2
   

Favorite Pizza?

 
 
cjhsa
 
Reply Mon 19 May, 2008 09:20 am
Frankie, Johnny, and Luigi's in Mountain View, CA. The Stomboli.

Second place goes to Uno's. Third goes to Tony & Albas, also in Mountain View (but I like their San Jose location better).
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Discussion • Score: 2 • Views: 1,719 • Replies: 34
No top replies

 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 May, 2008 12:43 pm
I used to love Uno's Spinnocolli pizza, when there was still one in town.

Now I'll stick to homemade - lotsa garlic and cheeses, tomatoes and mushrooms, and sweet Italian sausage.
0 Replies
 
cjhsa
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 May, 2008 12:48 pm
T&A's (Tony & Alba's) has a "Gilroy" pizza topped with jalapenos, garlic, and linguica that is da bomb.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 May, 2008 12:59 pm
mmm garlic

it can make just about anything delicious
0 Replies
 
George
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 May, 2008 01:40 pm
Santarpio's
East Boston MA
0 Replies
 
George
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 May, 2008 01:42 pm
Amelio's
Montreal QC

I used to say there was no good pizza to be had north of the border.
Amelio's changed my mind.
0 Replies
 
TTH
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 May, 2008 01:50 pm
The best pizza I ever had was at an Italian restaurant in Germany. The waiters only spoke Italian and I didn't know how to speak Italian or German. I don't remember the name of the restaurant since it has been 7 years now.
0 Replies
 
mismi
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 May, 2008 01:57 pm
Mellow Mushroom - Gourmet White Pizza, olive oil sauce, minced garlic, sun-dried tomatoes, provolone, mozzarella, feta, fresh tomatoes and onions. Yum...stinky breath though....

Chicken Cordon Bleu - olive oil and garlic base, mozzarella, chicken, onions ham and roasted red peppers...

I like good ol' pizza with regular tomato sauce pepperoni and mushrooms too...yummy.
0 Replies
 
cjhsa
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 May, 2008 03:45 pm
Here in west Michigan it's Vitales or bust. Nothing else comes close.

http://www.vitalesada.net
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 May, 2008 04:11 pm
Homemade.

Soon it'll be time for pizza with whole milk mozzarella, garlic, thin sliced green tomatoes, sweet italian sausage, spritz of good olive oil.

later for mozzarella, sliced red tomatoes from garden, basil, garlic, with or without hot italian sausage. spritz of olive oil

haven't made a pizza with carmelized onions in a long time...

well, there are lots of possible toppings, but I like homemade pizza in general.
0 Replies
 
cjhsa
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 May, 2008 06:29 am
I enjoy making my own pizza as well. Sometimes I spice the dough too. One I like to do is the Spago spicy chicken pizza (Wolfgang Puck). Trouble is he's now selling a barbecue chicken pizza instead, which isn't as good. I used to just copy the ingredients off the label and improvise.
0 Replies
 
mismi
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 May, 2008 06:58 am
I make a barbecue chicken pizza that is pretty good. That is the only one I really enjoy at home though...pizza night is usually my night NOT to have to cook. I appreciate that.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 May, 2008 08:09 am
I like nearly any pizza, but it should have mozzarella di bufala on it.

My all over favourite, howerver, is just a plain pizza with prosciutto di Parma and Parmigiano-Reggiano on it.

And that's what you can get at most pizzerias - no need to make it at home.
0 Replies
 
cjhsa
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 May, 2008 08:12 am
You wouldn't find that at 99.999% of pizzarias in the states. That is why pizza has its own thread. Pizza is Italian only because of the association created in the USA. It dates back pre-Roman empire.

If you used proscuitto di parma and reggiano in enough quantity to make most Americans want to eat it, it would cost about $100 for a 12" pie.

(It does sound good though Walt).
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 May, 2008 08:36 am
cjhsa wrote:
Pizza is Italian only because of the association created in the USA. It dates back pre-Roman empire.



That is .... ehem, not correct. And shows at least a bit of great ignorance.



From the wikipedia rarticle: "Due to the wide influence of Italian and Greek immigrants in American culture, the United States has developed quite a large number of regional forms of pizza, many bearing only a casual resemblance to the Italian original."

"Traditonal Italian Pizza" will become a protected designation of origin (in Europe) under EU-law shortly. (Already is in many countries by national law.)

Pizza couldn't be made pre 18th century - only then, the tomatoe became known in Italy.
Pizza pugliese and pitta inchiusa are known since a long time before - but were made without tomatoes and had (nearly) totally different ingredients.
You are thinking of "panis focacius", I suppose. That, a flat bread baked in the ashes of the hearth, is indeed known by the Etruscans and perhaps ancient Greeks and somehow related to pizza because most probably people put some foodstuff on it.
0 Replies
 
cjhsa
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 May, 2008 08:38 am
I'll stick to my story. TYVM. There would be no pizza in Italy if not for the Italian immigrants to the USA.

I also think your euro-protectionism laws are just plain silly, and show a great deal of arrogance.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 May, 2008 08:46 am
cjhsa wrote:
I'll stick to my story. TYVM. There would be no pizza in Italy if not for the Italian immigrants to the USA..


That's stupid and totally nonsense - or do you really believe that thousands of old sources and files are false and Italians didn't excist for a couple of centuries? (Yes, I think, you do believe it.) Where else could the man from the eat ouside while he couldn't afford to go to a restaurant?
0 Replies
 
cjhsa
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 May, 2008 08:48 am
Pizza Margherita, the first modern pizza with toppings, had tomatoes on it. Those tomatoes came from America. Since Columbus was technically an Italian (from what is now Genoa), you can safely assume Italian explorers/immigrants to the USA helped spawn what is now considered "pizza".
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 May, 2008 08:54 am
Yes.

But either the old Greeks and Etruscians (it's known since pre-roman times, as you said, too) had secret connections to USA and the USA was created earlier than all besides you know or ...

Stop Shocked Since the Spanish distributed the tomato throughout their colonies in the Caribbean and than to Europe, it certainly has to be of American origin. Got it.
0 Replies
 
cjhsa
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 May, 2008 08:57 am
We fixed it. Popularized it. Italian Americans should be proud of their accomplishment.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

Should We Eat Our American Neighbours? - Question by mark noble
Favorite Italian Food? - Discussion by cjhsa
The Last Thing You Put In Your Mouth.... - Discussion by Dorothy Parker
Cincinnati Chili - Discussion by cjhsa
Quiznos - Discussion by cjhsa
Stuffed Winter Squash - Discussion by cjhsa
Microwaveably Safe - Discussion by gollum
Dinner with AC/DC - Discussion by cjhsa
 
  1. Forums
  2. » Favorite Pizza?
Copyright © 2014 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.06 seconds on 04/20/2014 at 07:20:15