9
   

Drs. = female doctor?

 
 
Reply Tue 27 Apr, 2010 07:01 pm

Context:
Tobacco Product Regulation " A Public Health Approach
The Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act provides the FDA with the authority to regulate tobacco products. Drs. Lawrence Deyton, Joshua Sharfstein, and Margaret Hamburg from the FDA describe the implementation of this law.
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Type: Question • Score: 9 • Views: 30,044 • Replies: 23

 
View best answer, chosen by oristarA
Francis
  Selected Answer
 
  4  
Reply Tue 27 Apr, 2010 07:51 pm
No, Oristar, it means that all the persons listed are doctors.

Dr=doctor
Drs=doctors
0 Replies
 
MontereyJack
 
  2  
Reply Tue 27 Apr, 2010 10:48 pm
And they are probably all males except for Margaret Hamburg. The abbreviation is gender-neutral.
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Wed 28 Apr, 2010 12:26 am
Thank you both
0 Replies
 
englishabc
 
  0  
Reply Wed 9 Feb, 2011 12:01 am
@MontereyJack,
Francis is right.
0 Replies
 
surovi
 
  -1  
Reply Tue 17 Jan, 2012 06:46 am
Dr=doctor
Drs=doctors
i think not
Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Tue 17 Jan, 2012 06:55 am
@surovi,
You also apparently think you can speak English properly. The evidence of your posts gives that the lie.
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 Jan, 2012 08:48 am
I believe English is the holy grail in the forest of languages. To serve as its guardian is a great honor.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 Jan, 2012 08:52 am
@oristarA,
oristarA wrote:
I believe English is the holy grail in the forest of languages.
To serve as its guardian is a great honor.
Thank u, Oristar.





David
sonya12
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Feb, 2012 02:38 pm
what is the difference between the followings!?

Dr vs Dr.
Drs vs Drs.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Feb, 2012 03:11 pm
@sonya12,
It's correct to use the period after an abbreviation. It is becoming more common to leave it off, but I suggest you continue to use Dr. and Drs.
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Feb, 2012 04:26 pm
@roger,

Roger is right.
0 Replies
 
MontereyJack
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Feb, 2012 04:33 pm
I may be wrong on this, but I think American usage has consistently been to use the perior (or "full stop" depending on what continent you're from), whereas Brit usage has generally been to omit it (tho, see above, this may be changing). I know I've seen the period-less usage in books from England, which kind of surprised me.
MontereyJack
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Feb, 2012 04:52 pm
make that "period", not "perior".
0 Replies
 
sonya12
 
  1  
Reply Wed 8 Feb, 2012 12:14 am
thx!
0 Replies
 
BidmeFarewell
 
  2  
Reply Fri 15 Jun, 2012 02:52 pm
@MontereyJack,
You are right, good fellow... in that you may be wrong... good form!
0 Replies
 
overstun
 
  -2  
Reply Tue 31 Jul, 2012 06:29 am
@Setanta,
Opposed to Setanta, who's cruising to have her syntax privs revoked
0 Replies
 
bobsal u1553115
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Feb, 2014 08:30 am
@oristarA,
Would a Mr be a male mistress?
glitterbag
 
  2  
Reply Sun 16 Feb, 2014 05:55 pm
@bobsal u1553115,
I'm not sure, but it was fun pondering the idea that a woman could be referred to as a doctoress, plural: doctoresses. Also, I was unaware that Omsigdavid invented the English language, he must be older than I thought.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  -1  
Reply Sun 16 Feb, 2014 10:14 pm
@roger,
Roger the dodger: It's correct to use the period after an abbreviation. It is becoming more common to leave it off, but I suggest you continue to use Dr. and Drs.
-------------

In that case, roger, you forgot a period. It is not "correct" to use a period as you have suggested. It is an option.

Still misleading people after all these years, dodger.
0 Replies
 
 

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