gollum
 
Reply Sun 5 Oct, 2008 01:38 pm
There is a word pronounced "turine" that refers to some sort of kitchen dish but I can not find it in the dictionary.

Help.

(By the way, there used to be separate "rooms" within able2know for different subjects. Apparently that was discontinued. Why?)
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Type: Question • Score: 1 • Views: 7,995 • Replies: 14
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Foxfyre
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Oct, 2008 01:47 pm
@gollum,
The word is 'tourine' and refers to a large soup bowl or dispenser--usually one that serves several people. Usually said as two words though: "soup tourine"
Ticomaya
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Oct, 2008 01:51 pm
@gollum,
gollum wrote:
(By the way, there used to be separate "rooms" within able2know for different subjects. Apparently that was discontinued. Why?)

Because this new way -- where threads are just floating out there until "tagged" -- is just so much better.

<insert rolly-eyed, sarcastic emoticon>
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Oct, 2008 02:00 pm
@Foxfyre,
Foxfyre wrote:

The word is 'tourine' and refers to a large soup bowl or dispenser--usually one that serves several people. Usually said as two words though: "soup tourine"


What is the difference between a 'soup tourine', a 'terrine' and a 'tureen'? Just "academic"? (We use in [every-day-) German just one word for all, terrine.
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Oct, 2008 02:36 pm
According to a post in wikipedia that sounds correct to me, terrine and tureen are two different types of dishes.

link - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terrine
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Oct, 2008 02:40 pm
@ossobuco,
Here in my neck of the woods, northeast USA, the soup serving bowl I've always know to be called tureen. I wasn't aware of other spellings - not that I discount other possibilities.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Oct, 2008 02:51 pm
@Ragman,
According to Britannic as well as MW, a terrine is a 1) a tureen, 2) an earthenware jar containing a table delicacy.

A tureen is 1) a deep footed vessel with a cover from which cooked foods (as soup, sauce, or eggs) are served at table, 2) a casserole.


Tourine seems to be some local/regional spelling of tureen - or terrine?
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Oct, 2008 03:01 pm
@gollum,
when we did more fancy cooking, we spent many hours making pates or terrines out of various organ meats and stuff like lobster or shrimp. terrines were, I believe, those that were cooked in water baths for long times under low heat in a moist heat oven. I may be wrong but thats what I recall , so Ill stick with that, FINAL ANSWER.
Foxfyre
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Oct, 2008 03:08 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
As Ragman pointed out, tureen is another spelling and probably more commonly used than tourine. I don't think I've ever seen 'tourine' used alone--it's always a 'soup tourine' while tureen is used alone. 'Terrine' is not used in our part of the world and is not a familiar term. I don't know if it in other parts of the country or not. Farmerman relates it to an edible whatever and, while I've never heard of such myself, I accept that it is common where he is/was.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Oct, 2008 03:12 pm
@farmerman,
I know this use of the term as well ... both in the (original) French as well as in German.
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farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Oct, 2008 03:14 pm
@Foxfyre,
Yeah, the word was "terrine" and it was a kind of pate. I think the name came from the vessel in which its prepared. We always just used these large(2qt or so) Corning covered oven vessels.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Oct, 2008 03:16 pm
@Foxfyre,
In German, many say 'soup terrine' as well - actually a pleonasm.
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ossobuco
 
  0  
Reply Sun 5 Oct, 2008 03:18 pm
All right -

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
A terrine is a glazed earthenware (terracotta, French terre cuite) cooking dish with vertical sides and a tightly fitting lid, generally oblong or oval. Modern versions are also made of enameled cast-iron.
Terrine may also easily be confused with tureen, a large, deep, and usually round or oval covered dish, used for serving soups or stews.

By extension, the term also refers to food prepared and served in a terrine, mainly game and venison, brawn (head cheese) and pâtés. If it has been pressed and chilled, then turned out for serving in slices, a terrine becomes a pâté, which Julia Child called "a luxurious cold meatloaf".

end/quote



Obviously, says me, tureen or, perhaps, tourine, are the soup serving dishes, usually fairly large.

Spellcheck tells me tourine is incorrect - I've no idea, but I've never seen it spelled that way, not that that is significant.

I have eaten pates from terrines, in the occasional french restaurant and elsewhere. I think the size varies re different sized pates to be made.
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Oct, 2008 03:23 pm
@farmerman,
In French, for instance, you can say either "pate de foie" (meaning the pie) or "terrine de foie" (and then you think more of the pate in the terrine).
tinlid
 
  0  
Reply Fri 28 May, 2010 09:03 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Yes a tourine is a soup holder like this one http://www.kaleeko.com/images/_products/iwds/179-CILTST.jpg
0 Replies
 
 

 
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