion until you had power to convert by the sword, etc.


Jesus did not found the Christian church. That was Saint Paul and his cohorts.

vikorr wrote:
- Christianity sees a separation of powers between the Church and the State, while Islam doesn't.

They are two very different foundings, and two very different world views between State and Religion...


Nonsense. The idea in Christian lands that secular power could be separated from church power is of very recent vintage indeed. Even after the so-called Reformation of Martin Luther, all that happened in some countries (e.g. England under Henr VIII) was that the secular arm of the state now exercised its authority over the religious institutions as well. Prior to that, kings and princes and other secular rulers kept their thrones by the grace of the Pope in Rome.


vikorr wrote:
Btw - I don't belong to a religion.


Neither do I.
vikorr
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Aug, 2011 02:55 am
@Lustig Andrei,
Quote:
Well, Christianity, of course, is some 600+plus years older than Islam. In time the Muslims may also change.
A rather surface only thought :

-as both possess great age, the age of the religion as a comparison is redundant, for they have both gone from a superstitious age to an age of industry to an age of science. Both have access to the same teachings/learnings, and ones violent leanings largely changed with the times, while the other continues to produce a number of very violent events (from numerous different locations and sources) based on it's teachings

- the founders (see below) had different teaching regarding violence and tolerance. It is this more than anything that appears to have affected the way each religion has developed in relation to violence and tolerance.

- One is already much changed regarding violence/tolerance, while the other can only be guesswork whether it will or not.

Quote:
Jesus did not found the Christian church. That was Saint Paul and his cohorts.
You are talking about the literal founders (which is debatable as to who they are anyway), while I am talking about the effective founder - the central figure of the religion, the starter of the religion, the initial teacher etc. Both Jesus and The prophet (too lazy to look up how to spell Mohammed - if that's right) are such...without whom their respective religions would not exist.


Quote:
Nonsense. The idea in Christian lands that secular power could be separated from church power is of very recent vintage indeed.
You are agreeing with me - so it obviously cannot be nonsense.
 

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