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What BOOK are you reading right now?

 
 
ossobucotemp
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Dec, 2016 10:25 am
@Marykg,
That's Agatha Christie isn't it? I remember liking it, but have no memory of the details.
Marykg
 
  1  
Reply Fri 9 Dec, 2016 07:28 am
@ossobucotemp,
Yes, it's a great book. I actually just finished it and next on the line is Pride and Prejudice.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 9 Dec, 2016 01:21 pm
@Marykg,
Wyoming Tales by Annie Proulx. Im catching up on her skills as a writer of novels, non-fiction, and earlier, short stories.
Wyoming Stories is the book in which Brokeback Mountain appeared
ossobucotemp
 
  1  
Reply Fri 9 Dec, 2016 02:19 pm
I bought a batch of books at GoodWill, and got a few others from a friend, so I'm set for a while.

In no particular order, as I grab them out of the bag:

Karen Brown's Italy, Charming Bed and Breakfasts
This is pure nostalgia as there is little chance I'll get there again: first I'd have to buy a lottery ticket.. I tend to like 1 star family run alberghi anyway.

The Exotic Marigold Hotel, novel by Deborah Moggach. I haven't seen the movie either.

The Ophelia Cut, suspense novel by John Lescroart, whose books I've liked in the past.

The Name of the Rose, Umberto Eco. Being a mad italophile, I should have read this long ago. Will report..

The Namesake, Jhumpa Lahiri; I think I have read her before, don't recognize the titles, so I may be mixing her up with another writer.

Wild Fire, Nelson DeMille; I usually like his books.

The White Pearl, novel by Kate Furnivall. Set in Mayala, 1941.

Without a Hero, T. Coraghessan Boyle; stories. Writer I've liked.

Bread and Wine, Ignazio Silone, novel in translation, set between the wars, around Rome. I've read his name as an author more than once, but have never run across one of his books before. I'm likely to be engrossed, and if not, it's a small paperback.

Tepper Isn't Going Out, Calvin Trillin - this is a known "I'm going to like it", he's a smart and often funny man, whom I first ran into now decades ago while reading one of his articles in the New Yorker, subject being how to make your own tripe (oh, my my). On the title, I've no idea who Tepper is, but I'll find out.

Caramelo, Sandra Cisneros. I've read about her, including something about people being appalled about what color she painted her San Antonio house (I'm on her side, long story). So I've been interested, but haven't yet read her books - this is a good find.

The Turnaround, George Pelecanos, famously good writer, producer, etc. Not positive I've read him (the mind fuzzes if one reads a lot of crime novels). I've already gotten started on this one, letting a book I plan to continue have a break for a while. (Wallace Stegner is just great, but I need a rest from all the discussion... too much like A2Kers arguing over and over.)
George
 
  1  
Reply Fri 9 Dec, 2016 02:30 pm
@ossobucotemp,
Of those, I have read The Name of the Rose and enjoyed it immensely.
ossobucotemp
 
  1  
Reply Fri 9 Dec, 2016 02:42 pm
@George,
Good, that's two votes! Diane raved about it but she's reducing her level of stuff; so am I, but I'm slower, since I'm sentimental for many reasons having to do with losses of people and places. Not that others don't deal with that too.
0 Replies
 
ossobucotemp
 
  1  
Reply Fri 9 Dec, 2016 02:48 pm
@farmerman,
I've liked Annie Proulx, now quite a while ago, and, back then, a mix.
0 Replies
 
ossobucotemp
 
  1  
Reply Mon 26 Dec, 2016 11:24 am
Reporting in -

George Pelicanos, The Turnaround: liked it, Pelicanos knows how to write.

John Lescroart, The Ophelia Cut: just passes, as I liked it way the least of the books I've read by him., which I usually enjoyed.

Ignazio Silone, Bread and Wine: I've read the author's notes; they were both explanatory and touched on why he rewrote the book a batch of decades later, all interesting to me. I often skip authors' notes until I finish the book, but this time I read up first. Of the book text, I'm only on page 21 but so far so good.

0 Replies
 
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Mon 26 Dec, 2016 11:35 am
@farmerman,
Ha! Thanks for the idea. I adored The Shipping News like nobody's business.

I'm hard-mulling Infinite Jest because of a real stubborn streak. It's the most oft-cited unfinished novel. And David Foster Wallace is arguably among the best writers America has produced.

I glowered at a copy for 20 minutes on Christmas Eve in the Georgia Tech bookstore. A good once-over is usually Round One of my Buying an Intimidating Book routine. So, nearly there.

Next up is Infinite Jest or something fun by David Sedaris.

0 Replies
 
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Thu 29 Dec, 2016 07:42 am
The cosmos made my choice for me. The public library didn't have DFW's Infinite Jest: my choices were The Pale King - the book he didn't quite finish before his death, and The Broom of the Situation, which he wrote for his Ph.D. I wanted to save The Pale King, so selected the other. Also picked up Anthony Bourdain's Kitchen Confidential--started this one first--and it is delicious.

And picked up a professional read: Word Savvy by Nancy Ragno, but lost confidence when I found a word choice error in the How to Avoid Word Choice Errors chapter. I'm still hoping it was intentional and she'll mention it later.

Kitchen Confidential is surprisingly good.
0 Replies
 
tsarstepan
 
  2  
Reply Thu 29 Dec, 2016 10:33 am
Finished
I Am Half-Sick of Shadows by Alan Bradley;
Rereading Speaking from among the Bones.

0 Replies
 
Kolyo
 
  3  
Reply Sun 1 Jan, 2017 11:12 pm
I don't get much time to read books for pleasure these these days, but I was so disgusted with the hate bandied back in forth in this year's election that I read The Righteous Mind: Why Good People Are Divided By Politics and Religion, by Jonathan Haidt.

Among other things, this book seeks to explain why people can seem so tribal in their approach to politics. Brilliant stuff.
0 Replies
 
ossobucotemp
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Jan, 2017 04:27 pm
@ossobucotemp,
OK, now.

So far I've finished The Ophelia Cut, which read as familiar but because of some of the usual people peopleing the text, I wasn't sure. This was, for a change, an eh.

Wild Fire by Nelson De Mille, aggravating to plow through, to me.

Tepper Isn't Going Out, Calvin Trillin - this is a known "I'm going to like it", he's a smart and often funny man, whom I first ran into now decades ago while reading one of his articles in the New Yorker, subject being how to make your own tripe (oh, my my). On the title, I've no idea who Tepper is, but I'll find out.

Finished it. I'll give it an A-, as I wanted him to hurry up at some points, but in retrospect, respect his pacing, and he's smarter.
It is actually quite an interesting book for a lot or reasons involving speech and government and much else, including whitefish: it's going on the save shelf. I presume a2k ny'ers know about the book, at least somewhat about the matter of parking.
ossobucotemp
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Jan, 2017 04:51 pm
@ossobucotemp,
Re De Mille's book, mine was a paperback, something like 740 pages, and besides that the paperback was ill printed, probably cheaply: for most of the book, I couldn't see the last printed letter(s) at the binding. I had to take two hands in a good grip to see the last letters in the binding area. Trying to see the type is aggravating and a publishing squash.
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Jan, 2017 07:56 am
@ossobucotemp,
Finished:
The Outsorcerer's Apprentice (YouSpace, #3) by Tom Holt;
Ms. Marvel Vol. 6: Civil War II;
Paper Girls, Volume 1 by Brian K. Vaughan (WOW!)

tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 Jan, 2017 11:25 pm
@tsarstepan,
Ripped through the entire vol.5 (the final book) of Ex Machina by Bryan K. Vaughan, tonight.
0 Replies
 
hanna11
 
  1  
Reply Sat 21 Jan, 2017 08:47 am
@littlek,
The Alchemist - Paulo Coelho. I have read this book ten times within 5 years. But I still feel that I have not understand all messages the author gave.
0 Replies
 
 

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