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Where do I buy fresh yeast?

 
 
Bohne
 
Reply Tue 6 Jan, 2009 02:59 pm
In Germany I could get than in any supermarket, here, even Harris Teeter, who has a lot of stuff does not have it.

Anyone knows where I can get it (in NC)?
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Type: Question • Score: 8 • Views: 80,484 • Replies: 40
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Green Witch
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Jan, 2009 03:04 pm
@Bohne,
I'm surprised you can find it in the supermarket dairy or baking section. I sometimes buy some from my local pizza place or bakery. They buy in bulk and it's very fresh. For 2 dollars I get a 6 month supply. I have a local food co-op that also gets good yeast, but I assume you don't have one or you would not be asking the question.
0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Jan, 2009 03:09 pm
@Bohne,
Not sure if you mean something different than this with the term "fresh" yeast. If you refer to fresh active dry yeast, then here's my suggestion:

I get mine online from bulkfoods.com.

Here's a link to the page that has yeast included on it:

http://www.bulkfoods.com/baking.asp

I bought a pound of it for $6.00 more than a year ago and keep a small jar of it in the refrigerator with the bulk of it in the freezer. I still have about half a pound remaining and it is still as active as when I first purchased it.

You'll also find active dry yeast in most super markets in the baking and spices aisle. The common brand to look for is Red Star or Fleischman's.

http://www.glyn.dk/blog/uploaded_images/yeast-732837.jpg

http://www.redstaryeast.com/images/active_combo.jpg
0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Jan, 2009 03:17 pm
@Bohne,
You mentioned Harris Teeter. I just checked their website and they offer online shopping so I was able to see their inventory.

http://www.harristeeter.com/default.aspx

I found the same yeast brands and packaging I showed images of in my prior post.

It was burried a few layers. Here's the route I had to take to find it.

Main list of categories:

The Ingredients Aisle:

The Rising Agent Shelf:

Various baking sodas, baking powders and yeasts.



Next time you are there, ask a clerk to direct you to the location.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Jan, 2009 05:18 pm
@Bohne,
You have Food Lions or Piggly WIgglies in NC? I cant believe a regular supermarket doesn t have yeast , especially in the SOuth. Hell the raised DONUT is a southern invention
0 Replies
 
Bohne
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Jan, 2009 07:09 am
Not sure what you would call it other than fresh yeast, but it is not dry and if you buy it and keep it for six months it is not what I am talking about.

In Germany it came in cubes maybe 2 inches sidelength.
It has a weird texture, a little like clay, maybe.
And it would be in the cooling section with butter and milk.

I can get dried yeast here, but unfortunately I have a few recipes that do not work with dried yeast.
Green Witch
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Jan, 2009 07:27 am
@Bohne,
You're looking for fresh or compressed yeast, not dry. This is what you can get from professional bakers and pizza places. It's available on line if you search "fresh yeast", but I've seen it many supermarkets. It sometimes comes in a box that looks like a child's milk carton, but I've also seen it in the cube form in the dairy section.
0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Jan, 2009 07:36 am
@Bohne,
Ah, we call it caked yeast, compressed yeast or wet yeast. In the United States you can usually find Compressed/Cake Yeast in most large supermarkets in or near the dairy section of the store. It usually is packaged in cubes wrapped in silver foil. The most common brand found in supermarkets is Fleischmann's Yeast. It isn't used that much anymore because of the high spoilage rate. You might also be able to buy some from a local bakery or pizza parlor that makes their own doughs.

http://www.foodsubs.com/Photos/yeast-cake.jpg

http://www.foodsubs.com/LeavenYeast.html

Quote:
fresh yeast = compressed yeast = active fresh yeast = cake yeast = baker's compressed yeast = wet yeast Equivalents: 2-ounce cake = 3 X 0.6-ounce cakes Notes: This form of yeast usually comes in 0.6-ounce or 2-ounce foil-wrapped cakes. It works faster and longer than active dry yeast, but it's very perishable and loses potency a few weeks after it's packed. It's popular among commercial bakers, who can keep ahead of the expiration dates, but home bakers usually prefer dry yeast. To use, soften the cake in a liquid that's 70° - 80° F. Store fresh yeast in the refrigerator, well wrapped, or in the freezer, where it will keep for up to four months. If you freeze it, defrost it for a day in the refrigerator before using. Substitutes: active dry yeast (Substitute one package or 2 1/4 teaspoons for each .6-ounce cake of compressed yeast) OR instant yeast (Substitute one package or 2 1/4 teaspoons for each cake of compressed yeast) OR bread machine yeast (Substitute 2 1/4 teaspoons for each cake of compressed yeast)


0 Replies
 
Bohne
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Jan, 2009 12:13 pm
Thank you all, I will try again.
I specifically asked in the Food Lion and the Harris Teeter, even the bakery section, where they bake fresh bread, but they did not have any.

But I know, there is a German Bakery somewhere in town.
I'll ask there sometime this week.
Green Witch
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Jan, 2009 12:55 pm
@Bohne,
When I buy from the bakery or my local pizza guy I am buying some of their kitchen stock. I don't mean to imply they sell it as a retail item. My pizza guy knows I have an outdoor clay oven and that I need a reliable quick yeast to get the best results, thus the compacted yeast. He doesn't even really measure what he gives me (he scoops it out of a carton), but it's always enough to last me about 6 months if I bake once a week. I guess the best advice I give you is be nice your local pizza maker.
Bohne
 
  1  
Reply Thu 8 Jan, 2009 08:19 am
@Green Witch,
O you might not believe it, but I can be nice...

Smile

Thank you!
0 Replies
 
Bohne
 
  1  
Reply Sat 24 Jan, 2009 01:44 pm
Hey people

I did not pursue this issue as much in the last few weeks, but today I actually got 250g fresh yeast from a European bakery.
I am ecstatic and will make fresh rolls for breakfast tomorrow.
Just thought I'd let you know!
Bohne
 
  1  
Reply Sat 24 Jan, 2009 01:45 pm
@Green Witch,
Hi Green Witch
Do you have any real great bread recipes you could share with me?
I have a few good ones, but I am still in search for the PERFECT one!
Green Witch
 
  1  
Reply Sat 24 Jan, 2009 02:29 pm
@Bohne,
I make a lot of quick breads (biscuits, naan, poori, pizza dough creations). We have a outdoor clay oven I like to use and those work best since they do not require long steady heat. Occasionally I do long rise breads and I like to make things like bialeys. Give me an idea of what you want to bake and I'm sure I can come up with something.
0 Replies
 
squinney
 
  1  
Reply Sat 24 Jan, 2009 02:37 pm
@Bohne,
I didn't realize yu are in NC, Bohne. Are you Triad, Triangle, mountains or beach?
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 24 Jan, 2009 03:08 pm
Mad bread baker that I am, I've never seen fresh yeast in a store. Thanks for the clue, GW.


0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 24 Jan, 2009 03:39 pm
Bohne et al - These are some bread discussions by a food writer some of us like, Mark Bittman. I haven't tried this type of bread myself since I am happy with another set of recipes, but I keep meaning to try those recipes with this method.

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/11/08/dining/08mini.html?scp=1&sq=mark%20bittman%20and%20bread&st=cse
http://bitten.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/10/08/faster-no-knead-bread/
http://bitten.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/12/19/about-that-whole-wheat-brick/

You probably have to register with the NY Times website to see the articles.

I know ehBeth has tried the no knead slow rise method (or I think I know that) and likes it.
0 Replies
 
Bohne
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 Jan, 2009 12:00 pm
@green witch: I like the German bread from the bakeries. I have just make a little cute loaf called 'artisan bread'.
Not tried it yet, I am almost afraid to cut it, but it looks beautiful.
My husband wants bread that does not crumble, so he can make sandwiches for work with it.

@squinney: we live in Fayetteville, which I suppose counts as beach, even though it's 1.5 hours from the sea.

@ossobucco: I will have a look at those in a bit, thank you very much.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 Jan, 2009 12:28 pm
@Bohne,
Oh - the links I gave are for making "hearth breads/artisan type breads/country breads", and they aren't usually the best for sandwich breads that you might find in the grocery store. I like them better for sandwiches, usually toasted and open-faced, myself, but people that are used to store bread here in the US might not like them.
Bohne
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 Jan, 2009 12:37 pm
@ossobuco,
Yes, I fear, that will be an issue with my husband, too.
But I am fed up with the american soggy loaves and hope to convert him one of these days...
Wink
 

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